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Principles of Biomedical Ethics

Oxford University Press (1979)

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  1. Overcoming the Limits of Empathic Concern: The Case for Availability and its Application to the Medical Domain.Elodie Malbois & Christine Clavien - 2020 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 23 (2):191-203.
    Empathic concern is essential to our social lives because it motivates helping behavior. It has, however, well-known shortcomings such as its limitation in scope. Here, we highlight a further shortcoming of empathic concern: it contributes little to understanding the relevant features of complex social situations, and unaided by further cognitive inputs, likely fails to produce effective helping. We then elaborate on the conditions needed for an accurate assessment of others’ situations: the ability to pay attention and try to understand others (...)
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  • Psychosis, Vulnerability, and the Moral Significance of Biomedical Innovation in Psychiatry. Why Ethicists Should Join Efforts.Paolo Corsico - 2020 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 23 (2):269-279.
    The study of the neuroscience and genomics of mental illness are increasingly intertwined. This is mostly due to the translation of medical technologies into psychiatry and to technological convergence. This article focuses on psychosis. I argue that the convergence of neuroscience and genomics in the context of psychosis is morally problematic, and that ethics scholarship should go beyond the identification of a number of ethical, legal, and social issues. My argument is composed of two strands. First, I argue that we (...)
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  • Richard Dean: The Value of Humanity in Kant’s Moral Theory: Clarendon Press, Oxford, 2006, Pp. X + 267. Cloth, £28.12.Victor Chidi Wolemonwu - 2020 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 23 (2):221-226.
    This is critical review of Richard Dean’ book, The Value of Humanity in Kant’s Moral Theory. Dean’s book was evaluated, and some of his interpretations of Kant were critiqued. However, it concludes that Dean’s book is illuminating especially, as regards the distinction he made between consent and informed consent and their roles in biomedical practice.
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  • About the Right to Be Ill.Jacek Halasz - 2018 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 21 (1):113-123.
    The article raises the issue of ‘the right to be ill’, formulated by Tadeusz Kielanowski, a Polish physician and humanist. According to him, the right to health should be supplemented by the principle which would serve the protection of people with diseases or disabilities. One-sided interpretation of ‘the right to health’ may result in various forms of intolerance and discrimination. This paper presents what dangers Kielanowski recognized and explains why his approach was considered to be a novelty; what the idea (...)
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  • Finding Their Voices Again: A Media Project Offers a Floor for Vulnerable Patients, Clients and the Socially Deprived. [REVIEW]Ralf Stutzki, Markus Weber & Stella Reiter-Theil - 2013 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (4):739-750.
    ‘DU bist Radio’ (DBR) is an award winning [DBR has been awarded with the “Catholic Media Award of the German Bishops Conference, Prädikat WERTvoll” (2011), the Suisse “Media Prize Aargau/Solothurn” (2010), the German “Alternative Media Award” (2009) and was nominated for the “Prix Europa” (2009)] monthly radio format that goes on air on three Swiss radio stations. The purpose of this program which was first broadcast in 2009 is the development of a new media format which—without applying any journalistic (or (...)
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  • Autonomy-Based Arguments Against Physician-Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia: A Critique. [REVIEW]Manne Sjöstrand, Gert Helgesson, Stefan Eriksson & Niklas Juth - 2013 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (2):225-230.
    Respect for autonomy is typically considered a key reason for allowing physician assisted suicide and euthanasia. However, several recent papers have claimed this to be grounded in a misconception of the normative relevance of autonomy. It has been argued that autonomy is properly conceived of as a value, and that this makes assisted suicide as well as euthanasia wrong, since they destroy the autonomy of the patient. This paper evaluates this line of reasoning by investigating the conception of valuable autonomy. (...)
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  • Patient Autonomy and Choice in Healthcare: Self-Testing Devices as a Case in Point.Anna-Marie Greaney, Dónal P. O’Mathúna & P. Anne Scott - 2012 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 15 (4):383-395.
    This paper aims to critique the phenomenon of advanced patient autonomy and choice in healthcare within the specific context of self-testing devices. A growing number of self-testing medical devices are currently available for home use. The premise underpinning many of these devices is that they assist individuals to be more autonomous in the assessment and management of their health. Increased patient autonomy is assumed to be a good thing. We take issue with this assumption and argue that self-testing provides a (...)
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  • Reproductive Autonomous Choice – A Cherished Illusion? Reproductive Autonomy Examined in the Context of Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis.Kristin Zeiler - 2004 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 7 (2):175-183.
    Enhancement of autonomous choice may be considered as an important reason for facilitating the use of genetic tests such as preimplantation genetic diagnosis. The principle of respect for autonomy is a crucial component not only of Western liberal traditions but also of Western bioethics. This is especially so in bioethical discussions and analyses of clinical encounters within medicine. On the basis of an analysis of qualitative research interviews performed with British, Italian and Swedish geneticists and gynaecologists on ethical aspects of (...)
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  • Distance, Dialogue and Reflection: Interpersonal Reflective Equilibrium as Method for Professional Ethics Education.Mariëtte van den Hoven & Jos Kole - 2015 - Journal of Moral Education 44 (2):145-164.
    The method of reflective equilibrium is well known within the domain of moral philosophy, but hardly discussed as a method in professional ethics education. We argue that an interpersonal version of RE is very promising for professional ethics education. We offer several arguments to support this claim. The first group of arguments focus on a changed practice that is more team-oriented, inter-professional and aims at shared decision-making with patients and clients. The second group of arguments relate to the core aim (...)
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  • Informed Consent for Clinical Treatment in Low-Income Setting: Evaluating the Relationship Between Satisfying Consent and Extent of Recall of Consent Information.Ikenna I. Nnabugwu, Fredrick O. Ugwumba, Emeka I. Udeh, Solomon K. Anyimba & Oyiogu F. Ozoemena - 2017 - BMC Medical Ethics 18 (1):69.
    Treatment informed consent aims to preserve the autonomy of patients in the clinician – patient relationship so as to ensure valid consent. An acceptable method of evaluating understanding of consent information is by assessing the extent of recall by patients of the pieces information believed to have been passed across. When concerns are not satisfactorily addressed from the patients’ perspective, recall of consent information may be low. This study is a questionnaire – based cross – sectional interview of consecutive adult (...)
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  • Schizophrenia, Mental Capacity, and Rational Suicide.Jeanette Hewitt - 2010 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 31 (1):63-77.
    A diagnosis of schizophrenia is often taken to denote a state of global irrationality within the psychiatric paradigm, wherein psychotic phenomena are seen to equate with a lack of mental capacity. However, the little research that has been undertaken on mental capacity in psychiatric patients shows that people with schizophrenia are more likely to experience isolated, rather than constitutive, irrationality and are therefore not necessarily globally incapacitated. Rational suicide has not been accepted as a valid choice for people with schizophrenia (...)
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  • Control Groups in Psychosocial Intervention Research: Ethical and Methodological Issues.Jason B. Luoma & Linda L. Street - 2002 - Ethics and Behavior 12 (1):1-30.
    This article summarizes a National Institute of Mental Health workshop that was convened to address the ethical and methodological issues that arise when conducting controlled psychosocial interventions research and introduces 6 thoughtful and inspiring papers prepared by workshop participants. These papers, on topics ranging from informed consent to ethnic minority issues, reflect the depth and breadth of expertise represented by the multidisciplinary group of scientists and ethicists present at the meeting. More extensive follow-up, particularly from federal research applications and publications, (...)
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  • Ethical Aspects of Vulnerability in Research.Elisabeth Weisser-Lohmann - 2012 - Poiesis and Praxis 9 (1-2):157-162.
    In connection with research on humans, the term “vulnerability” is only appropriate to identify the special need for protection of certain sections of the population and individuals, if this term refers to the additional risk of certain groups of subjects. Authors who focus on the additional risk suffering of a subject group when defining vulnerability succeed in considering the specific worthiness of protection in a context-sensitive way. The attempt to define the risk–benefit assessment for vulnerable subject groups on a binding (...)
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  • Mapping the Ethical Landscape of Carbon Capture and Storage.Philip Boucher & Clair Gough - 2012 - Poiesis and Praxis 9 (3-4):249-270.
    This article describes a method of scoping for potential ethical contentions within a resource constrained research environment where actor participation and bottom–up analysis is precluded. Instead of reverting to a top–down analytical structure, a data-led process is devised. This imitates a bottom–up analytic structure in the absence of the direct participation of actors, culminating in the construction of a map of the ethical landscape; a high-resolution ethical matrix of coded interpretations of various actors’ ethical framings of the technology. Despite its (...)
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  • Formulating an Ethics of Pharmaceutical Disinvestment.Jessica Pace, Tracey-Lea Laba, Marie-Paul Nisingizwe & Wendy Lipworth - 2020 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 17 (1):75-86.
    There is growing interest among pharmaceutical policymakers in how to “disinvest” from subsidized medicines. This is due to both the rapidly rising costs of healthcare and the increasing use of accelerated and conditional reimbursement pathways which mean that medicines are being subsidized on the basis of less robust evidence of safety and efficacy. It is crucial that disinvestment decisions are morally sound and socially legitimate, but there is currently no framework to facilitate this. We therefore reviewed the bioethics literature in (...)
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  • Do Unknown Risks Preclude Informed Consent?David Rudge - 2003 - Essays in Philosophy 4 (2):5.
    Allen Buchanan and Daniel Brock, in a widely influential account, Deciding for Others , advocate a sliding scale approach to the determination of whether a patient is competent to make a decision regarding his/her health care. An analysis of two critiques of their position , Wicclair ) reveals a tacit presumption by all of these authors that the greater cognitive challenge often posed by high risk therapies constitutes grounds for an elevated standard of competence. This presumption cannot be consistently maintained (...)
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  • Human Nature: A Foundation for Palliative Care: Original Article.Beverly J. B. Whelton - 2008 - Nursing Philosophy 9 (2):77-88.
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  • Informierte Einwilligung in der Demenzforschung. Eine qualitative Studie zum Informationsverständnis von Probanden.Holger Schütz, Bert Heinrichs, Michael Fuchs & Andreas Bauer - 2016 - Ethik in der Medizin 28 (2):91-106.
    Background: Informed consent is a legal as well as ethical prerequisite in clinical research. For dementia research, informed consent can be a problem if subjects with dementia, whose capacity for understanding and thus also decision making might be limited, are to be exam- ined. This might result in exclusion of dementia patients from research, as capacity for understanding and decision making are often equated with the ability for rational decision making. However, this valuation has been criticized at times for attaching (...)
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  • Rationales for Organ Donation: Charity or Duty?David A. Peters - 1986 - Journal of Medical Humanities 7 (2):106-121.
    Media appeals encouraging people to sign organ donor cards suggest that donating one's own organs after death or donating the organs of a deceased family member is an act of charity, i.e., something which it would be meritorious for people to do but not wrong to avoid. This paper argues to the contrary that posthumous organ donation is a moral duty, a duty of the type that rests at the base of recently enacted state “Good Samaritan” laws which require a (...)
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  • Race, Religion, and Informed Consent - Lessons From Social Science.Dayna Bowen Matthew - 2008 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (1):150-173.
    Patients belonging to ethnic, racial, and religious minorities have been all but excluded from the legal academy's on-going conversation about informed consent. This article repairs that egregious omission. It begins by observing the narrowing of ethical justifications that underlie our informed consent law, tracing the ethical literature from the ancients to modern formulations of autonomy-centered models. Next, this article reviews the vast body of empirical data available in social science literature, that demonstrates how distinct from the autonomy model the broad (...)
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  • What's in a Name?Sheila E. Horn - 1985 - Journal of Medical Humanities 6 (2):99-108.
    Medical students pose as physicians during clinical training. This article presents three cases where students justify misrepresenting their status for different reasons: self-concern for career, necessity for clinical training, and belief that the truth could cause undue psychological stress in the patient. The author suggests that serious consequences of this practice should be constantly reviewed in a critical light.
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  • Nurses' Attitudes to Euthanasia: The Influence of Empirical Studies and Methodological Concerns on Nursing Practice.Janet Holt - 2008 - Nursing Philosophy 9 (4):257-272.
    This paper introduces the controversy surrounding active voluntary euthanasia and describes the legal position on euthanasia and assisted suicide in the UK. Findings from studies of the nurses' attitudes to euthanasia from the national and international literature are reviewed. There are acknowledged difficulties in carrying out research into attitudes to euthanasia and hence the review of findings from the published studies is followed by a methodological review. This methodological review examines the research design and data collection methods used in the (...)
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  • Normative Rahmenbedingungen der Rekrutierung und Nutzung extrahierter Zähne in Forschung und Lehre.Dominik Groß, Christian Lenk & Brigitte Utzig - 2016 - Ethik in der Medizin 28 (1):21-31.
    ZusammenfassungJeder extrahierte Zahn ist primär Eigentum des betreffenden Patienten und unterliegt dessen autonomiebasiertem Selbstbestimmungsrecht. Diesem weitgehend unstrittigen Sachverhalt steht die praktische Notwendigkeit gegenüber, extrahierte Zähne für Forschung und Lehre bereitzustellen. So ist z. B. die Erprobung neuer Wurzelfüllmaterialien und -techniken ohne den Einsatz extrahierter Zähne ebenso wenig denkbar wie eine zahnbezogene praktische Ausbildung angehender Zahnärzte im Rahmen des universitären Studiums. In jüngster Zeit wurde vermehrt Kritik an der konventionellen Praxis der Rekrutierung und Nutzung extrahierter Zähne geübt. Vor diesem Hintergrund widmet (...)
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  • Currents in Contemporary Ethics.Mary R. Anderlik & Mark A. Rothstein - 2003 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 31 (3):450-454.
  • Autonomy and Enhancement.G. Owen Schaefer, Guy Kahane & Julian Savulescu - 2014 - Neuroethics 7 (2):123-136.
    Some have objected to human enhancement on the grounds that it violates the autonomy of the enhanced. These objections, however, overlook the interesting possibility that autonomy itself could be enhanced. How, exactly, to enhance autonomy is a difficult problem due to the numerous and diverse accounts of autonomy in the literature. Existing accounts of autonomy enhancement rely on narrow and controversial conceptions of autonomy. However, we identify one feature of autonomy common to many mainstream accounts: reasoning ability. Autonomy can then (...)
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  • Consumer Autonomy and Availability of Genetically Modified Food.Helena Siipi & Susanne Uusitalo - 2011 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 24 (2):147-163.
    The European Union’s policies regarding genetically modified food are based on the precautionary principle and the requirement of respecting consumers’ autonomy. We ask whether the requirement of respecting consumers’ autonomy regarding GMF implies that both GMF and non-GMF products should be available in the market. According to one line of thought, consumers’ choices may be autonomous even when the both types of products are not available. A food market with only GMF or only non-GMF products does not strictly speaking compel (...)
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  • Family-Based Consent and Motivation for Cadaveric Organ Donation in China: An Ethical Exploration.Ruiping Fan & Mingxu Wang - 2019 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 44 (5):534-553.
    This essay indicates that Confucian family-based ethics is by no means a stumbling block to organ donation in China. We contend that China should not change to an opt-out consent system in order to enhance donation because a “hard” opt-out system is unethical, and a “soft” opt-out system is unhelpful. We argue that the recently-introduced familist model of motivation for organ donation in mainland China can provide a proper incentive for donation. This model, and the family priority right that this (...)
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  • Autonomy, Consent, and the “Nonideal” Case.Hallvard Lillehammer - 2020 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 45 (3):297-311.
    According to one influential view, requirements to elicit consent for medical interventions and other interactions gain their rationale from the respect we owe to each other as autonomous, or self-governing, rational agents. Yet the popular presumption that consent has a central role to play in legitimate intervention extends beyond the domain of cases where autonomous agency is present to cases where far from fully autonomous agents make choices that, as likely as not, are going to be against their own best (...)
