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Nancy Bauer (2001). Simone de Beauvoir, Philosophy, and Feminism.

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  1.  14
    Singularity in Beauvoir's The Ethics of Ambiguity.Emily Anne Parker - 2015 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 53 (1):1-16.
    Though it has gone unnoticed so far in Beauvoir Studies, the term “singularity” is a technical one for Simone de Beauvoir. In the first half of the essay I discuss two reasons why this term has been obscured. First, as is well known Beauvoir has not been read in the context of the history of philosophy until recently. Second, in The Ethics of Ambiguity at least, singularité is translated both inconsistently and quite misleadingly. In the second half of the essay (...)
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  2.  7
    Beauvoir and Sartre: The Riddle of Influence. Edited by Christine Daigle and Jacob Golomb. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2009the Philosophy of Simone de Beauvoir: Ambiguity, Conversion, Resistance. By Penelope Deutscher. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2008. [REVIEW]Emily Anne Parker - 2012 - Hypatia 27 (3):936-942.
  3.  3
    The Viability of the Philosophical Novel: The Case of Simone de Beauvoir'sShe Came to Stay.Ashley King Scheu - 2012 - Hypatia 27 (4):791-809.
  4.  22
    The Viability of the Philosophical Novel: The Case of Simone de Beauvoir's "She Came to Stay".Ashley King Scheu - 2012 - Hypatia 27 (4):791 - 809.
    This article begins by asking if the project to write a philosophical novel is not inherently flawed; it would seem that the novelist must either write an ambiguous text, which would not create a strong enough argument to count as philosophy, or she must write a text with a clear argument, which would not be ambiguous enough to count as good fiction. The only other option available would be to exemplify a preexisting abstract philosophical system in the concrete literary world. (...)
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  5.  85
    Paradoxes of Femininity in the Philosophy of Simone de Beauvoir.Ulrika Björk - 2010 - Continental Philosophy Review 43 (1):39-60.
    This article explicates the meaning of the paradox from the perspective of sexual difference, as articulated by Simone de Beauvoir. I claim that the self, the other, and their becoming are sexed in Beauvoir’s early literary writing before the question of sexual difference is posed in The Second Sex (1949). In particular, Beauvoir’s description of Françoise’s subjective becoming in the novel She Came to Stay (1943) anticipates her later systematic description of ‘the woman in love’. In addition, I argue that (...)
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  6.  29
    Women, Hegel, and Recognition in The Second Sex.Karen Green & Nicholas Roffey - 2010 - Hypatia 25 (2):376 - 393.
    This paper develops a new account of Beauvoir's "Hegelianism" and argues that the strand of contemporary interpretation of Beauvoir that seeks to represent her thought in isolation from that of Jean-Paul Sartre constitutes a betrayal of the philosophy of recognition that she denves from Hegel. It underscores the extent to which Beauvoir influenced Sartre's Being and Nothingness and shows that Sartre and Beauvoir both adapted Hegel's ideas and agreed in rejecting his optimism.
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  7.  2
    "A Dream, Dreamed by Reason . . . Hollow Like All Dreams": French Existentialism and Its Critique of Abstract Liberalism. [REVIEW]Leeuwen Bart van & Vintges Karen - 2010 - Hypatia 25 (3):653 - 674.
    The recent chiming of Simone de Beauvoir's legacy by French feminists for a policy of assimilation of Muslim women to Western models of self and society reduces the complexity and richness of Beauvoir's views in inacceptable ways. This article explores to what extent a politics of difference that challenges the ideals and political strategies of abstract liberalism can be extracted from and legitimized by the philosophies of Simone de Beauvoir and Jean-Paul Sartre. Without assuming their thought is identical, we can (...)
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  8.  45
    That All Children Should Be Free: Beauvoir, Rousseau, and Childhood.Sally J. Scholz - 2010 - Hypatia 25 (2):394 - 411.
    Simone de Beauvoir offers one of the most interesting philosophical accounts of childhood, and, as numerous scholars have argued, it is one of the most important contributions that she made to existentialism. Beauvoir stressed the importance of childhood on one's ability to assume one's freedom. This radically changed how freedom was construed for existentialism. Rather than positing an adult subjectivity that tries to flee freedom through bad faith, Beauvoir's account forces a recognition of a situated freedom that itself is also (...)
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  9.  24
    Confronting an Impasse: Reflections on the Past and Future of Beauvoir Scholarship.Margaret Simons - 2010 - Hypatia 25 (4):909-926.
    Hypatia's twenty-fifth anniversary in 2009, coming on the heels of Simone de Beauvoir's 100th birthday in 2008, provides an ideal moment to reflect on the past and future of research on Beauvoir's philosophy—the subject of two past Hypatia issues. Reviewing these early issues in the light of more recent publications reveals both the progress in Beauvoir scholarship and a scholarly impasse that must be confronted if that progress is to continue.
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  10.  7
    “A Dream, Dreamed by Reason … Hollow Like All Dreams”: French Existentialism and Its Critique of Abstract Liberalism.Bart van Leeuwen & Karen Vintges - 2010 - Hypatia 25 (3):653-674.
