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  1. Intentionality and Thinking as ‘Hearing’. A Response to Biesta’s Agenda.Vasco D’Agnese - 2016 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 48 (3).
    In his 2012 article Philosophy of Education for the Public Good: Five Challenges and an Agenda, Gert Biesta identifies five substantial issues about the future of education and the work required to address these issues. This article employs a Heideggerian reading of education to evaluate ‘Biesta’s truth’. I argue that Biesta’s point of view underestimates knowledge’s predominance and relativism; frames intentionality in pre-Heideggerian terms, which—although not a problem in itself because an individual is free to choose a particular perspective on (...)
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  • Philosophy, Exposure, and Children: How to Resist the Instrumentalisation of Philosophy in Education.Gert Biesta - 2011 - Philosophy of Education 45 (2):305-319.
    The use of philosophy in educational programmes and practices under such names as philosophy for children, philosophy with children, or the community of philosophical enquiry, has become well established in many countries around the world. The main attraction of the educational use of philosophy seems to lie in the claim that it can help children and young people to develop skills for thinking critically, reflectively and reasonably. By locating the acquisition of such skills within communities of enquiry, the further claim (...)
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  • Critical Thinking Beyond Skill.Marianna Papastephanou & Charoula Angeli - 2007 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 39 (6):604–621.
    The aim of this article is to investigate possibilities for conceptions of critical thinking beyond the established educational framework that emphasizes skills. Distancing ourselves from the older rationalist framework, we explain that what we think wrong with the skills perspective is, amongst other things, its absolutization of performativity and outcomes. In reviewing the relevant discourse, we accept that it is possible for the skills paradigm to be change?friendly and context?sensitive but we argue that it is oblivious to other, non?purposive kinds (...)
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  • Kinds of Thinking, Styles of Reasoning.Michael A. Peters - 2007 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 39 (4):350–363.
    There is no more central issue to education than thinking and reasoning. Certainly, such an emphasis chimes with the rationalist and cognitive deep structure of the Western educational tradition. The contemporary tendency reinforced by cognitive science is to treat thinking ahistorically and aculturally as though physiology, brain structure and human evolution are all there is to say about thinking that is worthwhile or educationally significant. The movement of critical thinking also tends to treat thinking ahistorically, focusing on universal processes of (...)
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  • In Just What Sense Should I Be Critical? An Exploration Into the Notion of 'Assumption'and Some Implications for Assessment.Andrés Mejía - 2009 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 28 (4):351-367.
  • On the Art of Being Wrong: An Essay on the Dialectic of Errors.Sverre Wide - 2009 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 43 (4):573-588.
    This essay attempts to distinguish and discuss the importance and limitations of different ways of being wrong. At first it is argued that strictly falsifiable knowledge is concerned with simple (instrumental) mistakes only, and thus is incapable of understanding more complex errors (and truths). In order to gain a deeper understanding of mistakes (and to understand a deeper kind of mistake), it is argued that communicative aspects have to be taken into account. This is done in the theory of communicative (...)
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  • On the Art of Being Wrong: An Essay on the Dialectic of Errors.Sverre Wide - 2009 - Philosophy of Education 43 (4):573-588.
    This essay attempts to distinguish and discuss the importance and limitations of different ways of being wrong. At first it is argued that strictly falsifiable knowledge is concerned with simple mistakes only, and thus is incapable of understanding more complex errors. In order to gain a deeper understanding of mistakes, it is argued that communicative aspects have to be taken into account. This is done in the theory of communicative action, which adds to our knowledge of errors the notion of (...)
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  • Three Naive Questions: Addressed to the Modern Educational Optimism.Predrag Krstić - 2016 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 35 (2):129-144.
    This paper aims to question anew the popular and supposedly self-evident affirmation of education, in its modern incarnation as in its historical notion. The “naive” questions suggest that we have recently taken for granted that education ought to be for the masses, that it ought to be upbringing, and that it is better than ignorance. Drawing on the tradition that calls such an understanding of education into question, the author shows that the hidden costs of disregarding such reflection end up, (...)
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  • The Inner Violence of Reason: Re‐Reading Heidegger Via Education.Vasco D'Agnese - 2015 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 49 (3):435-455.
    Since Plato, Western thought has framed knowing as a method within ‘some realm of what is’ and a predetermined ‘sphere of objects’. The roots and the consequences of this stance towards reason and truth were noted by Heidegger, who equates the history of Western thought with the history of metaphysics. Since Plato, truth has relied on definition, hierarchy and mastery. Discourse on the truth begins to be discourse on the limits of things and, thus, on who is able to set (...)
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  • Witnessing Deconstruction in Education: Why Quasi-Transcendentalism Matters.Gert Biesta - 2009 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 43 (3):391-404.
    Deconstruction is often depicted as a method of critical analysis aimed at exposing unquestioned metaphysical assumptions and internal contradictions in philosophical and literary language. Starting from Derrida's contention that deconstruction is not a method and cannot be transformed into one, I make a case for a different attitude towards deconstruction, to which I refer as 'witnessing'. I argue that what needs to be witnessed is the occurrence of deconstruction and, more specifically, the occurrence of metaphysics-in-deconstruction. The point of witnessing metaphysics-in-deconstruction (...)
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  • Kinds of Thinking, Styles of Reasoning.Michael A. Peters - 2007 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 39 (4):350-363.
    There is no more central issue to education than thinking and reasoning. Certainly, such an emphasis chimes with the rationalist and cognitive deep structure of the Western educational tradition. The contemporary tendency reinforced by cognitive science is to treat thinking ahistorically and aculturally as though physiology, brain structure and human evolution are all there is to say about thinking that is worthwhile or educationally significant. The movement of critical thinking also tends to treat thinking ahistorically, focusing on universal processes of (...)
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  • Challenging the Limits of Critique in Education Through Morin’s Paradigm of Complexity.Michel Alhadeff-Jones - 2010 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 29 (5):477-490.
  • In Just What Sense Should I Be Critical? An Exploration Into the Notion of ‘Assumption’ and Some Implications for Assessment.Andrés Mejía D. - 2009 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 28 (4):351-367.
  • Pedagogy Without a Project: Arendt and Derrida on Teaching, Responsibility and Revolution.Anne O’Byrne - 2005 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 24 (5):389-409.
  • In Excess of Epistemology: Siegel, Taylor, Heidegger and the Conditions of Thought.Emma Williams - 2015 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 49 (1):142-160.
    Harvey Siegel's epistemologically-informed conception of critical thinking is one of the most influential accounts of critical thinking around today. In this article, I seek to open up an account of critical thinking that goes beyond the one defended by Siegel. I do this by re-reading an opposing view, which Siegel himself rejects as leaving epistemology ‘pretty much as it is’. This is the view proposed by Charles Taylor in his paper ‘Overcoming Epistemology’. Crucially, my aim here is not to defend (...)
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  • Peirce on Educational Beliefs.Torill Strand - 2005 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 24 (3-4):255-276.