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  • Deciding For When You Can’T Decide: The Medical Treatment Planning and Decisions Act 2016.Courtney Hempton & Neera Bhatia - 2020 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 17 (1):109-120.
    The Australian state of Victoria introduced new legislation regulating medical treatment and associated decision-making in March 2018. In this article we provide an overview of the new Medical Treatment Planning and Decisions Act 2016 and compare it to the former Medical Treatment Act 1988. Most substantially, the new Act provides for persons with relevant decision-making capacity to make decisions in advance regarding their potential future medical care, to take effect in the event they themselves do not have decision-making capacity. Prima (...)
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  • Moral Nature of the Dsm-IV Cluster B Personality Disorders.Louis Charland - 2006 - Journal of Personality Disorders 20 (2):116-125.
    Moral considerations do not appear to play a large role in discussions of the DSM-IV personality disorders and debates about their empirical validity. Yet philosophical analysis reveals that the Cluster B personality disorders, in particular, may in fact be moral rather than clinical conditions. This finding has serious consequences for how they should be treated and by whom.
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  • Ethics and Informed Consent of Vagus Nerve Stimulation (VNS) for Patients with Treatment-Resistant Depression (TRD).Fabrice Jotterand, Shawn M. McClintock, Archie A. Alexander & Mustafa M. Husain - 2010 - Neuroethics 3 (1):13-22.
    Since the Nuremberg trials (1947–1949), informed consent has become central for ethical practice in patient care and biomedical research. Codes of ethics emanating from the Nuremberg Code (1947) recognize the importance of protecting patients and research subjects from abuses, manipulation and deception. Informed consent empowers individuals to autonomously and voluntarily accept or reject participation in either clinical treatment or research. In some cases, however, the underlying mental or physical condition of the individual may alter his or her cognitive abilities and (...)
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  • Christian Integrity Regained: Reformational Worldview Engagement for Everyday Medical Practice.Jon Tilburt, Joel Pacyna & James Rusthoven - 2020 - Christian Bioethics 26 (2):163-176.
    How does one committed to the claims of Christ and a biblical story of redemption live Christianly and navigate the competing worldviews encountered in everyday medical practice? Adopting the practical conceptual framework promoted by Reformed Christian philosopher and theologian Albert Wolters, we argue for an all-encompassing biblical understanding of God’s cosmic redemption plan for the entire creation order in contrast to a more typical sacred/secular duality. We then apply the concepts of structure and direction, drawn from a pretheological understanding of (...)
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  • The Subjects of Ectogenesis: Are “Gestatelings” Fetuses, Newborns, or Neither?Nick Colgrove - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (11):723-726.
    Subjects of ectogenesis—human beings that are developing in artificial wombs (AWs)—share the same moral status as newborns. To demonstrate this, I defend two claims. First, subjects of partial ectogenesis—those that develop in utero for a time before being transferred to AWs—are newborns (in the full sense of the word). Second, subjects of complete ectogenesis—those who develop in AWs entirely—share the same moral status as newborns. To defend the first claim, I rely on Elizabeth Chloe Romanis’s distinctions between fetuses, newborns and (...)
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  • The Race Idea in Reproductive Technologies: Beyond Epistemic Scientism and Technological Mastery.Camisha Russell - 2015 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 12 (4):601-612.
    This paper explores the limitations of epistemic scientism for understanding the role the concept of race plays in assisted reproductive technology practices. Two major limitations centre around the desire to use scientific knowledge to bring about social improvement. In the first case, undue focus is placed on debunking the scientific reality of racial categories and characteristics. The alternative to this approach is to focus instead on the way the race idea functions in ART practices. Doing so reveals how the race (...)
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  • The Normative Relevance of Cases.Marta Spranzi - 2012 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 21 (4):481-492.
    Cases—be they real or fictional—are commonplace both in the medical ethics literature and in the public media. Cases take on a variety of forms: from streamlined to book length narratives. They also serve a variety of different purposes, from illustration, to decision making, and from debunking to heuristics. Drawing on the rhetorical analysis of « exemplum », I shall describe what cases are, and what their role is in the practice of clinical ethics. I identify two basic ways in which (...)
