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Tim Bayne & Yujin Nagasawa (2006). The Grounds of Worship.

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  1.  10
    Do We Owe God Worship?Hugh Burling - forthcoming - Religious Studies:1-16.
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  2.  3
    The Shattered Spiritual Self: A Philosophical Exploration of Religious Trauma.Michelle Panchuk - 2018 - Res Philosophica 95 (3):505-530.
    In this paper I consider what a person who finds herself religiously incapacitated ought to do. More specifically, I address people who have come to God asking for bread, but who seem to have received stones and serpents in its place. This is a manifestation of the phenomenon that I call religious trauma. My goals in this paper are twofold. First, I aim to demonstrate that, because religious trauma can be genuinely religiously incapacitating, it can result in non-culpable failure to (...)
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  3.  18
    The Idolatry Argument Against Natural Theology: How It Works and Why It Fails.Hugh Burling - 2015 - Religious Studies 51 (3):401-410.
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  4. Stumbling on the Threshold: A Reply to Gwiazda on Threshold Obligations.John Danaher - 2012 - Religious Studies 48 (4):469-478.
    Bayne and Nagasawa have argued that the properties traditionally attributed to God provide an insufficient grounding for the obligation to worship God. They do so partly because the same properties, when possessed in lesser quantities by human beings, do not give rise to similar obligations. In a recent paper, Jeremy Gwiazda challenges this line of argument. He does so because it neglects the possible existence of a threshold obligation to worship, i.e. an obligation that only kicks in when the value (...)
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  5. The Power to Make Others Worship.Aaron Smuts - 2012 - Religious Studies 48 (2):221 - 237.
    Can any being worthy of worship make others worship it? I think not. By way of an analogy to love, I argue that it is perfectly coherent to think that one could be made to worship. However, forcing someone to worship violates their autonomy, not because worship must be freely given, but because forced worship would be inauthentic—much like love earned through potions. For this reason, I argue that one cannot be made to worship properly; forced worship would be unfitting. (...)
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  6.  88
    Omniscience and Worthiness of Worship.Wesley D. Cray - 2011 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 70 (2):147-153.
    At first glance, the properties being omniscient and being worthy of worship might appear to be perfectly co-instantiable. But there are reasons to be worried about this co-instantiability, as it turns out that, depending on our commitments with respect to certain kinds of knowledge and notions of personhood, it might be the case that no being—God included—could instantiate both. In this paper, I lay out and motivate this claim before going on to consider a variety of responses—some more plausible than (...)
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    Worship and Threshold Obligations: Jeremy Gwiazda.Jeremy Gwiazda - 2011 - Religious Studies 47 (4):521-525.
    In this reply to Tim Bayne and Yujin Nagasawa, I defend the possibility of a maximal-excellence account of the grounding of the obligation to worship God. I do not offer my own account of the obligation to worship God; rather I argue that the major criticism fails. Thus maximal-excellence can ground an obligation to worship God.
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    Augustinian Perfect Being Theology and the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob.Edward Wierenga - 2011 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 69 (2):139-151.
    All of the ingredients for what has become known as Anselmian perfect being theology were present already in the thought of St. Augustine. This paper develops that thesis by calling attention to various claims Augustine makes. It then asks whether there are principled reasons for determining which properties the greatest possible being has and whether an account of what contributes to greatness can settle the question whether the greatest possible being is the same as the God of Abraham, Isaac, and (...)
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  9. Infinity Goes Up on Trial: Must Immortality Be Meaningless?Timothy Chappell - 2009 - European Journal of Philosophy 17 (1):30-44.
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