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  1. Ethical Reputation of Financial Institutions: Do Board Characteristics Matter?Laura Baselga-Pascual, Antonio Trujillo-Ponce, Emilia Vähämaa & Sami Vähämaa - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 148 (3):489-510.
    This paper examines the association between board characteristics and the ethical reputation of financial institutions. Given the pivotal governance role of the board of directors and the value-relevance of ethical corporate behavior, we postulate a positive relationship between ethical reputation and board features that foster more effective monitoring and oversight. Using a sample of large financial institutions from 13 different countries, we run several alternative panel regressions of ethical reputation on board characteristics and firm-specific controls. Our results demonstrate that the (...)
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  • CSR as Gendered Neocoloniality in the Global South.Banu Ozkazanc-Pan - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 160 (4):851-864.
    Corporate social responsibility has generally been recognized as corporate pro-social behavior aimed at remediating social issues external to organizations, while political CSR has acknowledged the political nature of such activity beyond social aims. Despite the growth of this literature, there is still little attention given to gender as the starting point for a conversation on CSR, ethics, and the Global South. Deploying critical insights from feminist work in postcolonial traditions, I outline how MNCs replicate gendered neocolonialist discourses and perpetuate exploitative (...)
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  • Does Board Gender Diversity Influence Financial Performance? Evidence From Spain.Nuria Reguera-Alvarado, Pilar de Fuentes & Joaquina Laffarga - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 141 (2):337-350.
    In recent years, several countries have enacted guidelines and/or mandatory laws to increase the presence of women on the boards of companies. Through these regulatory interventions, the aim is to eradicate the social and labor grievances that women have traditionally experienced and which has relegated them to smaller-scale jobs. Nevertheless, and despite the advances achieved, the female representation in the boardroom remains far from the desired levels. In this context, it is now necessary to enhance the advantages of board gender (...)
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  • Measurement Issues in Environmental Corporate Social Responsibility (ECSR): Toward a Transparent, Reliable, and Construct Valid Instrument. [REVIEW]Noushi Rahman & Corinne Post - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 105 (3):307-319.
    One of the major roadblocks in conducting Environmental Corporate Social Responsibility (ECSR) research is operationalization of the construct. Existing ECSR measurement tools either require primary data gathering or special subscriptions to proprietary databases that have limited replicability. We address this deficiency by developing a transparent ECSR measure, with an explicit coding scheme, that strictly relies on publicly available data. Our ECSR measure tests favorably for internal consistency and inter-rater reliability, as well as convergent and discriminant validity.
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  • Gender Diversity on European Banks' Boards of Directors.Ruth Mateos de Cabo, Ricardo Gimeno & María J. Nieto - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 109 (2):145-162.
    This article investigates the gender diversity of the corporate board of European Union banks. Employing a large sample of 612 European banks from 20 European countries, it identifies organizational characteristics that could be predictive of women’s presence on bank boards. We identify three factors that play a particularly important role in defining bank board gender diversity. First, the proportion of women on the board is higher for lower-risk banks. We argue that there may be some statistical discrimination behind this relation, (...)
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  • Boardroom Diversity and its Effect on Social Performance: Conceptualization and Empirical Evidence. [REVIEW]Taïeb Hafsi & Gokhan Turgut - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 112 (3):463-479.
    In this paper, we seek to answer two questions: (1) what does boardroom diversity stand for in the strategic management literature? And, (2) is there a significant relationship between boardroom diversity and corporate social performance. We first clarify the boardroom diversity concept, distinguishing between a structural diversity of boards and a demographic diversity in boards, and then we investigate its possible linkage to social performance in a sample of S&P500 firms. We find a significant relationship between diversity in boards and (...)
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  • Hidden Connections: The Link Between Board Gender Diversity and Corporate Social Performance. [REVIEW]Ioanna Boulouta - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 113 (2):185-197.
    This study examines whether and how female board directors may affect corporate social performance (CSP) by drawing on social role theory and feminist ethics literature. The empirical analysis, based on a sample of 126 firms drawn from the S&P500 group of companies over a 5-year period, suggests that board gender diversity (BGD) significantly affects CSP. However, this impact depends on the social performance metric under investigation. In particular, more gender diverse boards exert stronger influence on CSP metrics focusing on ‘negative’ (...)
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  • Board Composition and Corporate Social Responsibility: An Empirical Investigation in the Post Sarbanes-Oxley Era. [REVIEW]Jason Q. Zhang, Hong Zhu & Hung-bin Ding - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 114 (3):381-392.
    Although the composition of the board of directors has important implications for different aspects of firm performance, prior studies tend to focus on financial performance. The effects of board composition on corporate social responsibility (CSR) performance remain an under-researched area, particularly in the period following the enactment of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (SOX). This article specifically examines two important aspects of board composition (i.e., the presence of outside directors and the presence of women directors) and their relationship with CSR (...)
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  • The Impact of Operational Diversity on Corporate Philanthropy: An Empirical Study of U.S. Companies. [REVIEW]Jean D. Kabongo, Kiyoung Chang & Ying Li - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 116 (1):49-65.
    This paper investigates the impact of diversity on corporate philanthropy. Compared to previous studies that have considered the influence of board diversity and CEO gender on corporate philanthropy, this study introduces the concept of operational diversity, which is the implementation of diversity programs at management, employee, and supply chain levels, and further, it explains why operational diversity influences corporate philanthropy, by using the premises of resource dependence theory. Second, this study also investigates the influence of board diversity on corporate philanthropy. (...)
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  • The Gender Quota and Female Leadership: Effects of the Norwegian Gender Quota on Board Chairs and CEOs. [REVIEW]Mingzhu Wang & Elisabeth Kelan - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 117 (3):449-466.
    In this article, we use a sample of Norwegian quoted companies in the period of 2001–2010 to explore whether the gender quota requiring 40 % female directors on corporate boards changes the likelihood of women being appointed to top leadership roles as board chairs or corporate CEOs. Our empirical results indicate that the gender quota and the resulting increased representation of female directors provide a fertile ground for women to take top leadership positions. The presence of female board chairs is (...)
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  • Gender Diversity in the Boardroom and Firm Performance: What Exactly Constitutes a “Critical Mass?”.Jasmin Joecks, Kerstin Pull & Karin Vetter - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 118 (1):61-72.
    The under-representation of women on boards is a heavily discussed topic—not only in Germany. Based on critical mass theory and with the help of a hand-collected panel dataset of 151 listed German firms for the years 2000–2005, we explore whether the link between gender diversity and firm performance follows a U-shape. Controlling for reversed causality, we find evidence for gender diversity to at first negatively affect firm performance and—only after a “critical mass” of about 30 % women has been reached—to (...)
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  • How Do Board Size and Occupational Background of Directors Influence Social Performance in For-Profit and Non-Profit Organizations? Evidence From California Hospitals.Ge Bai - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 118 (1):171-187.
    This study investigates how board size and occupational background of directors differentially influence social performance in for-profit and non-profit organizations. Using data from California hospitals, we develop a quantitative measure of social performance and provide the following empirical evidence. First, board size is negatively (positively) associated with social performance in for-profit (non-profit) hospitals. Second, the presence of government officials on the board is negatively (positively) related to social performance in for-profit (non-profit) hospitals. Third, representation of physicians on the board is (...)
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  • Are Demographic Attributes and Firm Characteristics Drivers of Gender Diversity? Investigating Women’s Positions on French Boards of Directors.Mehdi Nekhili & Hayette Gatfaoui - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 118 (2):227-249.
    In this article, we examine the factors determining the representation of women on boards of directors by considering three main questions. The first question deals with the relationship between characteristics of ownership and governance on one side, and female directorship on the other. The second major question concerns the demographic attributes of women directors, such as nationality, foreign experience, educational level, business expertise, and connections to external sources. The third important question refers to women in senior positions on French boards (...)
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  • Critical Mass of Women on BODs, Multiple Identities, and Corporate Philanthropic Disaster Response: Evidence From Privately Owned Chinese Firms.Ming Jia & Zhe Zhang - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 118 (2):303-317.
    Although previous studies focus on the role of women in the boardroom and corporate response to natural disasters, none evaluate how women directors influence corporate philanthropic disaster response (CPDR). This study collects data on the philanthropic responses of privately owned Chinese firms to the Wenchuan earthquake of May 12, 2008, and the Yushu earthquake of April 14, 2010. We find that when at least three women serve on a board of directors (BOD), their companies’ responses to natural disasters are more (...)
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  • Corporate Environmental Responsibility in Polluting Industries: Does Religion Matter?Xingqiang Du, Wei Jian, Quan Zeng & Yingjie Du - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 124 (3):1-23.
    Using a sample of Chinese listed firms in polluting industries for the period of 2008–2010, we empirically investigate whether and how Buddhism, China’s most influential religion, affects corporate environmental responsibility (CER). In this study, we measure Buddhist variables as the number of Buddhist monasteries within a certain radius around Chinese listed firms’ registered addresses. In addition, we hand-collect corporate environmental disclosure scores based on the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) sustainability reporting guidelines. Using hand-collected Buddhism data and corporate environmental disclosure scores, (...)
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  • Board Age and Gender Diversity: A Test of Competing Linear and Curvilinear Predictions. [REVIEW]Muhammad Ali, Yin Lu Ng & Carol T. Kulik - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 125 (3):1-16.
    The inconsistent findings of past board diversity research demand a test of competing linear and curvilinear diversity–performance predictions. This research focuses on board age and gender diversity, and presents a positive linear prediction based on resource dependence theory, a negative linear prediction based on social identity theory, and an inverted U-shaped curvilinear prediction based on the integration of resource dependence theory with social identity theory. The predictions were tested using archival data on 288 large organizations listed on the Australian Securities (...)
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  • Corporate Governance and Corporate Social Responsibility Disclosure: Evidence From the US Banking Sector. [REVIEW]Mohammad Issam Jizi, Aly Salama, Robert Dixon & Rebecca Stratling - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 125 (4):1-15.
    There is a distinct lack of research into the relationship between corporate governance and corporate social responsibility (CSR) in the banking sector. This paper fills the gap in the literature by examining the impact of corporate governance, with particular reference to the role of board of directors, on the quality of CSR disclosure in US listed banks’ annual reports after the US sub-prime mortgage crisis. Using a sample of large US commercial banks for the period 2009–2011 and controlling for audit (...)
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  • Why Does Board Gender Diversity Matter and How Do We Get There? The Role of Shareholder Activism in Deinstitutionalizing Old Boys’ Networks.Elise Perrault - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 128 (1):149-165.
    This essay bridges together social network and institutional perspectives to examine how women on boards, by breaking up directors’ homophilous networks, contribute to board effectiveness. It proposes that through real and symbolic representations, women enhance perceptions of the board’s instrumental, relational, and moral legitimacy, leading to increased perceptions of the board’s trustworthiness which in turn fosters shareholders’ trust in the firm. Envisioning the gender diversification of boards as an event of institutional change, this article considers the critical role of shareholder (...)
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  • Women on the Board and Managers’ Pay: Evidence From Spain.Gregorio Sánchez-Marín, Juan Francisco Martín-Ugedo, Juan Samuel Baixauli-Soler, Antonio Mínguez-Vera & Maria Encarnación Lucas-Pérez - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 129 (2):265-280.
    The current literature shows great interest in the issue of gender diversity on boards of directors. Some studies have hypothesized a direct relationship between diversity and the value of the firm, but not many examine the intermediate mechanisms that may exert an influence on such relationships. We employ two stages of GMM estimation methodology to exhibit evidences of the relationship between gender diversity and compensation of top managers in the Spanish context. Results show that gender diversity positively affects the effectiveness (...)
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  • Board Openness During an Economic Crisis.Kangtao Ye, Jigao Zhu & Sunny Li Sun - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 129 (2):363-377.
    Does a board with greater gender diversity make better investment decisions? Drawing on Austrian economic cycle theory and work groups theory, we argue that such board openness will help male board members to overcome gender biases, discrimination, and conflicts; integrate different perspectives under the economic cycle and crisis; and foster an environment in which better decisions are made. The results of an empirical study of 14,609 firm-quarter observations from 1,555 listed firms in China between 2007 and 2009 strongly support our (...)
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  • The Influence of Presence and Position of Women on the Boards of Directors: The Case of NHS Foundation Trusts.Javier Garcia-Lacalle & Sheila Ellwood - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 130 (1):69-84.
