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  1. Putting Philosophy to the Service of Schools to Give Children’s Voices Real Value.Sonia París Albert - 2018 - Childhood and Philosophy 14 (30):453-470.
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  • The Philosophy for Children Curriculum: Resisting ‘Teacher Proof’ Texts and the Formation of the Ideal Philosopher Child.Karin Murris - 2016 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 35 (1):63-78.
    The philosophy for children curriculum was specially written by Matthew Lipman and colleagues for the teaching of philosophy by non-philosophically educated teachers from foundation phase to further education colleges. In this article I argue that such a curriculum is neither a necessary, not a sufficient condition for the teaching of philosophical thinking. The philosophical knowledge and pedagogical tact of the teacher remains salient, in that the open-ended and unpredictable nature of philosophical enquiry demands of teachers to think in the moment (...)
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  • Philosophy in Primary Schools?John White - 2012 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 46 (3):449-460.
    The article is a critical discussion of the aims behind the teaching of philosophy in British primary schools. It begins by reviewing the recent Special Issue of the Journal of Philosophy of Education Vol 45 Issue 2 2011 on ‘Philosophy for Children in Transition’, so as to see what light this might throw on the topic just mentioned. The result is patchy; many, but not all, of the papers in the Special Issue deal with issues far removed from the classroom. (...)
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  • Philosophy for Children as an Educational Practice.Riku Välitalo, Hannu Juuso & Ari Sutinen - 2016 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 35 (1):79-92.
    During the past 40 years, the Philosophy for Children movement has developed a dialogical framework for education that has inspired people both inside and outside academia. This article concentrates on analysing the historical development in general and then taking a more rigorous look at the recent discourse of the movement. The analysis proceeds by examining the changes between the so-called first and second generation, which suggests that Philosophy for Children is adapting to a postmodern world by challenging the humanistic ideas (...)
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  • Attitudes Toward Education: Kenneth Burke and New Rhetoric.Kris Rutten & Ronald Soetaert - 2015 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 34 (4):339-347.
    In this article we introduce the special issue Attitudes Toward Education: Kenneth Burke and New Rhetoric, which brings together a number of contributions that were first presented at the conference Rhetoric as Equipment for Living. Kenneth Burke, Culture and Education. Kenneth Burke [1897–1993] is one of the foundational figures in the development of what is known as the ‘new rhetoric’. The aim of the contributions to this special issue is to explore what is pedagogical about Burke’s anthropological account of rhetoric (...)
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  • ‘Not-Being-at-Home’: Subject, Freedom and Transcending in Heideggerian Educational Philosophy.Vasco D’Agnese - 2018 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 37 (3):287-300.
    In my paper, by drawing on the writings Heidegger developed in the late 1920s, I wish to display what we may refer to as the thorough educational nature of Heideggerian reflection. It is my argument that the analysis of Dasein we find in the early Heidegger displays an extraordinary deep and dense reflection on selfhood and subjectivity, a reflection that is rooted in subject’s freedom and transcending. By paying attention to the interplay between these two features, I argue that in (...)
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  • Experimentation in Institutions: Ethics, Creativity, and Existential Competence.Aislinn O’Donnell - 2018 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 37 (1):31-46.
    The existential, experiential, ethical, pathic and pre-pathic dimensions of education are essential for the creative composition of subjectivities in institutional spaces, yet educational research and policy tend increasingly to privilege technical discourses and prescriptive approaches both when evaluating ‘what is effective in education’ and when determining educational policy. This essay explores those aspects of the educational experience and educational institutions that are often felt and sensed pre-cognitively by students, parents and teachers, but are seldom given further elaboration or articulation in (...)
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  • Thinking-in-Concert.Aislinn O'Donnell - 2012 - Ethics and Education 7 (3):261-275.
    In this essay, I examine the concept of thinking in Hannah Arendt's writings. Arendt's interest in the experience of thinking allowed her to develop a concept of thinking that is distinct from other forms of mental activity such as cognition and problem solving. For her, thinking is an unending, unpredictable and destructive activity without fixed outcomes. Her understanding of thinking is distinguished from other approaches to thinking that equate it with, for example, problem solving or knowledge. Examples of a?problem-solving?, skills-based (...)
