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  1. Eco-evo-devo and iterated learning: towards an integrated approach in the light of niche construction.José Segovia-Martín & Sergio Balari - 2020 - Biology and Philosophy 35 (4):1-23.
    In this paper we argue that ecological evolutionary developmental biology accounts of cognitive modernity are compatible with cultural evolution theories of language built upon iterated learning models. Cultural evolution models show that the emergence of near universal properties of language do not require the preexistence of strong specific constraints. Instead, the development of general abilities, unrelated to informational specificity, like the copying of complex signals and sharing of communicative intentions is required for cultural evolution to yield specific properties, such as (...)
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  • Constructing a Consensus on Language Evolution? Convergences and Differences Between Biolinguistic and Usage-Based Approaches.Michael Pleyer & Stefan Hartmann - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
    Two of the main theoretical approaches to the evolution of language are biolinguistics and usage-based approaches. Both are often conceptualized as belonging to seemingly irreconcilable ‘camps.’ Biolinguistic approaches assume that the ability to acquire language is based on a language-specific genetic foundation. Usage-based approaches, on the other hand, stress the importance of domain-general cognitive capacities, social cognition, and interaction. However, there have been a number of recent developments in both paradigms which suggest that biolinguistic and usage-based approaches are actually moving (...)
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  • How Did Language Evolve? Some Reflections on the Language Parasite Debate.Tzu-wei Hung - 2019 - Biological Theory 14 (4):214-223.
    The language parasite approach refers to the view that language, like a parasite, is an adaptive system that evolves to fit its human hosts. Supported by recent computer simulations, LPA proponents claim that the reason that humans can use languages with ease is not because we have evolved with genetically specified linguistic instincts but because languages have adapted to the preexisting brain structures of humans. This article examines the LPA. It argues that, while the LPA has advantages over its rival, (...)
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  • 文法能力の生得主義.Shun Tsugita - 2017 - Kagaku Tetsugaku 50:107-127.
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  • Merge-Generability as the Key Concept of Human Language: Evidence From Neuroscience.Kyohei Tanaka, Isso Nakamura, Shinri Ohta, Naoki Fukui, Mihoko Zushi, Hiroki Narita & Kuniyoshi L. Sakai - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
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  • The evolution of linguistic rules.Matthew Spike - 2017 - Biology and Philosophy 32 (6):887-904.
    Rule-like behaviour is found throughout human language, provoking a number of apparently conflicting explanations. This paper frames the topic in terms of Tinbergen’s four questions and works within the context of rule-like behaviour seen both in nature and the non-linguistic domain in humans. I argue for a minimal account of linguistic rules which relies on powerful domain-general cognition, has a communicative function allowing for multiple engineering solutions, and evolves mainly culturally, while leaving the door open for some genetic adaptation in (...)
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  • What’s wrong with the minimal conception of innateness in cognitive science?J. Brendan Ritchie - 2020 - Synthese 199 (Suppl 1):159-176.
    One of the classic debates in cognitive science is between nativism and empiricism about the development of psychological capacities. In principle, the debate is empirical. However, in practice nativist hypotheses have also been challenged for relying on an ill-defined, or even unscientific, notion of innateness as that which is “not learned”. Here this minimal conception of innateness is defended on four fronts. First, it is argued that the minimal conception is crucial to understanding the nativism-empiricism debate, when properly construed; Second, (...)
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  • Developmental Constraints on Learning Artificial Grammars with Fixed, Flexible and Free Word Order.Iga Nowak & Giosuè Baggio - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
  • The Influence of Shared Visual Context on the Successful Emergence of Conventions in a Referential Communication Task.Thomas F. Müller, James Winters & Olivier Morin - 2019 - Cognitive Science 43 (9).
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  • How children perceive fractals: Hierarchical self-similarity and cognitive development.Maurício Dias Martins, Sabine Laaha, Eva Maria Freiberger, Soonja Choi & W. Tecumseh Fitch - 2014 - Cognition 133 (1):10-24.
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  • A new perspective on word order preferences: the availability of a lexicon triggers the use of SVO word order.Hanna Marno, Alan Langus, Mahmoud Omidbeigi, Sina Asaadi, Shima Seyed-Allaei & Marina Nespor - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  • Notational Variants and Invariance in Linguistics.Kent Johnson - 2015 - Mind and Language 30 (2):162-186.
    This article argues that the much-maligned ‘notational variants’ of a given formal linguistic theory play a role similar to alternative numerical measurement scales. Thus, they can be used to identify the invariant components of the grammar; i.e., those features that do not depend on the choice of empirically equivalent representation. Treating these elements as the ‘meaningful’ structure of language has numerous consequences for the philosophy of science and linguistics. I offer several such examples of how linguistic theorizing can profit from (...)
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  • Infinite Generation of Language Unreachable From a Stepwise Approach.M. A. C. Huybregts - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
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  • Meaningful questions: The acquisition of auxiliary inversion in a connectionist model of sentence production.Hartmut Fitz & Franklin Chang - 2017 - Cognition 166 (C):225-250.
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  • Nativism, Empiricism, and Ockham’s Razor.Simon Fitzpatrick - 2015 - Erkenntnis 80 (5):895-922.
    This paper discusses the role that appeals to theoretical simplicity have played in the debate between nativists and empiricists in cognitive science. Both sides have been keen to make use of such appeals in defence of their respective positions about the structure and ontogeny of the human mind. Focusing on the standard simplicity argument employed by empiricist-minded philosophers and cognitive scientists—what I call “the argument for minimal innateness”—I identify various problems with such arguments—in particular, the apparent arbitrariness of the relevant (...)
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  • The Structure of Semantic Competence: Compositionality as an Innate Constraint of The Faculty of Language.Guillermo Del Pinal - 2015 - Mind and Language 30 (4):375–413.
    This paper defends the view that the Faculty of Language is compositional, i.e., that it computes the meaning of complex expressions from the meanings of their immediate constituents and their structure. I fargue that compositionality and other competing constraints on the way in which the Faculty of Language computes the meanings of complex expressions should be understood as hypotheses about innate constraints of the Faculty of Language. I then argue that, unlike compositionality, most of the currently available non-compositional constraints predict (...)
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  • What exactly is Universal Grammar, and has anyone seen it?Ewa Dąbrowska - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
  • Complexity in Language Acquisition.Alexander Clark & Shalom Lappin - 2013 - Topics in Cognitive Science 5 (1):89-110.
    Learning theory has frequently been applied to language acquisition, but discussion has largely focused on information theoretic problems—in particular on the absence of direct negative evidence. Such arguments typically neglect the probabilistic nature of cognition and learning in general. We argue first that these arguments, and analyses based on them, suffer from a major flaw: they systematically conflate the hypothesis class and the learnable concept class. As a result, they do not allow one to draw significant conclusions about the learner. (...)
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  • Do submarines swim? Methodological dualism and anthropomorphizing AlphaGo.Vincent J. Carchidi - forthcoming - AI and Society:1-13.
    The victories of the Go-playing artificial intelligence “AlphaGo” against professional player Lee Sedol in 2016 had a profound impact on public and academic perceptions of AI. This event shocked observers, as the ability of a machine to defeat a world champion human in a highly complex game seemed to indicate that a machine had achieved human-like—or more than human—intelligence. But why was AlphaGo so readily anthropomorphized by academic and non-academic audiences alike? Drawing from existing analyses of reactions to and arguments (...)
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  • The not face: A grammaticalization of facial expressions of emotion.C. Fabian Benitez-Quiroz, Ronnie B. Wilbur & Aleix M. Martinez - 2016 - Cognition 150:77-84.
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  • Simple is not easy.Edison Barrios - 2016 - Synthese 193 (7):2261-2305.
    I review and challenge the views on simplicity and its role in linguistics put forward by Ludlow. In particular, I criticize the claim that simplicity—in the sense pertinent to science—is nothing more than ease of use or “user-friendliness”, motivated by economy of labor. I argue that Ludlow’s discussion fails to do justice to the diversity of factors that are relevant to simplicity considerations. This, in turn, leads to the neglect of crucial cases in which the rationale for simplification is unmistakably (...)
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  • Grammar, Ontology, and the Unity of Meaning.Ulrich Reichard - 2013 - Dissertation, University of Durham
    Words have meaning. Sentences also have meaning, but their meaning is different in kind from any collection of the meanings of the words they contain. I discuss two puzzles related to this difference. The first is how the meanings of the parts of a sentence combine to give rise to a unified sentential meaning, as opposed to a mere collection of disparate meanings (UP1). The second is why the formal ontology of linguistic meaning changes when grammatical structure is built up (...)
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