    This study examines the influence of women on the boards of directors of National Health Service Foundation Trusts in England. FTs provide a public service where social performance is the primary objective, although financial constraints must be met. Female presence is higher for executive directors than non-executives, reflecting the high number of women employed in the sector. We find that a high female presence among executive and non-executive directorships does not result in significant differences either in financial return or service (...)
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  • From Board Composition to Corporate Environmental Performance Through Sustainability-Themed Alliances.Corinne Post, Noushi Rahman & Cathleen McQuillen - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 130 (2):423-435.
    A growing body of work suggests that the presence of women and of independent directors on boards of directors is associated with higher corporate environmental performance. However, the mechanisms linking board composition to corporate environmental performance are not well understood. This study proposes and empirically tests the mediating role of sustainability-themed alliances in the relationship between board composition and corporate environmental performance. Using the population of public oil and gas firms in the United States as the sample, the study relies (...)
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  • Corporate Reputation Measurement: Alternative Factor Structures, Nomological Validity, and Organizational Outcomes.James Agarwal, Oleksiy Osiyevskyy & Percy M. Feldman - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 130 (2):485-506.
    Management scholars have paid close attention to the construct of organizational or corporate reputation, particularly in the applied business ethics and corporate social responsibility fields. Extant research demonstrates that CR is one of the key mediators between CSR and important organizational outcomes, which ultimately improve organizational performance. Yet, hitherto the research focused on CR construct has been plagued by multiple definitions, conflicting conceptualizations, and unclear operationalizations. The purpose of this article is to provide theoretical ground for positioning of CR as (...)
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  • The Effects of Women on Corporate Boards on Firm Value, Financial Performance, and Ethical and Social Compliance.Helena Isidro & Márcia Sobral - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 132 (1):1-19.
    The European Commission has recently proposed the introduction of legally binding quotas for women on corporate boards of European companies. This proposal has put the spotlight on the question of whether increasing female representation on the board brings economic benefits to the firm. In order to shed light on the issue, this study investigates the direct and indirect effects of women on the board on firm value. We use a simultaneous equation model to estimate the effects of women on the (...)
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  • Board Diversity and Corporate Social Responsibility.Maretno Harjoto, Indrarini Laksmana & Robert Lee - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 132 (4):641-660.
    This study examines the impact of board diversity on firms’ corporate social responsibility performance. Using seven different measures of board diversity across 1,489 U.S. firms from 1999 to 2011, the study finds that board diversity is positively associated with CSR performance. Board diversity is associated with a greater number of areas in which CSR is strong and a fewer number of areas in which CSR is a concern. These findings support the stakeholder theory and are consistent with the view that (...)
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  • Deconstructing the Relationship Between Corporate Social and Financial Performance.Francesco Perrini, Angeloantonio Russo, Antonio Tencati & Clodia Vurro - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 102 (S1):59-76.
    For four decades, research on the role and responsibilities of business in society has centered on the business case for corporate social responsibility (CSR) and an increasing number of studies on the corporate social performance (CSP)—corporate financial performance (CFP) link emerged leading to controversial results. Heeding the call for a deeper understanding of the mechanisms linking certain CSR efforts to certain performance outcomes, this study provides a stakeholder-based organizing framework rooted in an extensive review of existing literature on the link (...)
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  • Women Directors on Corporate Boards: From Tokenism to Critical Mass. [REVIEW]Mariateresa Torchia, Andrea Calabrò & Morten Huse - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 102 (2):299-317.
    Academic debate on the strategic importance of women corporate directors is widely recognized and still open. However, most corporate boards have only one woman director or a small minority of women directors. Therefore they can still be considered as tokens. This article addresses the following question: does an increased number of women corporate boards result in a build up of critical mass that substantially contributes to firm innovation? The aim is to test if ‘at least three women’ could constitute the (...)
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  • Mitigating Stakeholder Marginalisation with the Relational Self.Krista Bondy & Aurelie Charles - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics.
    Stakeholder theory has been an incredibly powerful tool for understanding and improving organisations, and their relationship with other actors in society. That these critical ideas are now accepted within mainstream business is due in no small part to the influence of stakeholder theory. However, improvements to stakeholder engagement through stakeholder theory have tended to help stakeholders who are already somewhat powerful within organisational settings, while those who are less powerful continue to be marginalised and routinely ignored. In this paper, we (...)
