Switch to: References

Citations of:

Pacifying Politics

Political Theory 21 (1):6-27 (1993)

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Realizing the Social Contract: The Case of Colonialism and Indigenous Peoples.Robert Lee Nichols - 2005 - Contemporary Political Theory 4 (1):42-62.
    From 1922 to 1924, the Iroquois Confederacy — a federal union of six aboriginal nations — sought resolution of a dispute between themselves and Canada at the League of Nations. In this paper, the historical events of the 1920s League are employed as a case study to explore the development of the international society of states in the early 20th century as it relates to the indigenous peoples of North America. Specifically, it will be argued that the early modern practice (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Liberalism and Fear of Violence.Bruce Buchan - 2001 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 4 (3):27-48.
    Liberal political thought is underwritten by an enduring fear of civil and state violence. It is assumed within liberal thought that self?interest characterises relations between individuals in civil society, resulting in violence. In absolutist doctrines, such as Hobbes?, the pacification of private persons depended on the Sovereign's command of a monopoly of violence. Liberals, by contrast, sought to claim that the state itself must be pacified, its capacity for cruelty (e.g., torture) removed, its capacity for violence (e.g., war) reduced and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Politics, Violence and Revolutionary Virtue: Reflections On Locke and Sorel.Elizabeth Frazer & Kimberly Hutchings - 2009 - Thesis Eleven 97 (1):46-63.
    John Locke (1632—1704) and Georges Sorel (1859—1922) are commonly understood as representing opposed positions vis-a-vis revolution — with Locke representing the liberal distinction between violence and politics versus Sorel's rejection of politics in its pacified liberal sense. This interpretation is shown by a close reading of their works to be misleading. Both draw a necessary link between revolution and violence, and both mediate this link through the concept of `war'. They both depoliticize revolution, as for both of them `war' is (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark