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  1. There Oughta Be a Law: When Does(N’T) the U.S. Common Rule Apply?Michelle N. Meyer - 2020 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 48 (1_suppl):60-73.
    Using mobile health research as an extended example, this article provides an overview of when the Common Rule “applies” to a variety of activities, what might be meant when one says that the Common Rule does or does not “apply,” the extent to which these different meanings of “apply” matter, and, when the Common Rule does apply, how it applies.
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  • Integrating Rules for Genomic Research, Clinical Care, Public Health Screening and DTC Testing: Creating Translational Law for Translational Genomics.Susan M. Wolf, Pilar N. Ossorio, Susan A. Berry, Henry T. Greely, Amy L. McGuire, Michelle A. Penny & Sharon F. Terry - 2020 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 48 (1):69-86.
    Human genomics is a translational field spanning research, clinical care, public health, and direct-to-consumer testing. However, law differs across these domains on issues including liability, consent, promoting quality of analysis and interpretation, and safeguarding privacy. Genomic activities crossing domains can thus encounter confusion and conflicts among these approaches. This paper suggests how to resolve these conflicts while protecting the rights and interests of individuals sequenced. Translational genomics requires this more translational approach to law.
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  • The Ethics of Clinical Care and the Ethics of Clinical Research: Yin and Yang.Charles J. Kowalski, Raymond J. Hutchinson & Adam J. Mrdjenovich - 2017 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 42 (1):7-32.
    The Belmont Report’s distinction between research and the practice of accepted therapy has led various authors to suggest that these purportedly distinct activities should be governed by different ethical principles. We consider some of the ethical consequences of attempts to separate the two and conclude that separation fails along ontological, ethical, and epistemological dimensions. Clinical practice and clinical research, as with yin and yang, can be thought of as complementary forces interacting to form a dynamic system in which the whole (...)
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  • An Epistemic Argument for Research-Practice Integration in Medicine.Robyn Bluhm & Kirstin Borgerson - 2018 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 43 (4):469-484.
    Arguments in favor of greater research-practice integration in medicine have tended to be ethical, political, or pragmatic. There are good epistemic reasons to pursue greater integration, and it is important to think through these reasons in order to avoid inadvertently designing new systems in ways that replicate the epistemic elitism common within current systems. Meaningful transformation within health care is possible with close attention to all reasons in favor of greater research-practice integration, including epistemic reasons.
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  • Rethinking the Belmont Report?Phoebe Friesen, Lisa Kearns, Barbara Redman & Arthur L. Caplan - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics 17 (7):15-21.
    This article reflects on the relevance and applicability of the Belmont Report nearly four decades after its original publication. In an exploration of criticisms that have been raised in response to the report and of significant changes that have occurred within the context of biomedical research, five primary themes arise. These themes include the increasingly vague boundary between research and practice, unique harms to communities that are not addressed by the principle of respect for persons, and how growing complexity and (...)
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  • The Research‐Treatment Distinction: A Problematic Approach for Determining Which Activities Should Have Ethical Oversight.Nancy E. Kass, Ruth R. Faden, Steven N. Goodman, Peter Pronovost, Sean Tunis & Tom L. Beauchamp - 2013 - Hastings Center Report 43 (s1):4-15.
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  • An Ethics Framework for a Learning Health Care System: A Departure From Traditional Research Ethics and Clinical Ethics.Ruth R. Faden, Nancy E. Kass, Steven N. Goodman, Peter Pronovost, Sean Tunis & Tom L. Beauchamp - 2013 - Hastings Center Report 43 (s1):16-27.
  • Vexed Again: Social Scientists and the Revision of the Common Rule, 2011-2018.Zachary M. Schrag - 2019 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 47 (2):254-263.
    In revising the Federal Policy for the Protection of Human Subjects between 2009 and 2018, regulators devoted the vast bulk of their attention to debates over biomedical research. They lacked both expertise in and concern about the social sciences and humanities, yet they imposed their will on experts in those fields. The revision process was secretive, spasmodic, and unrepresentative, especially compared to rulemaking in Canada, where social scientists participate in the process, and revisions take place every few years. The result (...)
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  • Beyond Open Communication: A Call for Partnership Between Clinical Ethics and Research Ethics Committees.Christine Grady, David Gibbes Miller & Hae Lin Cho - 2018 - American Journal of Bioethics 18 (1):52-54.
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