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  1. A Nietzschean Re‐Evaluation of Values as a Way of Re‐Imagining Business Ethics.Payman Tajalli & Steven Segal - 2019 - Business Ethics: A European Review 28 (2):234-242.
    Whereas a range of business and management scholars have argued that business is in an ethical crisis, Nietzsche makes it possible to see that it is ethics itself that is in crisis, and that only as the crisis in ethics is dealt with can ethics in specific areas such as business be addressed. Nihilism is the name that Nietzsche gives to the crisis in ethics. The failure to fully appreciate nihilism and its pervasiveness as the root cause of the problem, (...)
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  • The Business School’s Right to Operate: Responsibilization and Resistance.David Murillo & Steen Vallentin - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 136 (4):743-757.
    The current crisis has come at a cost not only for big business but also for business schools. Business schools have been deemed largely responsible for developing and teaching socially dysfunctional curricula that, if anything, has served to promote and accelerate the kind of ruthless behavior and lack of self-restraint and social irresponsibility among top executives that have been seen as causing the crisis. As a result, many calls have been made for business schools to accept their responsibilities as social (...)
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  • Islamic Corporate Financing: Does It Promote Profit and Loss Sharing?Marizah Minhat & Nazam Dzolkarnaini - 2016 - Business Ethics: A European Review 25 (4):482-497.
    Islamic financing instruments can be categorised into profit and loss/risk sharing and non-participatory instruments. Although profit and loss sharing instruments such as musharakah are widely accepted as the ideal form of Islamic financing, prior studies suggest that alternative instruments such as murabahah are preferred by Islamic banks. Nevertheless, prior studies did not explore factors that influence the use of Islamic financing among non-financial firms. Our study fills this gap and contributes new knowledge in several ways. First, we find no evidence (...)
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  • You Reap What You Sow: How MBA Programs Undermine Ethics.Matthias Philip Hühn - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 121 (4):527-541.
    This paper argues that the MBA, probably the most successful academic program of the last 50 years, negatively affects the theory and practice of management with regard to ethics through its pedagogy, structure, and its underlying epistemic assumptions. In particular I seek to demonstrate how the syllabus, the pedagogy and the epistemological assumptions of MBA programs together make managers/leaders unable and unwilling to deal with ethics. I also argue that while the what and the how play a very important role, (...)
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