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A theory of imitation in Plato's `Republic'

In Andrew Laird (ed.), Ancient Literary Criticism. Oxford University Press (2006)

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  1. Plato on Poetic and Musical Representation.Justin Vlasits - 2021 - In Platonic Mimesis Revisited. Baden-Baden, Germany: pp. 147-165.
    Plato’s most infamous discussions of poetry in the Republic, in which he both develops original distinctions in narratology and advocates some form of censorship, raises numerous philosophical and philological questions. Foremost among them, perhaps, is the puzzle of why he returns to poetry in Book X after having dealt with it thoroughly in Books II–III, particularly because his accounts of the “mimetic” aspect of poetry are, on their face, quite different. How are we to understand this double treatment? Here I (...)
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  • The Form of Bed in Plato’s Republic.Luca Pitteloud - 2015 - Archai: Revista de Estudos Sobre as Origens Do Pensamento Ocidental 14:51-58.
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  • The Role of the Poet in Plato's Ideal Cities of Callipolis and Magnesia.Gerard Naddaf - 2007 - Kriterion: Journal of Philosophy 28 (116):329-349.
  • Apariencia E Imagen: Examen a Partir de Algunos Diálogos Platónicos.Delgado Carolina - 2016 - Estudios de Filosofía (Universidad de Antioquia) 53.
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  • The Role of the Poet in Plato's Ideal Cities of Callipolis and Magnesia.Gerard Naddaf - 2008 - Kriterion: Journal of Philosophy 4.
    Plato's attitude toward the poets and poetry has always been a flashpoint of debate, controversy and notoriety, but most scholars have failed to see their central role in the ideal cities of the Republic and the Laws, that is, Callipolis and Magnesia. In this paper, I argue that in neither dialogue does Plato "exile" the poets, but, instead, believes they must, like all citizens, exercise the expertise proper to their profession, allowing them the right to become full-fledged participants in the (...)
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  • Plato on Poetry: Imitation or Inspiration?Nickolas Pappas - 2012 - Philosophy Compass 7 (10):669-678.
    A passage in Plato’s Laws offers a fresh look at Plato’s theory of poetry and art. Only here does Plato call poetry both mimêsis “imitation, representation,” and the product of enthousiasmos “inspiration, possession.” The Republic and Sophist examine poetic imitation; the Ion and Phaedrus develop a theory of artistic inspiration; but Plato does not confront the two descriptions together outside this paragraph. After all, mimêsis fuels an attack on poetry, while enthousiasmos is sometimes used to attack it, sometimes to praise (...)
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