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  1. Experimental Accuracy, Operationalism, and Limits of Knowledge – 1925 to 1935.Mara Beller - 1988 - Science in Context 2 (1):147-162.
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  • Einstein and Bohr's Rhetoric of Complementarity.Mara Beller - 1993 - Science in Context 6 (1):241-255.
  • Criticism and Revolutions.Mara Beller - 1997 - Science in Context 10 (1):13-37.
  • The Peculiar Notion of Exchange Forces—I: Origins in Quantum Mechanics, 1926–1928.Cathryn Carson - 1996 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 27 (1):23-45.
  • Erwin Schrödinger, Anschaulichkeit, and Quantum Theory.Henk W. de Regt - 1997 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 28 (4):461-481.
    Early in 1926 Erwin Schrodinger presented his famous theory of wave mechanics to account for atomic phenomena. It is often assumed that Schrodinger’s work reflected a realist philosophy. In this article, I will argue that this assumption is incorrect.
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  • The Equivalence Myth of Quantum Mechanics —Part I.F. A. Muller - 1997 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 28 (1):35-61.
    The author endeavours to show two things: first, that Schrödingers (and Eckarts) demonstration in March (September) 1926 of the equivalence of matrix mechanics, as created by Heisenberg, Born, Jordan and Dirac in 1925, and wave mechanics, as created by Schrödinger in 1926, is not foolproof; and second, that it could not have been foolproof, because at the time matrix mechanics and wave mechanics were neither mathematically nor empirically equivalent. That they were is the Equivalence Myth. In order to make the (...)
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  • The Equivalence Myth of Quantum Mechanics—Part II.F. A. Muller - 1997 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 28 (2):219-247.
    The author endeavours to show two things: first, that Schrödingers (and Eckarts) demonstration in March (September) 1926 of the equivalence of matrix mechanics, as created by Heisenberg, Born, Jordan and Dirac in 1925, and wave mechanics, as created by Schrödinger in 1926, is not foolproof; and second, that it could not have been foolproof, because at the time matrix mechanics and wave mechanics were neither mathematically nor empirically equivalent. That they were is the Equivalence Myth. In order to make the (...)
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  • Born's Probabilistic Interpretation: A Case Study of 'Concepts in Flux'.Mara Beller - 1990 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 21 (4):563-588.
  • The Birth of Bohr's Complementarity: The Context and the Dialogues.Mara Beller - 1992 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 23 (1):147-180.
  • Uncertainty in Bohr's Response to the Heisenberg Microscope.Scott Tanona - 2004 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 35 (3):483-507.
  • The Conceptual and the Anecdotal History of Quantum Mechanics.Mara Beller - 1996 - Foundations of Physics 26 (4):545-557.
    The aim of this paper is to combine the intellectual and the psychosocial aspects. blurring the distinction between the conceptual and the anecdotal history of quantum mechanics. The full realization of the importance of such “anecdotal” factors leads to the revision of our understanding of the conceptual development itself. The paper concludes with the suggestion that a major part of numerous inconsistencies in the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum physics are of a psychosocial origin.
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  • Bemerkungen Zur Interpretation, Bestätigung Und Progressivität der Frühen Matrizenmechanik.Thomas Bonk - 1994 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 25 (1):1 - 15.
    Remarks on Interpretation, Confirmation and Progressiveness of Early Matrix Mechanics. Our note discusses a case study in view of questions of theory-choice. We examine the extent to which the first 'complete, consistent exposition' of matrix mechanics in 1925 can be claimed to be reasonably confirmed, well interpreted and fruitful. Various strategies, by means of deductions and otherwise, by Born, Jordan and Heisenberg to establish these claims are critically assessed. It is shown that the outcome of the Bothe-Geiger experiment does not (...)
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