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Richard J. Bernstein (2002). Radical Evil: A Philosophical Interrogation.

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  1.  5
    Evil and Religion: Ricoeurian Impulses for Theology in a Postsecular Climate.Petruschka Schaafsma - 2015 - International Journal of Philosophy and Theology 76 (2):129-148.
    Starting point of this article is a tension perceived in postsecular reassessments of religion between a new openness to religion’s meaning and importance and a negative motivation, due to religion’s violent presence. These negative conditions may hinder assessing religion in its fullness and specific character. Further reflection on the right attitude to study religion and a way out of this tension is given by analyzing Paul Ricoeur philosophical approach to religion in The Symbolism of Evil. A detailed investigation of Ricoeur’s (...)
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  2.  70
    The Lutheran Influence on Kant's Depraved Will.Dennis Vanden Auweele - 2013 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 73 (2):117-134.
    Contemporary Kant-scholarship has a tendency to allign Kant’s understanding of depravity closer to Erasmus than Luther in their famous debate on the freedom of the will (1520–1527). While, at face value, some paragraphs do warrant such a claim, I will argue that Kant’s understanding of the radical evil will draws closer to Luther than Erasmus in a number of elements. These elements are (1) the intervention of the Wille for progress towards the good, (2) a positive choice for evil, (3) (...)
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  3.  14
    The Scene and the Crime: Can Critical Realists Talk About Good and Evil?Alan Norrie - 2012 - Journal of Critical Realism 11 (1):76-93.
    This essay argues that critical realism provides a philosophical perspective from which to talk about good and evil. It draws on dialectical critical realism’s meta-ethics of freedom and solidarity, and the different grades of freedom identified there: from the basic spontaneity in agency to the possibility of a fully flourishing, eudaimonic social condition. It argues that evil acts can be understood as those which fundamentally deny basic human freedom (spontaneity) and solidarity, and that good acts are those which affirm human (...)
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  4.  24
    "The Trail of the Human Serpent is Over Everything": Jamesian Perspectives on Mind, World, and Religion. By Sami Pihlström.Russell B. Goodman - 2010 - Metaphilosophy 41 (1-2):235-239.
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  5.  50
    The Relevance of Hannah Arendt's Reflections on Evil: Globalization and Rightlessness. [REVIEW]Patrick Hayden - 2010 - Human Rights Review 11 (4):451-467.
    The centenary of Hannah Arendt’s birth in 2006 has provided the catalyst for a body of literature grappling with the legacy of her thought, especially the question of its enduring political relevance. Yet this literature largely excludes from consideration a significant aspect of Arendt’s legacy, namely, her account of evil and its devastating political reality. This article contends that the neglect of Arendt’s understanding of the dynamic reality of evil unnecessarily delimits the opportunities her legacy affords to diagnose forms of (...)
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  6. Kant's Quasi-Transcendental Argument for a Necessary and Universal Evil Propensity in Human Nature.Stephen Palmquist - 2008 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 46 (2):261-297.
    In Part One of Religion within the Bounds of Bare Reason, Kant repeatedly refers to a “proof ” that human nature has a necessary and universal “evil propensity,” but he provides only obscure hints at its location. Interpreters have failed to identify such an argument in Part One. After examining relevant passages, summarizing recent attempts to reconstruct the argument, and explaining why these do not meet Kant’s stated needs, I argue that the elusive proof must have atranscendental form (called quasi-transcendental (...)
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  7.  60
    Religion and Pseudo-Religion: An Elusive Boundary.Sami Pihlström - 2007 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 62 (1):3-32.
    This paper examines the possibility of setting a boundary between religion and “pseudo-religion” (or superstition). Philosophers of religion inspired by Ludwig Wittgenstein’s ideas, in particular, insist that religious language-use can be neither legitimated nor criticized from the perspective of non-religious language-games. Thus, for example, the “theodicist” requirement that the existence of evil should be theoretically reconciled with theism can be argued to be pseudo-religious (superstitious). Another example discussed in the paper is the relation between religion and morality. The paper concludes (...)
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  8.  13
    Transcendental Guilt: On an Emotional Condition of Moral Experience.Sami Pihlström - 2007 - Journal of Religious Ethics 35 (1):87-111.
    This article considers a central ethically relevant interpersonal emotion, guilt. It is argued that guilt, as an irreducible moral category, has a constitutive role to play in our ways of conceptualizing our relations to other people. Without experiencing guilt, or being able to do so, we would not be capable of employing the moral concepts and judgments we do employ. Elaborating on this argument, the paper deals with what may be described as the "metaphysics of guilt." More generally, it is (...)
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  9.  21
    An End to Evil? Philosophical and Political Reflections.Fred Dallmayr - 2006 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 60 (1/3):169 - 186.
    After a long period of neglect and complacency, the problem of evil has powerfully resurfaced in our time. Two events above all have triggered this resurgence: the atrocities of totalitarianism (summarized under the label of "Auschwitz") and the debacle of September 11 and its aftermath. Following September 11, a "war on terror" has been unleashed and some writers have advocated an all-out assault on, and military victory over, evil. Taking issue with this proposal, the paper first of all examines the (...)
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  10.  2
    An End to Evil? Philosophical and Political Reflections.Fred Dallmayr - 2006 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 60 (1-3):169-186.
    After a long period of neglect and complacency, the problem of evil has powerfully resurfaced in our time. Two events above all have triggered this resurgence: the atrocities of totalitarianism and the debacle of September 11 and its aftermath. Following September 11, a "war on terror" has been unleashed and some writers have advocated an all-out assault on, and military victory over, evil. Taking issue with this proposal, the paper first of all examines the meaning of "evil" as articulated by (...)
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  11. Claudia Card's Atrocity Paradigm.Maríaa Pía Lara - 2004 - Hypatia 19 (4):186-193.
    This paper deals with Claudia Card's important contributions to a theory of evil that steps out from traditional models of thinking about this problem (theodicies, metaphysical theories, etc.). Instead, our author seeks to explore important elements from other theorists (such as Kant and Nietzsche) in order to build up her ideas of what she calls the "atrocity paradigm." This critical essay focuses mainly in the spaces where Card's conclusions need to rethink the limits and constraints of her theory.
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  12.  29
    Claudia Card's Atrocity Paradigm.María Pía Lara - 2004 - Hypatia 19 (4):184-191.
    This paper deals with Claudia Card's important contributions to a theory of evil that steps out from traditional models of thinking about this problem . Instead, our author seeks to explore important elements from other theorists in order to build up her ideas of what she calls the "atrocity paradigm." This critical essay focuses mainly in the spaces where Card's conclusions need to rethink the limits and constraints of her theory.
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  13.  2
    Claudia Card's Atrocity Paradigm.María Pía Lara - 2004 - Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy 19 (4):184-191.
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