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Confucian Political Ethics

Princeton University Press (2007)

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  1. The Concept of Yi (义) in the Mencius and Problems of Distributive Justice.Sor-Hoon Tan - 2014 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 92 (3):489-505.
    This paper examines attempts to find a conception of justice in early Confucian contexts, focusing on the concept of yi (translated as ?appropriateness?, ?right?, ?rightness?, even ?justice?) in the Mencius. It argues against the approach of deriving principles of dividing burdens and benefits from the discussions of concrete cases employing the concept of yi and instead shows that Confucian ethical concerns are more attentive to what kinds of interpersonal relations are appropriate in specific circumstances. It questions the exclusive emphasis in (...)
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  • The Art of War Corpus and Chinese Just War Ethics Past and Present.Ping-Cheung Lo - 2012 - Journal of Religious Ethics 40 (3):404-446.
    The idea of “just war” is not alien to Chinese thought. The term “yi zhan” (usually translated as “just war” or “righteous war” in English) is used in Mencius, was renewed by Mao Zedong, and is still being used in China today (zhengyi zhanzheng). The best place to start exploring this Chinese idea is in the enormous Art of War corpus in premodern China, of which the Seven Military Classics is the best representative. This set of treatises served as the (...)
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  • Relational Care Ethics From a Comparative Perspective: The Ethics of Care and Confucian Ethics.Yoshimi Wada - 2014 - Ethics and Social Welfare 8 (4):350-363.
  • The Confucian Self and Experiential Spirituality.Xinzhong Yao - 2008 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 7 (4):393-406.
    Since the publication of his book on Zhongyong, Tu Weiming has worked for more than 30 years on an anthropocosmic reconstruction of the Confucian universe, in which self-transformation is defined both as the starting point and as the necessary vehicle for one’s spiritual journey. This article is primarily intended to examine Tu’s attempts to reconstruct Confucian spirituality but further to take a step forward to argue that in the spiritual world as construed by Confucius and Mencius, the experiential functions as (...)
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