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  • Guest Editors’ Introduction: Gender, Business Ethics, and Corporate Social Responsibility: Assessing and Refocusing a Conversation.Kate Grosser, Jeremy Moon & Julie A. Nelson - 2017 - Business Ethics Quarterly 27 (4):541-567.
    ABSTRACT:This article reviews a conversation between business ethicists and feminist scholars begun in the early 1990s and traces the development of that conversation in relation to feminist theory. A bibliographic analysis of the business ethics and corporate social responsibility literatures over a twenty-five-year period elucidates the degree to which gender has been a salient concern, the methodologies adopted, and the ways in which gender has been analyzed. Identifying significant limitations to the incorporation of feminist theory in these literatures, we discuss (...)
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  • The Role of Female Directors in Promoting CSR Practices: An International Comparison Between Family and Non‐Family Businesses.Lázaro Rodríguez-Ariza, Beatriz Cuadrado-Ballesteros, Jennifer Martínez-Ferrero & Isabel-María García-Sánchez - 2017 - Business Ethics: A European Review 26 (2):162-174.
    This article analyzes a panel of 550 international firms, for the period 2004 to 2010, to compare the role of female directors in family and non-family firms in promoting responsible practices. Many studies have associated the presence of women on the board with a higher degree of socially responsible commitment. However, we found that this is much less so in family firms than in non-family firms. In family firms, corporate social responsibility commitment does not vary significantly with the presence of (...)
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  • Does Having Women Managers Lead to Increased Gender Equality Practices in Corporate Social Responsibility?Izaskun Larrieta-Rubín de Celis, Eva Velasco-Balmaseda, Sara Fernández de Bobadilla, María del Mar Alonso-Almeida & Gurutze Intxaurburu-Clemente - 2015 - Business Ethics: A European Review 24 (1):91-110.
    There is increasing interest in determining what impact having women in management positions may have on corporate social responsibility initiatives. Various authors suggest that gender equality practices should be factored into the broader framework of CSR. This paper examines how the presence of women on corporate boards, in top and middle management and as heads of CSR departments, influences gender equality practices in the field of CSR. Using information collected from companies that have signed up to Women's Empowerment Principles in (...)
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  • The Glass Pyramid: Informal Gender Status Hierarchy on Boards.Lívia Markóczy, Sunny Li Sun & Jigao Zhu - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-19.
    Drawing on the status characteristic theory, we investigate the effect of gender on board directors’ status ranking and find that all else being equal, female directors’ status ranking is 81.48% of one position lower than that of male directors, a discrepancy that is attributable to gender. We theorize on the mechanism that determines the ways in which the status value of gender on a board affects board interactions, and we predict how this mechanism influences firm outcomes, including excessive managerial spending, (...)
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  • Board Diversity and Corporate Social Disclosure: Evidence From Vietnam.Trang Cam Hoang, Indra Abeysekera & Shiguang Ma - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 151 (3):833-852.
    Debates around sound corporate governance propose board diversity as a key attribute to sufficiently challenge executive management for stakeholder engagement. This study contributes to this debate by empirically investigating the effect of board diversity on corporate social disclosure of Vietnamese listed firms. The study finds a significantly positive effect of diversity-in-boards on CSD while diversity-of-boards has no effect on CSD. The results contribute by showing that a single theoretical approach can provide an adequate explanation for board diversity. The study contributes (...)
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  • Value-Enhancing Capabilities of CSR: A Brief Review of Contemporary Literature.Mahfuja Malik - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 127 (2):419-438.
    This study reviews and synthesizes the contemporary business literature that focuses on the role of corporate social responsibility to enhance firm value. The main objective of this review is to proffer a precise understanding of what has already been investigated and the findings of those investigations regarding the value-enhancing capabilities of CSR for public firms. In addition, this review identifies gaps in the existing literature, evaluates inconsistent findings, discusses possible data sources for empirical researchers, and provides direction for exploring other (...)
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  • Board Gender Diversity and Corporate Response to Sustainability Initiatives: Evidence From the Carbon Disclosure Project.Walid Ben-Amar, Millicent Chang & Philip McIlkenny - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 142 (2):369-383.