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  • Chasing Heideggerian Circles: Freedom, Call, and Our Educational Ground.Vasco D’Agnese - 2017 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 49 (10):946-956.
    Over the last couple of decades, Heideggerian philosophy has become an important resource for educationalists. A growing body of literature has demonstrated its educational potential, thus illumining pivotal educational features and phenomena. Whereas my research is situated in the critical space opened by this literature, I adopt a slightly different perspective: in this paper, I discuss what we may refer to as the thoroughly educational nature of Heideggerian philosophy. I contend that Heideggerian thought is not only anchored by questions and (...)
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  • ‘To Give an Example is a Complex Act’: Agamben’s Pedagogy of the Paradigm.Jacob Meskin & Harvey Shapiro - 2014 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 46 (4):1-20.
    Agamben’s notion of the ‘paradigm’ has far-reaching implications for educational thinking, curriculum design and pedagogical conduct. In his approach, examples—or paradigms—deeply engage our powers of analogy, enabling us to discern previously unseen affinities among singular objects by stepping outside established systems of classification. In this way we come to envision novel groupings, new patterns of connection—that nonetheless do not simply reassemble those singular objects into yet another rigidly fixed set or class. Agamben sees this sort of ‘paradigmatic understanding’ as our (...)
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  • Psycho-Politicising Educational Subjectivity: A Posthumanist Consideration of Rancière and Lacan.Sajad Kabgani, Richard Niesche & Kalervo N. Gulson - 2017 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (13):1259-1270.
    Drawing on the aesthetic theory of Jacques Rancière and the Lacanian conception of lack, this paper offers an intervention into the notion of subjectivity which can be applied in critical studies of education. Critiquing the progressive and knowledge-oriented ideology of neoliberal systems, Rancière depicts a world in which politics turns out to delimit the subject’s perceptual experience and in this way, argues that what remains out of this ideological demarcation is susceptible to a challenge of the social order on which (...)
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  • Intentionality and Thinking as ‘Hearing’. A Response to Biesta’s Agenda.Vasco D’Agnese - 2016 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 48 (3).
    In his 2012 article Philosophy of Education for the Public Good: Five Challenges and an Agenda, Gert Biesta identifies five substantial issues about the future of education and the work required to address these issues. This article employs a Heideggerian reading of education to evaluate ‘Biesta’s truth’. I argue that Biesta’s point of view underestimates knowledge’s predominance and relativism; frames intentionality in pre-Heideggerian terms, which—although not a problem in itself because an individual is free to choose a particular perspective on (...)
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  • Facing Paradox Everyday: A Heideggerian Approach to the Ethics of Teaching.Vasco D’Agnese - 2016 - Ethics and Education 11 (2):159-174.
    In this paper, I wish to offer insight into the role of paradox in teaching. I will do so by analyzing teachers’ everyday work, taking a qualitative approach and constructing a small-scale empirical study. Philosophically, my attempt is framed by Heidegger’s thought. Drawing from research data, I argue the following: paradoxes and dilemmas are the very basis of teaching, and a teacher cannot see paradoxes and dilemmas if she/he has already made an choice of disengagement from the profession. Stated otherwise, (...)
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  • Philosophy Across the Curriculum and the Question of Teacher Capacity; Or, What Is Philosophy and Who Can Teach It?Lauren Bialystok - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 51 (4):817-836.
    Pre-college philosophy has proliferated greatly over the last few decades, including in the form of ‘philosophy across the curriculum’. However, there has been very little sustained examination of the nature of philosophy as a subject relative to other standard pre-college subjects and the kinds of expertise an effective philosophy teacher at this level should possess. At face value, the minimal academic preparation expected for competence in secondary philosophy instruction, compared to the high standards for teaching other subjects, raises questions and (...)
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  • Can Deweyan Pragmatist Aesthetics Provide a Robust Framework for the Philosophy for Children Programme?Sevket Benhur Oral - 2013 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 32 (4):361-377.