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  • Public Health, Beneficence and Cosmopolitan Justice.L. Horn - 2015 - South African Journal of Bioethics and Law 8 (2):30.
    This article proposes that, in line with moral-cosmopolitan theorists, affluent nations have an obligation, founded in justice and not merely altruism or beneficence, to share the responsibility of the burden of public health implementation in low-income contexts. The current Ebola epidemic highlights the fact that countries with under-developed health systems and limited resources cannot cope with a significant and sudden health threat. The link between burden of disease, adverse factors in the social environment and poverty is well established and confirmed (...)
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  • A Care Ethics Approach to Ethical Advocacy for Community Conditions.Philip G. Day, Kristian E. Sanchack & Robert P. Lennon - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (4):35-37.
    Volume 20, Issue 4, May 2020, Page 35-37.
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  • Developing a Toolkit for Engagement Practice: Sharing Power with Communities in Priority-Setting for Global Health Research Projects.Bridget Pratt - 2020 - BMC Medical Ethics 21 (1).
    BackgroundCommunities’ engagement in priority-setting is a key means for setting research topics and questions of relevance and benefit to them. However, without attention to dynamics of power and diversity, their engagement can be tokenistic. So far, there remains limited ethical guidance on how to share power with communities, particularly those considered disadvantaged and marginalised, in global health research priority-setting. This paper generates a comprehensive, empirically-based “ethical toolkit” to provide such guidance, further strengthening a previously proposed checklist version of the toolkit. (...)
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  • An Ethical Argument in Favor of Nano-Enabled Diagnostics in Livestock Disease Control.Johan Evers, Stefan Aerts & Johan De Tavernier - 2008 - NanoEthics 2 (2):163-178.
    Livestock production has been confronted with several epidemics over the last decades. The morality of common animal disease strategies—stamping out and vaccination—is being debated and provokes controversies among farmers, authorities and the broader public. Given the complexity and controversy of choosing an appropriate control strategy, this article explores the potential of nano-enabled diagnostics in future livestock production. At first glance, these applications offer promising opportunities for better animal disease surveillance. By significantly shortening the reaction time from diagnosis to appropriate control, (...)
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  • Doctors as Fiduciaries: Do Medical Professionals Have the Right Not to Treat?Edwin C. Hui - 2005 - Poiesis and Praxis 3 (4):256-276.
    In the first part of the paper, the author discusses the origin and obligation of the medical profession and argues that the duty of fidelity in the context of a patient–professional relationship (PPR) is the central obligation of medical professionals. The duty of fidelity entails seeking the patient’s best interests even at the expense of the professional’s own, and refusing to treat a risk-patient infected by SARS is a breach of fidelity because the medical professional is involved in a situation (...)
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  • Doctor? Who? Nurses, Patient's Best Interests and Treatment Withdrawal: When No Doctor is Available, Should Nurses Withdraw Treatment From Patients?Giles Birchley - 2013 - Nursing Philosophy 14 (2):96-108.
    Where a decision has been made to stop futile treatment of critically ill patients on an intensive care unit – what is termed withdrawal of treatment in the UK – yet no doctor is available to perform the actions of withdrawal, nurses may be called upon to perform key tasks. In this paper I present two moral justifications for this activity by offering answers to two major questions. One is to ask if it can be in patients' best interests for (...)
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  • Autonomy and couples’ joint decision-making in healthcare.Pauline E. Osamor & Christine Grady - 2018 - BMC Medical Ethics 19 (1):3.
    Respect for autonomy is a key principle in bioethics. However, respecting autonomy in practice is complex because most people define themselves and make decisions influenced by a complex network of social relationships. The extent to which individual autonomy operates for each partner within the context of decision-making within marital or similar relationships is largely unexplored. This paper explores issues related to decision-making by couples for health care and the circumstances under which such a practice should be respected as compatible with (...)
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  • Applying “Place” to Research Ethics and Cultural Competence/Humility Training.Dianne Quigley - 2016 - Journal of Academic Ethics 14 (1):19-33.
