Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Repetition and Difference: Lefebvre, le Corbusier and Modernity's (Im)Moral Landscape.Mick Smith - 2001 - Ethics, Place and Environment 4 (1):31 – 44.
    If, as Lefebvre argues, every society produces its own social space, then modernity might be characterized by that (anti-)social and instrumental space epitomized and idealized in Le Corbusier's writings. This repetitively patterned space consumes and regulates the differences between places and people; it encapsulates a normalizing morality that seeks to reduce all differences to an economic order of the Same. Lefebvre's dialectical conceptualization of 'difference' can both help explain the operation of this (im)moral landscape and offer the possibility of alternative (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • Liberating Possibilities of a New Identity: A Review of Christi van der Westhuizen’s Sitting Pretty: White Afrikaans Women in Postapartheid South Africa. [REVIEW]Tanya van Wyk - 2018 - Hts Theological Studies 74 (4):1-3.
    In this article, Christi van der Westhuizen's sociopolitical contribution in her publication, Sitting Pretty: White Afrikaans Women in Postapartheid South Africa, is reviewed. In light of the official end of apartheid in 1994, South Africans are attempting to define a new identity. Van der Westhuizen's publication focusses on how the identity of white Afrikaans women, as both the oppressor and the oppressed, influences and contributes to the endeavour of a search for new identity. In deconstructing and re-imagining new identity, Van (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Ciencia y Paraciencia En la Imagen: Alexander Tsiaras, Anatomical Travelogue/The Visual MD.Manuel González de Ávila - 2018 - Arbor 194 (790):486.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Technical Mediation and Subjectivation: Tracing and Extending Foucault’s Philosophy of Technology. [REVIEW]Steven Dorrestijn - 2012 - Philosophy and Technology 25 (2):221-241.
    This article focuses on tracing and extending Michel Foucault’s contributions to the philosophy of technology. At first sight his work on power seems the most relevant. In his later work on subjectivation and ethics technology is absent. However, notably by recombining Foucault’s work on power with his work on subjectivation, does his work contribute to solving pertinent problems in current approaches to the ethics of technology. First, Foucault’s position is compared to critical theory and Heidegger, and associated with the approach (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Shadow and Shade: The Ethopoietics of Enlightenment.Mick Smith - 2003 - Ethics, Place and Environment 6 (2):117 – 130.
    Modern Western thought and culture have envisaged their task in terms of a metaphorics, a metaphysics and a technics of 'enlightenment'. However, the ethical and environmental implications of this determination to dispel all shadows have become increasingly pernicious as modernity both extends and alters the conceptualization and employment of (a now artificial) light as a tool of discovery and control. Drawing on the work of Foucault and Benjamin amongst others, this paper seeks to illustrate, through a critical ethopoietics, the 'speculative (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Privacy Expectations at Work—What is Reasonable and Why?Elin Palm - 2009 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 12 (2):201-215.
    Throughout the longstanding debate on privacy, the concept has been framed in various ways. Most often it has been discussed as an area within which individuals rightfully may expect to be left alone and in terms of certain data that they should be entitled to control. The sphere in which individuals should be granted freedom from intrusion has typically been equated with the indisputably private domestic sphere. Privacy claims in the semi-public area of work have not been sufficiently investigated. In (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • The Convergence of Virtual Reality and Social Networks: Threats to Privacy and Autonomy.Fiachra O’Brolcháin, Tim Jacquemard, David Monaghan, Noel O’Connor, Peter Novitzky & Bert Gordijn - 2016 - Science and Engineering Ethics 22 (1):1-29.
    The rapid evolution of information, communication and entertainment technologies will transform the lives of citizens and ultimately transform society. This paper focuses on ethical issues associated with the likely convergence of virtual realities and social networks, hereafter VRSNs. We examine a scenario in which a significant segment of the world’s population has a presence in a VRSN. Given the pace of technological development and the popularity of these new forms of social interaction, this scenario is plausible. However, it brings with (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • The Elite Athlete - In a State of Exception?Lev Kreft - 2009 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 3 (1):3-18.
    At IAPS Ljubljana conference (September 2007) Dag Vidar Hanstad and Sigmund Loland presented a paper on elite-level athletes' duty to provide information on their whereabouts, to decide between two opposing positions: is this WADA demand justifiable anti-doping work or an indefensible surveillance regime? They concluded that on moral grounds this regime is conditionally acceptable, the condition being the acceptability of a general framework and objectives embodied in anti-doping global legislative foundations (the World Anti-Doping Code). But, as they said, principled objections (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Personal Autonomy in the Travel Panopticon.Eamon Daly - 2010 - Ethics and Information Technology 12 (2):97-108.
    I argue in this paper that the development and convergence of information and communication technologies (ICT) is creating a global network of surveillance capabilities which affect the traveler. These surveillance capabilities are reminiscent of 18th century philosopher Jeremy Bentham’s panopticon, and as such the emerging global surveillance network has been referred to as the travel panopticon. I argue that the travel panopticon is corrosive of personal autonomy, and in doing so I describe and analyse various philosophical approaches to personal autonomy.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Contextualizing Corporate Political Responsibilities: Neoliberal CSR in Historical Perspective.Marie-Laure Djelic & Helen Etchanchu - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 142 (4):641-661.
    This article provides a historical contextualization of Corporate Social Responsibility and its political role. CSR, we propose, is one form of business–society interactions reflecting a unique ideological framing. To make that argument, we compare contemporary CSR with two historical ideal-types. We explore in turn paternalism in nineteenth century Europe and managerial trusteeship in early twentieth century US. We outline how the political responsibilities of business were constructed, negotiated, and practiced in both cases. This historical contextualization shows that the frontier between (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • Mapping Teacher-Faces.Greg Thompson & Ian Cook - 2013 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 32 (4):379-395.
    This paper uses Deleuze and Guattari’s concept of faciality to analyse the teacher’s face. According to Deleuze and Guattari, the teacher-face is a special type of face because it is an ’overcoded’ face produced in specific landscapes. This paper suggests four limit-faces for teacher faciality that actualise different mixes of signifiance and subjectification in a classroom in which individualisation and massifications are affected. Understanding these limit-faces suggests new ways to conceive the affects actualised in the classroom that are subjected to (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation