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Tom L. Beauchamp (1979). Principles of Biomedical Ethics.

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  1.  17
    Therapy, Enhancement, and Medicine: Challenges for the Doctor–Patient Relationship and Patient Safety.James J. Delaney & David Martin - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 146 (4):831-844.
    There are ethical guidelines that form the foundation of the traditional doctor–patient relationship in medicine. Health care providers are under special obligations to their patients. These include obligations to disclose information, to propose alternative treatments that allow patients to make decisions based on their own values, and to have special concern for patients’ best interests. Furthermore, patients know that these obligations exist and so come to their physicians with a significant level of trust. In this sense, therapeutic medicine significantly differs (...)
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  2.  16
    Relevant Information and Informed Consent in Research: In Defense of the Subjective Standard of Disclosure.Vilius Dranseika, Jan Piasecki & Marcin Waligora - 2017 - Science and Engineering Ethics 23 (1):215-225.
    In this article, we seek to contribute to the debate on the requirement of disclosure in the context of informed consent for research. We defend the subjective standard of disclosure and describe ways to implement this standard in research practice. We claim that the researcher should make an effort to find out what kinds of information are likely to be relevant for those consenting to research. This invites researchers to take empirical survey information seriously, attempt to understand the cultural context, (...)
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  3.  8
    Chronic Patients’ Autonomy in Iranian Hospitals: A Qualitative Study.Hossein Ebrahimi, Efat Sadeghian, Naeimeh Seyedfatemi & Eesa Mohammadi - 2017 - Ethics and Behavior 27 (1):74-87.
    The autonomy of chronic patients in Iranian hospitals is challenged by impaired functioning resulting from chronic illness, a negative image in society, and effects related to hospitalization. Comprehensive interviews and observations of 34 patients, nurses, and physicians were performed to assess the autonomy of chronic patients in Iran. Conceptualization, constant comparison, and the combination of data resulted in the identification of 5 main categories related to autonomy: welcoming paternalism, self-expression, self-proof, shared decision making, and self-determination. Authority scrambling was a central (...)
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  4.  12
    Reconsidering Counselling and Consent.David R. Hall & Anton A. Niekerk - 2017 - Developing World Bioethics 17 (1):4-10.
    In the current era patient autonomy is enormously important. However, recently there has also been some movement back to ensure that trust in the doctor's skill, knowledge and virtue is not excluded in the process. These new nuances of informed consent have been referred to by terms such as beneficent paternalism, experience-based paternalism and we would add virtuous paternalism. The purpose of this paper is to consider the history and current problematic nature of counselling and consent. Starting with the tradition (...)
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  5.  39
    Sex in Medicine: What Stands in the Way of Credibility?Mari Mikkola - 2017 - Topoi 36 (3):479-488.
    Childfree females encounter greater obstacles in obtaining voluntary sterilizations than childfree males. This paper discusses what might explain this and it proposes that female patients encounter particular credibility deficits that undermine their ability to grant informed consent. In particular, the paper explores Miranda Fricker’s recent suggestion that members of structurally disadvantaged groups encounter a particular sort of injustice that harms them in their capacity as knowers: they sustain testimonial injustice. The task of the paper is to investigate whether and in (...)
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  6.  20
    Developing a Scientific Virtue-Based Approach to Science Ethics Training.Robert T. Pennock & Michael O’Rourke - 2017 - Science and Engineering Ethics 23 (1):243-262.
    Responsible conduct of research training typically includes only a subset of the issues that ought to be included in science ethics and sometimes makes ethics appear to be a set of externally imposed rules rather than something intrinsic to scientific practice. A new approach to science ethics training based upon Pennock’s notion of the scientific virtues may help avoid such problems. This paper motivates and describes three implementations—theory-centered, exemplar-centered, and concept-centered—that we have developed in courses and workshops to introduce students (...)
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  7.  15
    The Principle-Based Method of Practical Ethics.Georg Spielthenner - 2017 - Health Care Analysis 25 (3):275-289.
    This paper is about the methodology of doing practical ethics. There is a variety of methods employed in ethics. One of them is the principle-based approach, which has an established place in ethical reasoning. In everyday life, we often judge the rightness and wrongness of actions by their conformity to principles, and the appeal to principles plays a significant role in practical ethics, too. In this paper, I try to provide a better understanding of the nature of principle-based reasoning. To (...)
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  8.  45
    Basing Science Ethics on Respect for Human Dignity.Mehmet Aközer & Emel Aközer - 2016 - Science and Engineering Ethics 22 (6):1627-1647.
    A “no ethics” principle has long been prevalent in science and has demotivated deliberation on scientific ethics. This paper argues the following: An understanding of a scientific “ethos” based on actual “value preferences” and “value repugnances” prevalent in the scientific community permits and demands critical accounts of the “no ethics” principle in science. The roots of this principle may be traced to a repugnance of human dignity, which was instilled at a historical breaking point in the interrelation between science and (...)
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  9.  56
    Everyday Ethics in Professional Life: Social Work as Ethics Work.Sarah Banks - 2016 - Ethics and Social Welfare 10 (1):35-52.
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  10.  15
    Reflexive Principlism as an Effective Approach for Developing Ethical Reasoning in Engineering.Jonathan Beever & Andrew O. Brightman - 2016 - Science and Engineering Ethics 22 (1):275-291.
    An important goal of teaching ethics to engineering students is to enhance their ability to make well-reasoned ethical decisions in their engineering practice: a goal in line with the stated ethical codes of professional engineering organizations. While engineering educators have explored a wide range of methodologies for teaching ethics, a satisfying model for developing ethical reasoning skills has not been adopted broadly. In this paper we argue that a principlist-based approach to ethical reasoning is uniquely suited to engineering ethics education. (...)
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  11. The Porosity of Autonomy: Social and Biological Constitution of the Patient in Biomedicine.Jonathan Beever & Nicolae Morar - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (2):34-45.
    The nature and role of the patient in biomedicine comprise issues central to bioethical inquiry. Given its developmental history grounded firmly in a backlash against 20th-century cases of egregious human subjects abuse, contemporary medical bioethics has come to rely on a fundamental assumption: the unit of care is the autonomous self-directing patient. In this article we examine first the structure of the feminist social critique of autonomy. Then we show that a parallel argument can be made against relational autonomy as (...)
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  12.  7
    Moralityisabout Values and Character. A Commentary on Backström and Nykänen . Collectivity, Evil and the Dynamics of Moral Value.Stephen Buetow - 2016 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 22 (4):477-478.
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  13.  50
    Free Choice and Patient Best Interests.Emma Bullock - 2016 - Health Care Analysis 24 (4):374-392.
    In medical practice, the doctrine of informed consent is generally understood to have priority over the medical practitioner’s duty of care to her patient. A common consequentialist argument for the prioritisation of informed consent above the duty of care involves the claim that respect for a patient’s free choice is the best way of protecting that patient’s best interests; since the patient has a special expertise over her values and preferences regarding non-medical goods she is ideally placed to make a (...)
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  14.  45
    Mandatory Disclosure and Medical Paternalism.Emma Bullock - 2016 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 19 (2):409-424.
    Medical practitioners are duty-bound to tell their patients the truth about their medical conditions, along with the risks and benefits of proposed treatments. Some patients, however, would rather not receive medical information. A recent response to this tension has been to argue that that the disclosure of medical information is not optional. As such, patients do not have permission to refuse medical information. In this paper I argue that, depending on the context, the disclosure of medical information can undermine the (...)
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  15.  24
    Memory Interventions in the Criminal Justice System: Some Practical Ethical Considerations.Laura Y. Cabrera & Bernice S. Elger - 2016 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 13 (1):95-103.
    In recent years, discussion around memory modification interventions has gained attention. However, discussion around the use of memory interventions in the criminal justice system has been mostly absent. In this paper we start by highlighting the importance memory has for human well-being and personal identity, as well as its role within the criminal forensic setting; in particular, for claiming and accepting legal responsibility, for moral learning, and for retribution. We provide examples of memory interventions that are currently available for medical (...)
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  16.  12
    Towards Substantive Standardization: Ethical Rules as Ethical Presumptions.Benjamin Chan - 2016 - HEC Forum 28 (2):175-185.
    This paper argues that substantive ethical rules serve a critical ethical function, even in those cases where we should deviate from those rules. Assuming that the rules are valid provides decision-makers with the context essential to reaching a well-justified decision. Recognizing this helps to reconcile two attractive but incompatible positions regarding the evaluation of healthcare ethics consultants. The first position is that ethical rules can validly be used to evaluate the quality of consultants’ advice, ensuring conformity to standards promoted by (...)
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  17.  33
    A Survey of Expectations About the Role of Robots in Robot-Assisted Therapy for Children with ASD: Ethical Acceptability, Trust, Sociability, Appearance, and Attachment.Mark Coeckelbergh, Cristina Pop, Ramona Simut, Andreea Peca, Sebastian Pintea, Daniel David & Bram Vanderborght - 2016 - Science and Engineering Ethics 22 (1):47-65.
    The use of robots in therapy for children with autism spectrum disorder raises issues concerning the ethical and social acceptability of this technology and, more generally, about human–robot interaction. However, usually philosophical papers on the ethics of human–robot-interaction do not take into account stakeholders’ views; yet it is important to involve stakeholders in order to render the research responsive to concerns within the autism and autism therapy community. To support responsible research and innovation in this field, this paper identifies a (...)
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  18.  19
    An Ethical Issue Scale for Community Pharmacy Setting : Development and Validation.Tatjana Crnjanski, Dusanka Krajnovic, Ivana Tadic, Svetlana Stojkov & Mirko Savic - 2016 - Science and Engineering Ethics 22 (2):497-508.
    Many problems that arise when providing pharmacy services may contain some ethical components and the aims of this study were to develop and validate a scale that could assess difficulties of ethical issues, as well as the frequency of those occurrences in everyday practice of community pharmacists. Development and validation of the scale was conducted in three phases: generating items for the initial survey instrument after qualitative analysis; defining the design and format of the instrument; validation of the instrument. The (...)
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  19.  13
    What Do the Various Principles of Justice Mean Within the Concept of Benefit Sharing?Bege Dauda, Yvonne Denier & Kris Dierickx - 2016 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 13 (2):281-293.
    The concept of benefit sharing pertains to the act of giving something in return to the participants, communities, and the country that have participated in global health research or bioprospecting activities. One of the key concerns of benefit sharing is the ethical justifications or reasons to support the practice of the concept in global health research and bioprospecting. This article evaluates one of such ethical justifications and its meaning to benefit sharing, namely justice. We conducted a systematic review to map (...)
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  20.  7
    Contested Technologies and Design for Values: The Case of Shale Gas.Marloes Dignum, Aad Correljé, Eefje Cuppen, Udo Pesch & Behnam Taebi - 2016 - Science and Engineering Ethics 22 (4):1171-1191.
    The introduction of new energy technologies may lead to public resistance and contestation. It is often argued that this phenomenon is caused by an inadequate inclusion of relevant public values in the design of technology. In this paper we examine the applicability of the value sensitive design approach. While VSD was primarily introduced for incorporating values in technological design, our focus in this paper is expanded towards the design of the institutions surrounding these technologies, as well as the design of (...)
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  21.  14
    Duty to Inform and Informed Consent in Diagnostic Radiology: How Ethics and Law Can Better Guide Practice.Victoria Doudenkova & Jean-Christophe Bélisle Pipon - 2016 - HEC Forum 28 (1):75-94.
    Although there is consensus on the fact that ionizing radiation used in radiological examinations can affect health, the stochastic nature of risk makes it difficult to anticipate and assess specific health implications for patients. The issue of radiation protection is peculiar as any dosage received in life is cumulative, the sensitivity to radiation is highly variable from one person to another, and between 20 % and 50 % of radiological examinations appear not to be necessary. In this context, one might (...)
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  22.  25
    Should Eudaimonia Structure Professional Virtue?Andreas Eriksen - 2016 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 50 (4):605-618.
    This article develops a eudaimonistic account of professional virtue. Using the case of teaching, the article argues that professional virtue requires that role holders care about the ends of their work. Care is understood in terms of an investment of the self. Virtuous role holders are invested in their practice in a way that makes professional excellence part of their own good. Failure to care about the ends of professional practice reveals a lack of appreciation of the value of professional (...)
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  23.  14
    Ethical Practice Under Accountable Care.Abraham D. Graber, Asha Bhandary & Matthew Rizzo - 2016 - HEC Forum 28 (2):115-128.
    Accountable Care Organizations are a key mechanism of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. ACOs will influence incentives for providers, who must understand these changes to make well-considered treatment decisions. Our paper defines an ethical framework for physician decisions and action within ACOs. Emerging ethical pressures providers will face as members of an ACO were classified under major headings representing three of the four principles of bioethics: autonomy, beneficence, and justice. Conflicts include a bias against transient populations, a motive (...)
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  24.  7
    Normative Rahmenbedingungen der Rekrutierung Und Nutzung Extrahierter Zähne in Forschung Und LehreNormative Framework for the Recruitment and Use of Extracted Teeth in Research and Teaching.Dominik Groß, Christian Lenk & Brigitte Utzig - 2016 - Ethik in der Medizin 28 (1).
