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  1. Is Accessing of Words Affected by Affective Valence Only? A Discrete Emotion View on the Emotional Congruency Effect.Xuqian Chen, Bo Liu & Shouwen Lin - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  • Are Emotions Psychological Constructions?Charlie Kurth - 2018 - Philosophy of Science.
    According to psychological constructivism, emotions result from projecting folk emotion concepts onto felt affective episodes (e.g., Barrett 2017, LeDoux 2015, Russell 2004). Moreover, while constructivists acknowledge there’s a biological dimension to emotion, they deny that emotions are (or involve) affect programs. So they also deny that emotions are natural kinds. However, the essential role constructivism gives to felt experience and folk concepts leads to an account that’s extensionally inadequate and functionally inaccurate. Moreover, biologically-oriented proposals that reject these commitments are not (...)
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  • Toward a Microdevelopmental, Interdisciplinary Approach to Social Emotion.Mary Helen Immordino-Yang - 2010 - Emotion Review 2 (3):217-220.
    Social emotions about others’ minds, for example, admiration for virtue and compassion for social pain, play a critical role in interpersonal relationships, motivation, and morality. However, historical biases toward studying emotions as automatic reactions generated within a solitary individual limit our ability to study emotions about others’ minds, which are inherently complex, social, and subjective. Here, I argue that a microdevelopmental approach, that is, considering these emotions as dynamic, context-dependent mental constructions actively organized from simpler cognitive and affective psychological components, (...)
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  • Emotional Behaviors, Emotivational Goals, Emotion Strategies: Multiple Levels of Organization Integrate Variable and Consistent Responses.Ira J. Roseman - 2011 - Emotion Review 3 (4):434-443.
    Researchers have found undeniable variability and irrefutable evidence of consistencies in emotional responses across situations, individuals, and cultures. Both must be acknowledged in constructing adequate, enduring models of emotional phenomena. In this article I outline an empirically-grounded model of the structure of the emotion system, in which relatively variable actions may be used to pursue relatively consistent goals within discrete emotion syndromes; the syndromes form a stable, coherent set of strategies for coping with crises and opportunities. I also discuss a (...)
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  • Bridging Emotion Theory and Neurobiology Through Dynamic Systems Modeling.Marc D. Lewis - 2005 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (2):169-194.
    Efforts to bridge emotion theory with neurobiology can be facilitated by dynamic systems (DS) modeling. DS principles stipulate higher-order wholes emerging from lower-order constituents through bidirectional causal processes cognition relations. I then present a psychological model based on this reconceptualization, identifying trigger, self-amplification, and self-stabilization phases of emotion-appraisal states, leading to consolidating traits. The article goes on to describe neural structures and functions involved in appraisal and emotion, as well as DS mechanisms of integration by which they interact. These mechanisms (...)
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  • Emotional Modulation of Experimental Pain: A Source Imaging Study of Laser Evoked Potentials.Andrej Stancak & Nicholas Fallon - 2013 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.
  • The Role of the Amygdala in the Appraising Brain.David Sander, Kristen A. Lindquist, Tor D. Wager, Hedy Kober, Eliza Bliss-Moreau & Lisa Feldman Barrett - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (3):161.
    Lindquist et al. convincingly argue that the brain implements psychological operations that are constitutive of emotion rather than modules subserving discrete emotions. However, the nature of such psychological operations is open to debate. I argue that considering appraisal theories may provide alternative interpretations of the neuroimaging data with respect to the psychological operations involved.
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  • The Sleeping Brain and the Neural Basis of Emotions.Roumen Kirov, Serge Brand, Vasil Kolev & Juliana Yordanova - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (3):155-156.
    In addition to active wake, emotions are generated and experienced in a variety of functionally different states such as those of sleep, during which external stimulation and cognitive control are lacking. The neural basis of emotions can be specified by regarding the multitude of emotion-related brain states, as well as the distinct neuro- and psychodynamic stages (generation and regulation) of emotional experience.
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  • Neuroscience Findings Are Consistent with Appraisal Theories of Emotion; but Does the Brain “Respect” Constructionism?Klaus R. Scherer - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (3):163-164.
    I reject Lindquist et al.'s implicit claim that all emotion theories other than constructionist ones subscribe to a approach. The neural mechanisms underlying relevance detection, reward, attention, conceptualization, or language use are consistent with many theories of emotion, in particular componential appraisal theories. I also question the authors' claim that the meta-analysis they report provides support for the specific assumptions of constructionist theories.
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  • Psa 2018.Philsci-Archive -Preprint Volume- - unknown
    These preprints were automatically compiled into a PDF from the collection of papers deposited in PhilSci-Archive in conjunction with the PSA 2018.
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  • Appraisal Theories of Emotion: State of the Art and Future Development.Agnes Moors, Phoebe C. Ellsworth, Klaus R. Scherer & Nico H. Frijda - 2013 - Emotion Review 5 (2):119-124.
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  • What Are Emotions and How Are They Created in the Brain?Kristen A. Lindquist, Tor D. Wager, Eliza Bliss-Moreau, Hedy Kober & Lisa Feldman Barrett - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (3):172-202.
    In our response, we clarify important theoretical differences between basic emotion and psychological construction approaches. We evaluate the empirical status of the basic emotion approach, addressing whether it requires brain localization, whether localization can be observed with better analytic tools, and whether evidence for basic emotions exists in other types of measures. We then revisit the issue of whether the key hypotheses of psychological construction are supported by our meta-analytic findings. We close by elaborating on commentator suggestions for future research.
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  • The Brain Basis of Emotion: A Meta-Analytic Review.Kristen A. Lindquist, Tor D. Wager, Hedy Kober, Eliza Bliss-Moreau & Lisa Feldman Barrett - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (3):121-143.