    This paper investigates the effect of female representation on the board of directors on corporate response to stakeholders’ demands for increased public reporting about climate change-related risks. We rely on the Carbon Disclosure Project as a sustainability initiative supported by institutional investors. Greenhouse gas emissions measurement and its disclosure to investors can be thought of as a first step toward addressing climate change issues and reducing the firm’s carbon footprint. Based on a sample of publicly listed Canadian firms over the (...)
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  • The Impact of CSR on Corporate Reputation Perceptions of the Public—A Configurational Multi‐Time, Multi‐Source Perspective.Lisa Maria Rothenhoefer - 2019 - Business Ethics: A European Review 28 (2):141-155.
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  • Comprehensive Board Diversity and Quality of Corporate Social Responsibility Disclosure: Evidence From an Emerging Market.Nooraisah Katmon, Zam Zuriyati Mohamad, Norlia Mat Norwani & Omar Al Farooque - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 157 (2):447-481.
    This study empirically examines the relationship between wide-ranging board diversity and the quality of corporate social responsibility disclosure variables in Malaysia. We extend prior literature covering broader dimensions of board diversity and their impact on CSR after controlling for board and audit committee characteristics. Using 200 listed firms in Bursa Malaysia during 2009–2013 and applying both OLS and 2SLS instrumental variables approaches, we document significant positive effect of board education level and board tenure diversity on the quality of CSR disclosure. (...)
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  • Does an Asset Owner’s Institutional Setting Influence Its Decision to Sign the Principles for Responsible Investment?Andreas G. F. Hoepner, Arleta A. A. Majoch & Xiao Y. Zhou - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-26.
    From a simple idea to unite asset owners in their quest for responsible investment at its launch in April 2006, the United Nations supported Principles for Responsible Investment have grown in just one decade into an initiative with more than 1500 fee-paying signatories. Jointly, the PRI’s signatories hold assets worth more than $80 trillion, making it one of the more prevalent not-for-profit organizations worldwide. Furthermore, the PRI’s ambitious mission to transform the financial system at large into a more sustainable one (...)
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  • Female Executives and Perceived Employer Attractiveness: On the Potentially Adverse Signal of Having a Female CHRO Rather Than a Female CFO.Anja Iseke & Kerstin Pull - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 156 (4):1113-1133.
    We investigate whether female executives influence perceived employer attractiveness for female job seekers. Drawing on signaling theory, we argue that female members in top management may signal organizational justice and organizational support and may therefore enhance perceived employer attractiveness. Findings from a scenario experiment with 357 participants indicate that female job seekers are more attracted to an organization with a female executive holding a non-stereotypical office [such as Chief Financial Officer ] as compared to an organization with an all-male top (...)
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  • Empowering Women: The Role of Emancipative Forces in Board Gender Diversity.Steven A. Brieger, Claude Francoeur, Christian Welzel & Walid Ben-Amar - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 155 (2):495-511.
    This study investigates the effect of country-level emancipative forces on corporate gender diversity around the world. Based on Welzel’s theory of emancipation, we develop an emancipatory framework of board gender diversity that explains how action resources, emancipative values and civic entitlements enable, motivate and encourage women to take leadership roles on corporate boards. Using a sample of 6390 firms operating in 30 countries around the world, our results show positive single and combined effects of the framework components on board gender (...)
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  • CSR and Feminist Organization Studies: Towards an Integrated Theorization for the Analysis of Gender Issues.Kate Grosser & Jeremy Moon - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 155 (2):321-342.
    Although corporate social responsibility practice increasingly addresses gender issues, and gender and CSR scholarship is expanding, feminist theory is rarely explicitly referenced or discussed in the CSR literature. We contend that this omission is a key limitation of the field. We argue that CSR theorization and research on gender can be improved through more explicit and systematic reference to feminist theories, and particularly those from feminist organization studies. Addressing this gap, we review developments in feminist organization theory, mapping their relevance (...)
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  • To What Extent Do Gender Diverse Boards Enhance Corporate Social Performance?Claude Francoeur, Réal Labelle, Souha Balti & Saloua E. L. Bouzaidi - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 155 (2):343-357.
