Switch to: References

Citations of:

An Invitation to Environmental Sociology

Pine Forge Press (2011)

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Controlling the Wilderness: The Work of Wilderness Officers.Helene Lawson - 2003 - Society and Animals 11 (4):329-351.
    Ideologies having roots in the legal structure of the system of wildlife protection characterize the work culture of the Pennsylvania wilderness officer. This paper examines these ideologies and the characteristically strong social solidarity of the community of wilderness officers. Wilderness officers are both law enforcement agents and conservationists. They mediate between human and animal as well as between what is considered scientific management and what is considered unenlightened and even lawless behavior. In performing this boundary work, wilderness officers participate in (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • A Statewide Examination of Hunting and Trophy Nonhuman Animals: Perspectives of Montana Hunters.Stephen Eliason - 2008 - Society and Animals 16 (3):256-278.
    The purpose of this descriptive and exploratory study was to extend our understanding of the motivations for trophy hunting. Hunting is an important recreational activity and part of the culture in Montana. Placing specific emphasis on the importance of obtaining a trophy nonhuman animal when hunting, the study examined the attitudes of resident hunters and nonresident outfitter-sponsored hunters. The study used a qualitative approach to data collection and developed 2 surveys that contained mostly open-ended questions. Results from 1000 surveys mailed (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Pigs and People: Sociological Perspectives on the Discipline of Nonhuman Animals in Intensive Confinement.Joel Novek - 2005 - Society and Animals 13 (3):221-244.
    Highly concentrated intensive confinement systems have become the norm in agriculture concerning nonhuman animals. These systems have provoked a lively debate from an animal welfare perspective. Sociologists can contribute to this debate by drawing parallels between the institutional regulation of human beings and of animals under confinement. Results of research on the transformation of Canadian hog production from the 1950s to the present—based on the evolution of plans for sow housing produced by the Canada Plan Service—showed a much tighter compression (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Achieving Concrete Utopia Through Knowledge, Ethics and Transformative Learning.Trond Gansmo Jakobsen - 2018 - Journal of Critical Realism 17 (3):282-296.
    ABSTRACTRoy Bhaskar's concrete utopianism assumes that a key role for intellectuals, given the current precarious situation of humanity, is the envisaging of alternative possible futures, coherently grounded in the deep structure of what already exists, which includes what people already know and have. Without this grounding, people will not be able to make a persuasive case for change. With this grounding, and by combining the realism of the intellect with the optimism of the will, they may be able to usher (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • The Intrinsic Value of Nature and Moral Education.William S. Helton & Nicole D. Helton - 2007 - Journal of Moral Education 36 (2):139-150.
    Many environmental, humane and character educators try to foster a belief in the intrinsic value of nature and a respect for non-human life among students. Marangudakis argues that Christianity advocates anthropocentrism and opposes belief in the intrinsic value of nature. If Marangudakis is correct, then a goal of many environmental and humane educators may conflict with some of their students' religious beliefs and training. Fears of conflicting students' religious beliefs may deter environmental and humane educators from teaching students to respect (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • 2009 AFHVS Presidential Address: The Steering Question: Challenges to Achieving Food System Sustainability. [REVIEW]Gilbert W. Gillespie - 2010 - Agriculture and Human Values 27 (1):3-12.
    In this address I examine the challenges of achieving food system sustainability. Starting from the position that most people want a food system that is “sustainable” and that we have a great reservoir of unapplied technical knowledge applicable to increasing sustainability, I argue that the big issue is collective decision-making to accomplish the goal of sustainability. Using the metaphor of a sailing ship, I raise three questions about steering collectively toward sustainability: What do we want? What are our options? And, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • The Stakeholder Approach: A Sustainability Perspective.Don Clifton & Azlan Amran - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 98 (1):121-136.
    This article considers the stakeholder approach (SHA) to organisational management through the lens of what it means for humans to live sustainably on the Earth (that is, for there to be a sustainable world). In particular, the article considers if the SHA, as it is presented in mainstream academic and management literature, is supportive of corporate practices that advance the achievement of a sustainable world. The analysis shows the SHA to have significant failings in this regard when viewed against key (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations