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Jan Berg (1962). Bolzano's Logic.

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  1.  71
    On Defining the Notion of Complete and Immediate Formal Grounding.Francesca Poggiolesi - 2016 - Synthese 193 (10).
    The aim of this paper is to provide a definition of the the notion of complete and immediate formal grounding through the concepts of derivability and complexity. It will be shown that this definition yields a subtle and precise analysis of the concept of grounding in several paradigmatic cases.
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  2.  30
    On Bolzano's Concept of a Sum.Paul Rusnock - 2013 - History and Philosophy of Logic 34 (2):155 - 169.
    Alongside his groundbreaking work in logic, Bernard Bolzano (1781?1848) made important contributions to ontology, notably with his theory of collections. Recent work has done much to elucidate Bolzano's conceptions, but his notion of a sum has proved stubbornly resistant to complete understanding. This paper offers a new interpretation of Bolzano's concept of a sum. I argue that, although Bolzano's presentation is defective, his conception is unexceptionable, and has important applications, notably in his work on the foundations of arithmetic.
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  3.  13
    Das Problem der Apagogischen Beweise in Bolzanos Beyträgen Und Seiner Wissenschaftslehre.Stefania Centrone - 2012 - History and Philosophy of Logic 33 (2):127 - 157.
    This paper analyzes and evaluates Bolzano's remarks on the apagogic method of proof with reference to his juvenile booklet ?Contributions to a better founded presentation of mathematics? of 1810 and to his ?Theory of science? (1837). I shall try to defend the following contentions: (1) Bolzanos? vain attempt to transform all indirect proofs into direct proofs becomes comprehensible as soon as one recognizes the following facts: (1.1) his attitude towards indirect proofs with an affirmative conclusion differs from his stance to (...)
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  4.  31
    Wogegen wandte sich Husserl 1891?Deodáth Zuh - 2012 - Husserl Studies 28 (2):95-120.
    Eine vollständige Darstellung von Edmund Husserls Verhältnis zu Gottlob Frege steht noch aus, so dass es nicht verwundert, einige Missverständnisse, dieses Verhältnis betreffend, im Umlauf zu finden. Selbst scheinbar längst überwundene systematische Dogmen tauchen wieder auf, so z.B. die Auffassung, dass Husserl nicht nur entscheidend von Gottlob Frege beeinflusst wurde, sondern darüber hinaus auch seine schärfste Frege-Kritik 1891 zurückgenommen habe. Mein Beitrag enthält eine überwiegend historisch vorgehende Entgegnung auf solche fälschlich vertretenen Ansichten wie sie sich auch in dem neu erschienenen (...)
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  5. The Analytic-Synthetic Distinction and the Classical Model of Science: Kant, Bolzano and Frege.Willem R. de Jong - 2010 - Synthese 174 (2):237-261.
    This paper concentrates on some aspects of the history of the analytic-synthetic distinction from Kant to Bolzano and Frege. This history evinces considerable continuity but also some important discontinuities. The analytic-synthetic distinction has to be seen in the first place in relation to a science, i.e. an ordered system of cognition. Looking especially to the place and role of logic it will be argued that Kant, Bolzano and Frege each developed the analytic-synthetic distinction within the same conception of scientific rationality, (...)
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  6. The Classical Model of Science: A Millennia-Old Model of Scientific Rationality.Willem R. de Jong & Arianna Betti - 2010 - Synthese 174 (2):185-203.
    Throughout more than two millennia philosophers adhered massively to ideal standards of scientific rationality going back ultimately to Aristotle’s Analytica posteriora . These standards got progressively shaped by and adapted to new scientific needs and tendencies. Nevertheless, a core of conditions capturing the fundamentals of what a proper science should look like remained remarkably constant all along. Call this cluster of conditions the Classical Model of Science . In this paper we will do two things. First of all, we will (...)
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  7.  27
    The Analytic-Synthetic Distinction and the Classical Model of Science: Kant, Bolzano and Frege.Willem R. De Jong - 2010 - Synthese 174 (2):237 - 261.
    This paper concentrates on some aspects of the history of the analyticsynthetic distinction from Kant to Bolzano and Frege. This history evinces considerable continuity but also some important discontinuities. The analytic-synthetic distinction has to be seen in the first place in relation to a science, i.e. an ordered system of cognition. Looking especially to the place and role of logic it will be argued that Kant, Bolzano and Frege each developed the analytic-synthetic distinction within the same conception of scientific rationality, (...)
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  8. Etchemendy and Bolzano on Logical Consequence.Paul Rusnock & Mark Burke - 2010 - History and Philosophy of Logic 31 (1):3-29.
    In a series of publications beginning in the 1980s, John Etchemendy has argued that the standard semantical account of logical consequence, due in its essentials to Alfred Tarski, is fundamentally mistaken. He argues that, while Tarski's definition requires us to classify the terms of a language as logical or non-logical, no such division is guaranteed to deliver the correct extension of our pre-theoretical or intuitive consequence relation. In addition, and perhaps more importantly, Tarski's account is claimed to be incapable of (...)
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  9.  15
    Substitution: An Additional Conception of Analysis in the Early Analytic and Phenomenological Traditions?: On Beaney.Sandra Lapointe - 2002 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 40 (S1):101-113.
  10.  41
    The Variety of Consequence, According to Bolzano.Johan Benthem - 1985 - Studia Logica 44 (4):389 - 403.
    Contemporary historians of logic tend to credit Bernard Bolzano with the invention of the semantic notion, of consequence, a full century before Tarski. Nevertheless, Bolzano's work played no significant rôle in the genesis of modern logical semantics. The purpose of this paper is to point out three highly original, and still quite relevant themes in Bolzano's work, being a systematic study of possible types of inference, of consistency, as well as their meta-theory. There are certain analogies with Tarski's concerns here, (...)
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  11.  33
    Bolzano's Deducibility and Tarski's Logical Consequence.Paul B. Thompson - 1981 - History and Philosophy of Logic 2 (1-2):11-20.
    In this paper I argue that Bolzano's concept of deducibility and Tarski's concept of logical consequence differ with respect to their philosophical intent. I distinguish between epistemic and ontic approaches to logic, and argue that Bolzano's deducibility presupposes an epistemic approach, while Tarski's logical consequence presupposes an ontic approach.
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