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  25.  18
    Experimental Evidence Showing That Physician Guidance Promotes Perceptions of Physician Empathy.Daniel Russell Hans, Priyanka Dubé & Jason Adam Wasserman - 2016 - Ajob Empirical Bioethics 7 (3):135-139.
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  26.  9
    Einwilligungsfähigkeit: Inhärente Fähigkeit Oder Ethisches Urteil?Decision-Making Capacity: Inherent Ability or Ethical Judgment?Helena Hermann, Manuel Trachsel & Nikola Biller-Andorno - 2016 - Ethik in der Medizin 28 (2).
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  27.  15
    Assessing Baselines for Identifying Harm: Tricky Cases and Childhood.Monique Jonas - 2016 - Res Publica 22 (4):387-404.
    Baselines are commonly used to enable harm identification. The temporal, the counterfactual and the duty-based normative baselines are the most prominent. Each of these captures an aspect of common conceptions of what it is to harm and be harmed. However, each baseline also fails to deliver workable identifications of harm when presented with certain types of case. Problematic cases are found readily in childhood, a venue in which harm identification is often called for. Without a reliable means of identifying harm (...)
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  28.  23
    Informed Consent in Implantable BCI Research: Identifying Risks and Exploring Meaning.Eran Klein - 2016 - Science and Engineering Ethics 22 (5):1299-1317.
    Implantable brain–computer interface technology is an expanding area of engineering research now moving into clinical application. Ensuring meaningful informed consent in implantable BCI research is an ethical imperative. The emerging and rapidly evolving nature of implantable BCI research makes identification of risks, a critical component of informed consent, a challenge. In this paper, 6 core risk domains relevant to implantable BCI research are identified—short and long term safety, cognitive and communicative impairment, inappropriate expectations, involuntariness, affective impairment, and privacy and security. (...)
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  29.  13
    The ‘Civic-Minded’ Professional? An Exploration Through Hannah Arendt’s ‘Vita Activa’.Carolin Kreber - 2016 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 48 (2):123-137.
    Recent reform initiatives calling for ‘civic’ professionalism can be seen as a response to the widely reported decline in public trust in the professions and an attempt to partially remedy this problem through a more publically engaged professionalism. The author draws on the political philosophy of Hannah Arendt, identifying the strong, albeit in the professionalism literature rarely acknowledged, affinities between civic professionalism and her concept of action as freedom through public deliberation. Using the three modalities of the active life that (...)
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  30.  14
    The Ethics and Sustainability of Capture Fisheries and Aquaculture.Mimi Lam - 2016 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 29 (1):35-65.
    The global seafood industry is a vital source of food, income, livelihoods, and culture. Seafood demand is steadily rising due to growth in the global human population, affluence, and per capita consumption. Seafood supply is also growing, despite declining wild fish stocks, with phenomenal advances in aquaculture, that is, the cultivation of aquatic organisms. Aquaculture supplied 42 % of the world’s fish in 2012 and is forecast to eclipse capture fisheries production by 2030. The balance between these two seafood production (...)
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  31.  38
    Addiction, Autonomy, and Informed Consent: On and Off the Garden Path.Neil Levy - 2016 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 41 (1):56-73.
    Several ethicists have argued that research trials and treatment programs that involve the provision of drugs to addicts are prima facie unethical, because addicts can’t refuse the offer of drugs and therefore can’t give informed consent to participation. In response, several people have pointed out that addiction does not cause a compulsion to use drugs. However, since we know that addiction impairs autonomy, this response is inadequate. In this paper, I advance a stronger defense of the capacity of addicts to (...)
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  32.  16
    Farming Ethics in Practice: From Freedom to Professional Moral Autonomy for Farmers.Franck L. B. Meijboom & Frans R. Stafleu - 2016 - Agriculture and Human Values 33 (2):403-414.
    Food production, water management, land use, and animal and public health are all topics of extensive public debate. These themes are linked to the core activities of the agricultural sector, and more specifically to the work of farmers. Nonetheless, the ethical discussions are mostly initiated by interest groups in society rather than by farmers. At least in Europe, consumer organizations and animal welfare and environmental organizations are more present in the public debate than farmers. This is not how it should (...)
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  33. The Ethics of Big Data: Current and Foreseeable Issues in Biomedical Contexts.Brent Mittelstadt & Luciano Floridi - 2016 - Science and Engineering Ethics 22 (2):303-341.
    The capacity to collect and analyse data is growing exponentially. Referred to as ‘Big Data’, this scientific, social and technological trend has helped create destabilising amounts of information, which can challenge accepted social and ethical norms. Big Data remains a fuzzy idea, emerging across social, scientific, and business contexts sometimes seemingly related only by the gigantic size of the datasets being considered. As is often the case with the cutting edge of scientific and technological progress, understanding of the ethical implications (...)
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  34.  18
    Bioethics as a Governance Practice.Jonathan Montgomery - 2016 - Health Care Analysis 24 (1):3-23.
    Bioethics can be considered as a topic, an academic discipline, a field of study, an enterprise in persuasion. The historical specificity of the forms bioethics takes is significant, and raises questions about some of these approaches. Bioethics can also be considered as a governance practice, with distinctive institutions and structures. The forms this practice takes are also to a degree country specific, as the paper illustrates by drawing on the author’s UK experience. However, the UNESCO Universal Declaration on Bioethics can (...)
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  35.  34
    Lay Attitudes Toward Deception in Medicine: Theoretical Considerations and Empirical Evidence.Jonathan Pugh, Guy Kahane, Hannah Maslen & Julian Savulescu - 2016 - Ajob Empirical Bioethics 7 (1):31-38.
    Background: There is a lack of empirical data on lay attitudes toward different sorts of deception in medicine. However, lay attitudes toward deception should be taken into account when we consider whether deception is ever permissible in a medical context. The objective of this study was to examine lay attitudes of U.S. citizens toward different sorts of deception across different medical contexts. Methods: A one-time online survey was administered to U.S. users of the Amazon “Mechanical Turk” website. Participants were asked (...)
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  36.  6
    Applying “Place” to Research Ethics and Cultural Competence/Humility Training.Dianne Quigley - 2016 - Journal of Academic Ethics 14 (1):19-33.
    Research ethics principles and regulations typically have been applied to the protection of individual human subjects. Yet, new paradigms of research that include the place-based community and cultural groups as partners or participants of environmental research interventions, in particular, require attention to place-based identities and geographical contexts. This paper argues the importance of respecting “place” within human subjects protections applied to communities and cultural groups as part of a critical need for research ethics and cultural competence training for graduate research (...)
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  37.  11
    Informierte Einwilligung in der Demenzforschung. Eine Qualitative Studie Zum Informationsverständnis von ProbandenInformed Consent in Dementia Research. A Qualitative Study on Participants’ Understanding of Information.Holger Schütz, Bert Heinrichs, Michael Fuchs & Andreas Bauer - 2016 - Ethik in der Medizin 28 (2).
    Background: Informed consent is a legal as well as ethical prerequisite in clinical research. For dementia research, informed consent can be a problem if subjects with dementia, whose capacity for understanding and thus also decision making might be limited, are to be exam- ined. This might result in exclusion of dementia patients from research, as capacity for understanding and decision making are often equated with the ability for rational decision making. However, this valuation has been criticized at times for attaching (...)
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  38.  3
    Dogs and Monsters: Moral Status Claims in the Fiction of Dean Koontz.Stephen W. Smith - 2016 - Journal of Medical Humanities 37 (1):35-51.
  39.  15
    Cancer Clinical Trial Participants' Assessment of Risk and Benefit.Connie M. Ulrich, Sarah J. Ratcliffe, Gwenyth R. Wallen, Qiuping Zhou, Kathleen Knafl & Christine Grady - 2016 - Ajob Empirical Bioethics 7 (1):8-16.
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  40.  22
    An Ethical Framework for Evaluating Experimental Technology.Ibo van de Poel - 2016 - Science and Engineering Ethics 22 (3):667-686.
    How are we to appraise new technological developments that may bring revolutionary social changes? Currently this is often done by trying to predict or anticipate social consequences and to use these as a basis for moral and regulatory appraisal. Such an approach can, however, not deal with the uncertainties and unknowns that are inherent in social changes induced by technological development. An alternative approach is proposed that conceives of the introduction of new technologies into society as a social experiment. An (...)
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  41.  13
    Paternalism and Populations.Tom Walker - 2016 - Public Health Ethics 9 (1):46-54.