    Researchers have wondered how the brain creates emotions since the early days of psychological science. With a surge of studies in affective neuroscience in recent decades, scientists are poised to answer this question. In this target article, we present a meta-analytic summary of the neuroimaging literature on human emotion. We compare the locationist approach (i.e., the hypothesis that discrete emotion categories consistently and specifically correspond to distinct brain regions) with the psychological constructionist approach (i.e., the hypothesis that discrete emotion categories (...)
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  • Studying Appraisal-Driven Emotion Processes: Taking Stock and Moving to the Future.Klaus R. Scherer - 2018 - Cognition and Emotion 33 (1):31-40.
  • Alternatives to the Fixed-Set Model: A Review of Appraisal Models of Emotion. [REVIEW]Julian W. Fernando, Yoshihisa Kashima & Simon M. Laham - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (1):19-32.
  • Emotions in Context: A Sociodynamic Model of Emotions.B. Mesquita & M. Boiger - 2014 - Emotion Review 6 (4):298-302.
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  • Emergent Ghosts of the Emotion Machine.James A. Coan - 2010 - Emotion Review 2 (3):274-285.
    Competing perspectives on the nature of emotion are illustrated with latent and emergent variable models. Latent variable models draw from classical test theory, assuming that the measured indicators of emotion covary by virtue of some common executive, organizing neural circuit or network in the brain. By contrast, emergent variable models draw from a theory-driven, operational definition tradition, positing that emotions do not cause, but rather are caused by, the measured indicators of emotion, assuming no executive neural circuit or network, and (...)
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  • Emotion and Emotion Regulation: Two Sides of the Developing Coin.Ross A. Thompson - 2011 - Emotion Review 3 (1):53-61.
    Systems theory holds that emotional responses derive from the continuous, mutual interaction between multiple neurobiological and behavioral systems associated with emotion as they are contextually embedded. Developmental systems theory portrays these systems as becoming progressively integrated as they mature. From this perspective, regulatory processes are incorporated into emotion throughout the course of emotional development. This article examines the implications of developmental systems theory in understanding the association between emotion and emotion regulation, enlisting the functionalist orientation of contemporary emotions theory, a (...)
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  • Jealousy as a Specific Emotion: The Dynamic Functional Model.Mingi Chung & Christine R. Harris - 2018 - Emotion Review 10 (4):272-287.
    We review the jealousy literature and present our Dynamic Functional Model of Jealousy, which argues that jealousy evolved and has its own unique motivational state aimed at preventing others from usurping important relationships. It has a core form that exists in infants and nonhuman animals and an elaborated form in humans that emerges as cognitive sophistication develops. The DFMJ proposes that jealousy is an unfolding process with early and late phases that can be differentially impacted by relationship and personality factors. (...)
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  • Concluding Commentary: Schadenfreude, Gluckschmerz, Jealousy, and Hate—What Are the Emotions?Ira J. Roseman & Amanda K. Steele - 2018 - Emotion Review 10 (4):327-340.
    Schadenfreude, gluckschmerz, jealousy, and hate are distinctive emotional phenomena, understudied and deserving of increased attention. The authors of this special section have admirably synthesized large literatures, describing major characteristics, eliciting conditions, and functions. We discuss the contributions of each article as well as the issues they raise for theories of emotions and some remaining questions, and suggest ways in which these might be profitably addressed.
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  • Mapping Discrete and Dimensional Emotions Onto the Brain: Controversies and Consensus.Stephan Hamann - 2012 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 16 (9):458-466.
  • Emotion Perception as Conceptual Synchrony.Maria Gendron & Lisa Feldman Barrett - 2018 - Emotion Review 10 (2):101-110.
    Psychological research on emotion perception anchors heavily on an object perception analogy. We present static “cues,” such as facial expressions, as objects for perceivers to categorize. Yet in the real world, emotions play out as dynamic multidimensional events. Current theoretical approaches and research methods are limited in their ability to capture this complexity. We draw on insights from a predictive coding account of neural activity and a grounded cognition account of concept representation to conceive of emotion perception as a stream (...)
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  • Constructing Contempt.Victoria L. Spring, C. Daryl Cameron, Kurt Gray & Kristen A. Lindquist - 2017 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 40.
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  • The Future of Emotion Research in the Study of Psychopathology.Ann M. Kring - 2010 - Emotion Review 2 (3):225-228.
    Research on emotion and psychopathology has blossomed due in part to the translation of affective science theory and methods to the study of diverse disorders. This translational approach has helped the field to hone in more precisely on the nature of emotion deficits to identify antecedent causes and maintaining processes, and to develop promising new interventions. The future of emotion research in psychopathology will benefit from three inter-related areas, including an emphasis on emotion difficulties that cut across traditional diagnostic boundaries (...)
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  • Emotion, Core Affect, and Psychological Construction.James A. Russell - 2009 - Cognition and Emotion 23 (7):1259-1283.
  • A Process Approach to Emotion and Personality: Using Time as a Facet of Data.Randy J. Larsen, Adam A. Augustine & Zvjezdana Prizmic - 2009 - Cognition and Emotion 23 (7):1407-1426.
  • Emotions, Individual Differences and Time Course: Reflections.Nico H. Frijda - 2009 - Cognition and Emotion 23 (7):1444-1461.
  • The Dynamic Architecture of Emotion: Evidence for the Component Process Model.Klaus R. Scherer - 2009 - Cognition and Emotion 23 (7):1307-1351.
  • The Appraisal Basis of Anger Occurrence and Intensity Revisited.Iven Van Mechelen & Kristien Hennes - 2009 - Cognition and Emotion 23 (7):1373-1388.