Citations of work:

Richard Bellon (2001). Joseph Dalton Hooker's Ideals for a Professional Man of Science.

7 found
Order:
Are we missing citations?

PhilPapers citations & references are currently in beta testing. We expect to add many more in the future.

Meanwhile, you can use our bibliography tool to import references for this or another work.

Or you can directly add citations for the above work:

Search for work by author name and title
Add directly by record ID

  1.  44
    A Life More Ordinary: The Dull Life but Interesting Times of Joseph Dalton Hooker. [REVIEW]Jim Endersby - 2011 - Journal of the History of Biology 44 (4):611 - 631.
    The life of Joseph Dalton Hooker (1817-1911) provides an invaluable lens through which to view mid-Victorian science. A biographical approach makes it clear that some well-established narratives about this period need revising. For example, Hooker's career cannot be considered an example of the professionalisation of the sciences, given the doubtful respectability of being paid to do science and his reliance on unpaid collectors with pretensions to equal scientific and/or social status. Nor was Hooker's response to Darwin's theories either straightforward or (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  18
    Between the Beagle and the Barnacle: Darwin’s Microscopy, 1837–1854.Boris Jardine - 2009 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 40 (4):382-395.
    The discovery of a small collection of Darwin manuscripts at the Whipple Museum of the History of Science has allowed a reconsideration of Darwin’s interest in and knowledge of microscopy. Concentrating on the years between his return from the Beagle voyage and the publication of the major taxonomic work on barnacles, this paper recovers a number of important aspects of Darwin’s intellectual and practical development: on returning from the Beagle voyage he acquainted himself with the work of C. G. Ehrenberg, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  15
    Joseph Hooker Takes a "Fixed Post": Transmutation and the "Present Unsatisfactory State of Systematic Botany", 1844-1860. [REVIEW]Richard Bellon - 2006 - Journal of the History of Biology 39 (1):1 - 39.
    Joseph Hooker first learned that Charles Darwin believed in the transmutation of species in 1844. For the next 14 years, Hooker remained a "nonconsenter" to Darwin's views, resolving to keep the question of species origin "subservient to Botany instead of Botany to it, as must be the true relation." Hooker placed particular emphasis on the need for any theory of species origin to support the broad taxonomic delimitation of species, a highly contentious issue. His always provisional support for special creation (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  4.  11
    Joseph Hooker Takes a “Fixed Post”: Transmutation and the “Present Unsatisfactory State of Systematic Botany”, 1844–1860.Richard Bellon - 2006 - Journal of the History of Biology 39 (1):1-39.
    Joseph Hooker first learned that Charles Darwin believed in the transmutation of species in 1844. For the next 14 years, Hooker remained a "nonconsenter" to Darwin's views, resolving to keep the question of species origin "subservient to Botany instead of Botany to it, as must be the true relation." Hooker placed particular emphasis on the need for any theory of species origin to support the broad taxonomic delimitation of species, a highly contentious issue. His always provisional support for special creation (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  5.  2
    A Question of Merit: John Hutton Balfour, Joseph Hooker and the ‘Concussion’ Over the Edinburgh Chair of Botany.Richard Bellon - 2005 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 36 (1):25-54.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  6.  18
    A Question of Merit: John Hutton Balfour, Joseph Hooker and the 'Concussion' Over the Edinburgh Chair of Botany.Richard Bellon - 2005 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 36 (1):25-54.
    In 1845, Robert Graham’s death created a vacancy for the traditionally dual appointment to the University of Edinburgh’s chair of botany and the Regius Keepership of the Edinburgh Royal Botanic Garden. John Hutton Balfour and Joseph Hooker emerged as the leading candidates. The contest quickly became embroiled in long running controversies over the nature and control of Scottish university education at a time of particular social and political tension after a recent schism in Church of Scotland. The politics of the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  7.  13
    'Men of Science': Language, Identity and Professionalization in the Mid-Victorian Scientific Community.Ruth Barton - 2003 - History of Science 41 (1):73-119.