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Levinas and the Struggle for Existence

In Eric Sean Nelson, Antje Kapust & Kent Still (eds.), Addressing Levinas. Northwestern University Press. pp. 170--184 (2005)

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  1. The Sobering Up of Oedipus Levinas and the Trauma of Responsibility.Cynthia D. Coe - 2013 - Angelaki 18 (4):5-21.
    Levinas's work persistently challenges the claim that the sovereignty of the ego is the foundation for ethics, a claim he attributes to the Greek philosophical tradition. This claim emerges in dominant accounts of responsibility, in which the agent's intentions define his or her culpability. However, in Oedipus Tyrannos Sophocles also attempts to undermine this strict pairing of responsibility and deliberate choice. Oedipus undergoes a fundamentally Levinasian narrative arc by moving from self-assured sovereignty, based on his ability to comprehend the world, (...)
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  • The End of Man.Jean-Paul Martinon - 2013 - Punctum Books.
    Masculinity? This book attempts to answer this one-word question by revisiting key philosophical concepts in the construction of masculinity, not in order to re-write or debunk them again, but in order to provide a radically new departure to what masculinity means today. This new departure focuses on an understanding of sexuality and gender that is neither structured in oppositional terms nor in performative terms, but in a perpendicular relation akin to that which brings space and time together. In doing so, (...)
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  • Emmanuel Levinas, Radical Orthodoxy, and an Ontology of Originary Peace.Brock Bahler - 2014 - Journal of Religious Ethics 42 (3):516-539.
    Radical Orthodoxy, a growing movement among contemporary Christian theologians, argues that the prominent philosophical paradigms of modern and postmodern thought lack transcendence, are ultimately nihilistic, and are guided by an ontology of violence. Among the thinkers Radical Orthodoxy criticizes are Hegel, Nietzsche, and Hobbes, but surprisingly also the Jewish philosopher Emmanuel Levinas, whom they claim offers an ethics for nihilists. In this essay, I analyze the claims of two prominent thinkers in Radical Orthodoxy, John Milbank and Catherine Pickstock, and argue (...)
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