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  1. The Value of Diversity in Cognitive Science.Andrea Bender - 2019 - Topics in Cognitive Science 11 (4):853-863.
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  • The Cognitive Advantages of Counting Specifically: A Representational Analysis of Verbal Numeration Systems in Oceanic Languages.Andrea Bender, Dirk Schlimm & Sieghard Beller - 2015 - Topics in Cognitive Science 7 (4):552-569.
    The domain of numbers provides a paradigmatic case for investigating interactions of culture, language, and cognition: Numerical competencies are considered a core domain of knowledge, and yet the development of specifically human abilities presupposes cultural and linguistic input by way of counting sequences. These sequences constitute systems with distinct structural properties, the cross-linguistic variability of which has implications for number representation and processing. Such representational effects are scrutinized for two types of verbal numeration systems—general and object-specific ones—that were in parallel (...)
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  • The Power of 2: How an Apparently Irregular Numeration System Facilitates Mental Arithmetic.Andrea Bender & Sieghard Beller - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (1):158-187.
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  • Does Cognition Still Matter in Ethnobiology?David Ludwig - 2018 - Ethnobiology Letters 9 (2):269-275.
    Ethnobiology has become increasingly concerned with applied and normative questions about biocultural diversity and the livelihoods of local communities. While this development has created new opportunities for connecting ethnobiological research with ecological and social sciences, it also raises questions about the role of cognitive perspectives in current ethnobiology. In fact, there are clear signs of institutional separation as research on folkbiological cognition has increasingly found its home in the cognitive science community, weakening its ties to institutionalized ethnobiology. Rather than accepting (...)
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  • Current Perspectives on Cognitive Diversity.Andrea Bender & Sieghard Beller - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  • Causal Inferences About Others’ Behavior Among the Wampar, Papua New Guinea – and Why They Are Hard to Elicit.Bettina Beer & Andrea Bender - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  • Teacher and Learner: Supervised and Unsupervised Learning in Communities.Michael G. Shafto & Colleen M. Seifert - 2015 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 38.
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  • Anthropology in the Cognitive Sciences: The Value of Diversity.Sara J. Unsworth - 2012 - Topics in Cognitive Science 4 (3):429-436.
    Beller, Bender, and Medin (this issue) offer a provocative proposal outlining several reasons why anthropology and the rest of cognitive science might consider parting ways. Among those reasons, they suggest that separation might maintain the diversity needed to address larger problems facing humanity, and that the research strategies used across the disciplines are already so diverse as to be incommensurate. The present paper challenges the view that research strategies are incommensurate and offers a multimethod approach to cultural research that can (...)
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  • Exploring Cognitive Diversity: Anthropological Perspectives on Cognition.Sieghard Beller & Andrea Bender - 2015 - Topics in Cognitive Science 7 (4):548-551.
    Anthropology and the other cognitive sciences currently maintain a troubled relationship. What could rapprochement look like, and how could it be achieved? The seven main articles of this topic present anthropological or anthropologically inspired cross-cultural research on a diverse set of cognitive domains. They serve as an existence proof that not only do synergies abound across anthropology and the other cognitive sciences, but that they are worth achieving.
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  • Cognitive Anthropologists: Who Needs Them?Annelie Rothe - 2012 - Topics in Cognitive Science 4 (3):387-395.
    During the last decades, the cognitive sciences and cognitive anthropology have increasingly veered away from each other. Cognitive anthropologists have become so rare within the cognitive sciences that Beller, Bender, and Medin (this issue) even propose a division of the cognitive sciences and cognitive anthropology. However, such a divorce might be premature. This commentary tries to illustrate the benefits that cognitive anthropologists have to offer, not despite, but because of their combination of humanistic and scientific elements. It argues that the (...)
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  • Turning Tides: Prospects for More Diversity in Cognitive Science.Andrea Bender, Sieghard Beller & Douglas L. Medin - 2012 - Topics in Cognitive Science 4 (3):462-466.
    This conclusion of the debate on anthropology’s role in cognitive science provides some clarifications and an overview of emergent themes. It also lists, as cases of good practice, some examples of productive cross-disciplinary collaboration that evince a forward momentum in the relationship between anthropology and the other cognitive sciences.
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  • Why Anthropology Remains Integral to Cognitive Science.Jordan Kiper - 2014 - Topics in Cognitive Science 6 (1):151-152.
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  • Diversity as Asset.Andrea Bender, Sieghard Beller & Nancy J. Nersessian - 2015 - Topics in Cognitive Science 7 (4):677-688.
    We begin our commentary by summarizing the commonalities and differences in cognitive phenomena across cultures, as found by the seven papers of this topic. We then assess the commonalities and differences in how our various authors have approached the study of cognitive diversity, and speculate on the need for, and potential of, cross-disciplinary collaboration.
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  • Hearing Voices in Different Cultures: A Social Kindling Hypothesis.Tanya M. Luhrmann, R. Padmavati, Hema Tharoor & Akwasi Osei - 2015 - Topics in Cognitive Science 7 (4):646-663.
    This study compares 20 subjects, in each of three different settings, with serious psychotic disorder who hear voices, and compares their voice-hearing experience. We find that while there is much that is similar, there are notable differences in the kinds of voices that people seem to experience. In a California sample, people were more likely to describe their voices as intrusive unreal thoughts; in the South Indian sample, they were more likely to describe them as providing useful guidance; and in (...)
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  • To Naturalize or Not to Naturalize? An Issue for Cognitive Science as Well as Anthropology.Keith Stenning - 2012 - Topics in Cognitive Science 4 (3):413-419.
    Several of Beller, Bender, and Medin’s (2012) issues are as relevant within cognitive science as between it and anthropology. Knowledge-rich human mental processes impose hermeneutic tasks, both on subjects and researchers. Psychology's current philosophy of science is ill suited to analyzing these: Its demand for ‘‘stimulus control’’ needs to give way to ‘‘negotiation of mutual interpretation.’’ Cognitive science has ways to address these issues, as does anthropology. An example from my own work is about how defeasible logics are mathematical models (...)
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  • Archaeology Through Computational Linguistics: Inscription Statistics Predict Excavation Sites of Indus Valley Artifacts.Gabriel L. Recchia & Max M. Louwerse - 2016 - Cognitive Science 40 (8):2065-2080.
    Computational techniques comparing co-occurrences of city names in texts allow the relative longitudes and latitudes of cities to be estimated algorithmically. However, these techniques have not been applied to estimate the provenance of artifacts with unknown origins. Here, we estimate the geographic origin of artifacts from the Indus Valley Civilization, applying methods commonly used in cognitive science to the Indus script. We show that these methods can accurately predict the relative locations of archeological sites on the basis of artifacts of (...)
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  • Diversifying the Knowledge Base.Michele I. Feist - 2014 - Topics in Cognitive Science 6 (1):146-147.
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  • Space and Culture: Giving Directions in Tonga.Giovanni Bennardo - 2014 - Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 42 (3):253-276.
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  • Revisiting the Limits of Language: The Odor Lexicon of Maniq.Ewelina Wnuk & Asifa Majid - 2014 - Cognition 131 (1):125-138.
  • Probing the Cultural Constitution of Causal Cognition – A Research Program.Andrea Bender & Sieghard Beller - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  • All Forms of Writing.Greg Downey - 2014 - Mind and Language 29 (3):304-319.
    Anthropological contributions are essential to understanding the evolution of writing and its potential variation. Although Stanislas Dehaene calls for a ‘neuro-anthropological perspective’, he neglects anthropological evidence, including the only indisputable case of independent invention of writing: the pre-Columbian systems of the Americas. Here I argue that anthropological and historical accounts of the cultural evolution of language suggest that ecological, technological, social and political factors have all influenced the ongoing development of writing systems, even in directions contrary to that predicted by (...)
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  • Current Trends in Cultural Particularism: The Problem Does Seem to Lie With Anthropology.Hector N. Qirko - 2014 - Topics in Cognitive Science 6 (1):155-156.
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