    The inconclusiveness of previous research on the association between gender diverse boards and corporate social performance has led us to revisit the question in light of stakeholder management and institutional theories. Given that corporate social responsibility is a multidimensional concept, we test the influence of GDB on various groups of stakeholders. By considering the interaction between stakeholders’ power and directors’ personal motivations toward the prioritization of stakeholders’ claims, we find that GDB are positively related to CSR dimensions that are related (...)
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  • The Influence of Corporate Elites on Women on Supervisory Boards: Female Directors’ Inclusion in Germany.Jie Huang, Marjo-Riitta Diehl & Sandra Paterlini - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-18.
    Although we can observe noticeable progress in gender diversity on corporate boards, these boards remain far from gender balanced. Our paper builds on social identity theory to examine the impact of corporate elites—men and women who sit on multiple corporate boards—on board diversity. We extend the main argument of social identity theory concerning favouritism based on homophily by suggesting that boards with men with multiple appointments are unwilling to include female board members to protect the monopoly value generated by their (...)
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  • Corporate Board and Corporate Social Responsibility Assurance: Evidence From China.Lin Liao, Teng Lin & Yuyu Zhang - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 150 (1):211-225.
    This paper investigates the association between board characteristics and the company’s corporate social responsibility assurance decision in China. By examining 2054 firm-years of Chinese listed companies with CSR reports from 2008 to 2012, we find that firms with a large board size, more female directors, and separation of CEO and chairman positions are more likely to engage in CSR assurance. Gender diversity also influences the CSR assurance provider choice. However, board independence and overseas background of the CEO do not affect (...)
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  • Corporate Social Responsibility: Review and Roadmap of Theoretical Perspectives.Jędrzej George Frynas & Camila Yamahaki - 2016 - Business Ethics: A European Review 25 (3):258-285.
    Based on a survey and content analysis of 462 peer-reviewed academic articles over the period 1990–2014, this article reviews theories related to the external drivers of corporate social responsibility and the internal drivers of CSR that have been utilized to explain CSR. The article discusses the main tenets of the principal theoretical perspectives and their application in CSR research. Going beyond previous reviews that have largely failed to investigate theory applications in CSR scholarship, this article stresses the importance of theory-driven (...)
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  • Constructing Gender Identity Through Masculinity in CSR Reports: The South Korean Case.Jinyoung Lee & Jane L. Parpart - 2018 - Business Ethics: A European Review 27 (4):309-323.
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  • Gender Diversity on Boards of Directors and Remuneration Committees: The Influence on Listed Companies in Spain.Antonio L. García-Izquierdo, Carlos Fernández-Méndez & Rubén Arrondo-García - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  • Does Confucianism Reduce Board Gender Diversity? Firm-Level Evidence From China.Xingqiang Du - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 136 (2):399-436.
    This study extends previous literature on the association between Confucianism and corporate decisions by examining Confucianism’s influence on board gender diversity. Using a sample of Chinese listed firms during the period of 2001–2011 and geographic-proximity-based Confucianism variables, I provide strong and consistent evidence to show that Confucianism is significantly negatively associated with board gender diversity, suggesting that the proportion of women directors in the boardroom is significantly lower for firms surrounded by strong Confucianism atmosphere than for firms located in regions (...)
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  • The Association Between Gender-Diverse Compensation Committees and CEO Compensation.Martin Bugeja, Zoltan Matolcsy & Helen Spiropoulos - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 139 (2):375-390.
    We examine the association between gender-diverse compensation committees and CEO pay and find that CEO compensation levels are negatively associated with gender-diversity of the compensation committee, but not gender-diversity of the board. Furthermore, we find that excess CEO compensation is negatively related to subsequent return on assets for firms with an all-male compensation committee but not for firms with a gender-diverse compensation committee. These results suggest that CEOs do receive some level of excess compensation which can be mitigated by having (...)
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  • Financial Management Effectiveness and Board Gender Diversity in Member-Governed, Community Financial Institutions.Anne Marie Ward & John Forker - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 141 (2):351-366.
    Although non-profit organisations typically have high representation of females on their boards, relatively little is known about the effects of gender diversity in these organisations particularly in relation to financial management. In this archival study, resource dependency theory and agency analysis are combined to provide theoretical insight and empirical analysis of gender diversity on effective financial management in member-governed, community financial institutions. The investigation is possible due to the unique characteristics of the organisational form and region being examined—credit unions in (...)
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