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Richard J. Bernstein (2013). The Abuse of Evil: The Corruption of Politics and Religion Since 9/11.

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  1.  8
    “The Call to Do Justice”: Superheroes, Sovereigns and the State During Wartime.Jason Bainbridge - 2015 - International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 28 (4):745-763.
    This paper maps superheroes as signifiers of substantive justice and their relationship with the state across two Coverian nomoi, World War II and the “war on terror”. It is argued that the central concern of most superhero narratives is justice, exploring both what it means and how it can best be articulated. This “call to do justice” becomes even more important during wartime where superheroes become agitators for cultural change, appropriating the sovereign decision during states of exception even as they (...)
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  2.  5
    Evil and Religion: Ricoeurian Impulses for Theology in a Postsecular Climate.Petruschka Schaafsma - 2015 - International Journal of Philosophy and Theology 76 (2):129-148.
    Starting point of this article is a tension perceived in postsecular reassessments of religion between a new openness to religion’s meaning and importance and a negative motivation, due to religion’s violent presence. These negative conditions may hinder assessing religion in its fullness and specific character. Further reflection on the right attitude to study religion and a way out of this tension is given by analyzing Paul Ricoeur philosophical approach to religion in The Symbolism of Evil. A detailed investigation of Ricoeur’s (...)
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  3.  22
    Evil Collectives.Geoffrey Scarre - 2012 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 36 (1):74-92.
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    Breaking the Symbolic Alienation: The New Role and Chalenges of Critical Philosophy in Next Millennium.Maximiliano Korstanje & Geoffrey Skoll - 2011 - Cultura 8 (2):105-126.
    Name der Zeitschrift: Cultura. International Journal of Philosophy of Culture and Axiology Jahrgang: 8 Heft: 2 Seiten: 105-126.
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  5.  49
    The Relevance of Hannah Arendt's Reflections on Evil: Globalization and Rightlessness. [REVIEW]Patrick Hayden - 2010 - Human Rights Review 11 (4):451-467.
    The centenary of Hannah Arendt’s birth in 2006 has provided the catalyst for a body of literature grappling with the legacy of her thought, especially the question of its enduring political relevance. Yet this literature largely excludes from consideration a significant aspect of Arendt’s legacy, namely, her account of evil and its devastating political reality. This article contends that the neglect of Arendt’s understanding of the dynamic reality of evil unnecessarily delimits the opportunities her legacy affords to diagnose forms of (...)
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  6. The Question of Evil and Feminist Legal Scholarship.Thérèse Murphy & Noel Whitty - 2006 - Feminist Legal Studies 14 (1):1-26.
    In this article, we argue that feminist legal scholars should engage directly and explicitly with the question of evil. Part I summarises key facts surrounding the prosecution and life-long imprisonment of Myra Hindley, one of a tiny number of women involved in multiple killings of children in recent British history. Part II reviews a range of commentaries on Hindley, noting in particular the repeated use of two narratives: the first of these insists that Hindley is an icon of female evil; (...)
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