    It is relatively uncontroversial that some public health policies are paternalistic. Furthermore, that they are paternalistic is often taken to show that they are morally wrong. In this article I challenge this position. The article starts by arguing that given standard definitions of paternalism it is unclear why such policies count as paternalistic. Whilst it might appear that they impose restrictions on what individuals can, or cannot, do for their own good, this is not the case. The reason for this (...)
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  42.  18
    Community Epistemic Capacity.Ian Werkheiser - 2016 - Social Epistemology 30 (1):25-44.
    Despite US policy documents which recommend that in areas of environmental risk, interaction between scientific experts and the public move beyond the so-called “Decide, Announce, and Defend model,” many current public involvement policies still do not guarantee meaningful public participation. In response to this problem, various attempts have been made to define what counts as sufficient or meaningful participation and free informed consent from those affected. Though defining “meaningfulness” is a complex task, this paper explores one under-examined dimension that concerns (...)
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  43.  23
    Consenting to Geoengineering.Pak-Hang Wong - 2016 - Philosophy and Technology 29 (2):173-188.
    Researchers have explored questions concerning public participation and consent in geoengineering governance. Yet, the notion of consent has received little attention from researchers, and it is rarely discussed explicitly, despite being prescribed as a normative requirement for geoengineering research and being used in rejecting some geoengineering options. As it is noted in the leading geoengineering governance principles, i.e. the Oxford Principles, there are different conceptions of consent; the idea of consent ought to be unpacked more carefully if, and when, we (...)
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  44.  68
    A Not-So-Gentle Refutation of the Defence of Homeopathy.Jakub Zawiła-Niedźwiecki & Jacek Olender - 2016 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 13 (1):21-25.
    In a recent paper, Levy, Gadd, Kerridge, and Komesaroff attempt to defend the ethicality of homeopathy by attacking the utilitarian ethical framework as a basis for medical ethics and by introducing a distinction between evidence-based medicine and modern science. This paper demonstrates that their argumentation is not only insufficient to achieve that goal but also incorrect. Utilitarianism is not required to show that homeopathic practice is unethical; indeed, any normative basis of medical ethics will make it unethical, as a defence (...)
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  45. Placebo Effects and Informed Consent.Mark Alfano - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics 15 (10):3-12.
    The concepts of placebos and placebo effects refer to extremely diverse phenomena. I recommend dissolving the concepts of placebos and placebo effects into loosely related groups of specific mechanisms, including expectation-fulfillment, classical conditioning, and attentional-somatic feedback loops. If this approach is on the right track, it has three main implications for the ethics of informed consent. First, because of the expectation-fulfillment mechanism, the process of informing cannot be considered independently from the potential effects of treatment. Obtaining informed consent influences the (...)
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  46.  30
    Physician-Assisted Death with Limited Access to Palliative Care.Joaquín Barutta & Jochen Vollmann - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (8):652-654.
  47.  29
    Between Relativism and Imperialism: Navigating Moral Diversity in Cross‐Cultural Bioethics.Daniel Beck - 2015 - Developing World Bioethics 15 (3):162-171.
    The need for explicit theoretical reflection on cross-cultural bioethics continues to grow as the spread of communication technologies and increased human migration has made interactions between medical professionals and patients from different cultural backgrounds much more common. I claim that this need presents us with the following dilemma. On the one hand, we do not want to operate according to an imperialist ethical framework that denies and silences the legitimacy of cultural values other than our own. On the other hand, (...)
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  48.  31
    Reconceptualising the Doctor–Patient Relationship: Recognising the Role of Trust in Contemporary Health Care.Zara Bending - 2015 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 12 (2):189-202.
    The conception of the doctor–patient relationship under Australian law has followed British common law tradition whereby the relationship is founded in a contractual exchange. By contrast, this article presents a rationale and framework for an alternative model—a “Trust Model”—for implementation into law to more accurately reflect the contemporary therapeutic dynamic. The framework has four elements: an assumption that professional conflicts with patient safety, motivated by financial or personal interests, should be avoided; an onus on doctors to disclose these conflicts; a (...)
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  49.  7
    Are Smokers Less Deserving of Expensive Treatment? A Randomised Controlled Trial That Goes Beyond Official Values.Joar Björk, Niels Lynøe & Niklas Juth - 2015 - BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):28.
    To investigate whether Swedish physicians, contrary to Swedish health care policy, employ considerations of patient responsibility for illness when rationing expensive treatments.
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  50.  4
    Talking More About Talking Cures: Cognitive Behavioural Therapy and Informed Consent.C. R. Blease - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (9):750-755.
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