    The recent claiming of Simone de Beauvoir's legacy by French feminists for a policy of assimilation of Muslim women to Western models of self and society reduces the complexity and richness of Beauvoir's views in inacceptable ways. This article explores to what extent a politics of difference that challenges the ideals and political strategies of abstract liberalism can be extracted from and legitimized by the philosophies of Simone de Beauvoir and Jean-Paul Sartre. Without assuming their thought is identical, we can (...)
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  11.  16
    Beauvoir-in-America: Understanding, Concrete Experience, and Beauvoir's Appropriation of Heidegger in "America Day by Day".Alexander Ruch - 2009 - Hypatia 24 (4):104 - 129.
    This paper reads Simone de Beauvoir's travel journal "America Day by Day" for its philosophical content. I argue that this work provides a unique approach to feminist, embodied philosophy, one that has been overlooked by the categorization of her writing into philosophical works and feminist ones. Such an approach, I contend, is enacted here through her use of Heidegger's concept of the everyday to inform her own treatment of understanding and experience.
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  12.  1
    Beauvoir-in-America: Understanding, Concrete Experience, and Beauvoir's Appropriation of Heidegger in America Day by Day.Alexander Ruch - 2009 - Hypatia 24 (4):104-129.
  13. Beauvoir, Hegel, War.Meryl Altman - 2007 - Hypatia 22 (3):66-91.
    : The importance of Hegel to the philosophy of Simone de Beauvoir, both to her early philosophical texts and to The Second Sex, is usually discussed in terms of the master-slave dialectic and a Kojève–influenced reading, which some see her as sharing with Sartre, others persuasively describe as divergent from and corrective to Sartre's. Altman shows that Hegel's influence on Beauvoir's work is also wider, both in terms of what she takes on board and what she works through and rejects, (...)
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  14.  4
    Beauvoir, Hegel, War.Meryl Altman - 2007 - Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy 22 (3):66-91.
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  15.  10
    Beauvoir, Hegel, War.Meryl Altman - 2007 - Hypatia 22 (3):66-91.
    The importance of Hegel to the philosophy of Simone de Beauvoir, both to her early philosophical texts and to The Second Sex, is usually discussed in terms of the master-slave dialectic and a Kojève-influenced reading, which some see her as sharing with Sartre, others persuasively describe as divergent from and corrective to Sartre's. Altman shows that Hegel's influence on Beauvoir's work is also wider, both in terms of what she takes on board and what she works through and rejects, and (...)
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  16.  74
    Simone de Beauvoir and the Ambiguous Ethics of Political Violence.Kimberly Hutchings - 2007 - Hypatia 22 (3):111-132.
    : In this essay, Hutchings contends that Simone de Beauvoir's argument in The Ethics of Ambiguity provides a valuable resource for feminists currently addressing the question of the legitimacy of political violence, whether of the state or otherwise. The reason is not that Beauvoir provides a definitive answer to this question, but rather because of the ways in which she deconstructs it. In enabling her reader to appreciate what is presupposed by a resistant politics that adopts violence as its instrument, (...)
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  17.  2
    Simone de Beauvoir and the Ambiguous Ethics of Political Violence.Kimberly Hutchings - 2007 - Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy 22 (3):111-132.
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  18.  5
    Simone de Beauvoir and the Ambiguous Ethics of Political Violence.Kimberly Hutchings - 2007 - Hypatia 22 (3):111-132.
    In this essay, Hutchings contends that Simone de Beauvoir's argument in The Ethics of Ambiguity provides a valuable resource for feminists currently addressing the question of the legitimacy of political violence, whether of the state or otherwise. The reason is not that Beauvoir provides a definitive answer to this question, but rather because of the ways in which she deconstructs it. In enabling her reader to appreciate what is presupposed by a resistant politics that adopts violence as its instrument, Beauvoir (...)
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  19.  73
    Life, Death and Subjectivity: Realism and Recognition in Continental Feminism.Pamela Sue Anderson - 2006 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 60 (1-3):41-59.
    I begin with the assumption that a philosophically significant tension exists today in feminist philosophy of religion between those subjects who seek to become divine and those who seek their identity in mutual recognition. My critical engagement with the ambiguous assertions of Luce Irigaray seeks to demonstrate, one the one hand, that a woman needs to recognize her own identity but, on the other hand, that each subject whether male or female must struggle in relation to the other in order (...)
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  20.  28
    Divinity, Incarnation and Intersubjectivity: On Ethical Formation and Spiritual Practice.Pamela Sue Anderson - 2006 - Philosophy Compass 1 (3):335-356.
    In what sense, if any, does the dominant conception of the traditional theistic God as disembodied inform our embodied experiences? Feminist philosophers of religion have been either explicitly or implicitly preoccupied by a philosophical failure to address such questions concerning embodiment and its relationship to the divine. To redress this failure, certain feminist philosophers have sought to appropriate Luce Irigaray’s argument that embodied divinity depends upon women themselves becoming divine. This article assesses weaknesses in the Irigarayan position, notably the problematic (...)
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