    Research ethics principles and regulations typically have been applied to the protection of individual human subjects. Yet, new paradigms of research that include the place-based community and cultural groups as partners or participants of environmental research interventions, in particular, require attention to place-based identities and geographical contexts. This paper argues the importance of respecting “place” within human subjects protections applied to communities and cultural groups as part of a critical need for research ethics and cultural competence training for graduate research (...)
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  • Developing a Scientific Virtue-Based Approach to Science Ethics Training.Robert T. Pennock & Michael O’Rourke - 2017 - Science and Engineering Ethics 23 (1):243-262.
    Responsible conduct of research training typically includes only a subset of the issues that ought to be included in science ethics and sometimes makes ethics appear to be a set of externally imposed rules rather than something intrinsic to scientific practice. A new approach to science ethics training based upon Pennock’s notion of the scientific virtues may help avoid such problems. This paper motivates and describes three implementations—theory-centered, exemplar-centered, and concept-centered—that we have developed in courses and workshops to introduce students (...)
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  • Informed Consent in Implantable BCI Research: Identifying Risks and Exploring Meaning.Eran Klein - 2016 - Science and Engineering Ethics 22 (5):1299-1317.
    Implantable brain–computer interface technology is an expanding area of engineering research now moving into clinical application. Ensuring meaningful informed consent in implantable BCI research is an ethical imperative. The emerging and rapidly evolving nature of implantable BCI research makes identification of risks, a critical component of informed consent, a challenge. In this paper, 6 core risk domains relevant to implantable BCI research are identified—short and long term safety, cognitive and communicative impairment, inappropriate expectations, involuntariness, affective impairment, and privacy and security. (...)
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  • Silence in Violence: A Curse or a Goodwill?Afsheen Amir Ali Hirani, Nasreen Rafiq, Shyrose Sultan, Zainish Hajani & Samreen Siraj - 2019 - Eubios Journal of Asian and International Bioethics 29 (3):109-112.
    Healthcare professionals face dilemmas regarding maintaining and breaching confidentiality while dealing with victims of sexual violence. The sensitivity of the cases of violence and the aim to prevent harm generates ambiguity for sound ethical and legal decision making. In Pakistan, maintaining silence is often preferred over breaking the silence. Thus, it is essential to view the risks and benefits of the conflicting positions keeping in mind the diverse perspectives and the bigger picture. Organizations, community and government can plan different strategies (...)
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  • Living the Anthropocene From ‘the End of Nature’ to Ethical Prospects.Jan Gresil S. Kahambing - 2019 - Eubios Journal of Asian and International Bioethics 29 (4):145-149.
    This article explores the viability of life after ‘the end of nature’ – as Žižek reports – in the Anthropocene. Humans can no longer consistently rely on their persistent interventions to nature as its source. The end of nature, however, does not only mean that the problem is solely ecological. Instead, it points to the original chaos of catastrophes that disturb the link of man’s relationship to nature. In short, the current predicament of the times not only exposes problems of (...)
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  • Gender Identity and Future Thinking About Parenthood: A Qualitative Analysis of Focus Group Data With Transgender and Non-Binary People in the United Kingdom.Fiona Tasker & Jorge Gato - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
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  • Medical Experimentation, Ethics and Regulation: Some Strands of Enquiry.Ankita Chakravarty - 2016 - Eubios Journal of Asian and International Bioethics 26 (3):125-127.
    Ethical concerns surrounding medical research in resource-poor settings. including the 'pharming' out or outsourcing or ‘offshoring’ of clinical trials, and how these relate to the economic, historical and political dimensions of the global scientific field, are a recurrent theme across the different social science disciplines.
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  • Patients Without Borders: Medical Tourism.Ann Boyd, Brianna Higgins & Katelyn Millison - 2020 - Eubios Journal of Asian and International Bioethics 30 (1):2-8.
    Medical tourism is a form of medical travel wherein patients move across borders from their home country to another for the purpose of seeking medical trea tmen t tha t is unavailable or unaffordable at home, for the privacy of a transnational location, or for the tourist destination attractions. Medical tourist may seek procedures not approved at home, such as stem cell treatments, or physician assisted suicide. International travel for procedures legal at home and in the destination c oun t (...)
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