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  1. Consciousness From a First-Person Perspective.Max Velmans - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):702-726.
    This paper replies to the first 36 commentaries on my target article on “Is human information processing conscious?” (Behavioral and Brain Sciences,1991, pp.651-669). The target article focused largely on experimental studies of how consciousness relates to human information processing, tracing their relation from input through to output, while discussion of the implications of the findings both for cognitive psychology and philosophy of mind was relatively brief. The commentaries reversed this emphasis, and so, correspondingly, did the reply. The sequence of topics (...)
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  • Consciousness: Limited but Consequential.Timothy D. Wilson - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):701-701.
  • No Conscious or Co-Conscious?Graham F. Wagstaff - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):700-700.
  • Consciousness May Still Have a Processing Role to Play.Robert Van Gulick - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):699-700.
  • Attention is Necessary for Word Integration.Geoffrey Underwood - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):698-698.
  • Damn! There Goes That Ghost Again!Keith E. Stanovich - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):696-698.
  • Dissociating Consciousness From Cognition.David Spiegel - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):695-696.
  • Developing Concepts of Consciousness.Aaron Sloman - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):694-695.
  • A Lawful First-Person Psychology Involving a Causal Consciousness: A Psychoanalytic Solution.Howard Shevrin - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):693-694.
  • Isn't the First-Person Perspective a Bad Third-Person Perspective?W. Schaeken & G. D'Ydewalle - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):692-693.
  • A Limitation of the Reflex-Arc Approach to Consciousness.J. Steven Reznick & Philip David Zelazo - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):692-692.
  • Reasons for Doubting the Existence of Even Epiphenomenal Consciousness.Georges Rey - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):691-692.
  • Epi-Arguments for Epiphenomenalism.Bruce Mangan - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):689-690.
  • The Processing of Information is Not Conscious, but its Products Often Are.George Mandler - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):688-689.
  • Consciousness is King of the Neuronal Processors.William A. MacKay - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):687-688.
  • Consciousness: Only Introspective Hindsight?Dan Lloyd - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):686-687.
  • Conscious Functions and Brain Processes.Benjamin Libet - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):685-686.
  • Understanding Awareness at the Neuronal Level.Christof Koch & Francis Crick - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):683-685.
  • Is Consciousness Information Processing?Raymond Klein - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):683-683.
  • Velmans's Overfocused Perspective on Consciousness.Marcel Kinsbourne - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):682-683.
  • Consciousness, Analogy and Creativity.Mark T. Keane - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):682-682.
  • Limits of Preconscious Processing.Albrecht Werner Inhoff - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):680-681.
  • Epiphenomenalism and the Reduction of Experience.Valerie Gray Hardcastle - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):680-680.
  • Has Consciousness a Sharp Edge?Robert A. M. Gregson - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):679-680.
  • What is the Relation Between Language and Consciousness?Jeffrey A. Gray - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):679-679.
  • Memory with and Without Recollective Experience.John M. Gardiner - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):678-679.
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  • Dream Processing.David Foulkes - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):678-678.
  • Observing Protocol.Judith Economos - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):677-677.
  • Conscious Acts and Their Objects.Fred Dretske - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):676-677.
  • Hydrocephalus and “Misapplied Competence”: Awkward Evidence for or Against?N. F. Dixon - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):675-676.
  • On the Premature Demise of Causal Functions for Consciousness in Human Information Processing.Dale Dagenbach - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):675-675.
  • Consciousness and Making Choices.Raymond S. Corteen - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):674-674.
  • Consciousness and Content in Learning: Missing or Misconceived?Richard A. Carlson - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):673-674.
  • Conscious Influences in Everyday Life and Cognitive Research.Kenneth S. Bowers - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):672-673.
  • Evidence Against Epiphenomenalism.Ned Block - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):670-672.
  • A Curious Coincidence? Consciousness as an Object of Scientific Scrutiny Fits Our Personal Experience Remarkably Well.Bernard J. Baars - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):669-670.
  • Is Human Information Processing Conscious?Max Velmans - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):651-69.
    Investigations of the function of consciousness in human information processing have focused mainly on two questions: (1) where does consciousness enter into the information processing sequence and (2) how does conscious processing differ from preconscious and unconscious processing. Input analysis is thought to be initially "preconscious," "pre-attentive," fast, involuntary, and automatic. This is followed by "conscious," "focal-attentive" analysis which is relatively slow, voluntary, and flexible. It is thought that simple, familiar stimuli can be identified preconsciously, but conscious processing is needed (...)
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  • The Roles of Scene Priming and Location Priming in Object-Scene Consistency Effects.Nils Heise & Ulrich Ansorge - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
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  • Visual Routines.Shimon Ullman - 1984 - Cognition 18 (1-3):97-159.
  • Perceptual Tuning and Conscious Attention: Systems of Input Regulation in Visual Information Processing.Thomas H. Carr & Verne R. Bacharach - 1976 - Cognition 4 (3):281-302.
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  • The Relative Importance of Local and Global Structures in Music Perception.Barbara Tillmann & Emmanuel Bigand - 2004 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 62 (2):211–222.
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  • The Effect of Consistency on Short-Term Memory for Scenes.Mingliang Gong, Yuming Xuan, Xinwen Xu & Xiaolan Fu - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
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  • Walk This Way: Approaching Bodies Can Influence the Processing of Faces.Karin S. Pilz, Quoc C. Vuong, Heinrich H. Bülthoff & Ian M. Thornton - 2011 - Cognition 118 (1):17-31.
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  • Contextual Determinants of Visual Recognition with Verbal and Nonverbal Stimuli.Timothy A. Salthouse & John J. Sterling - 1978 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 11 (2):89-92.
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  • Preference for Signaled or Unsignaled Shock in Goldfish.Caroline Fisher & Pietro Badia - 1975 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 6 (2):195-197.
  • Iconic Memory for the Gist of Natural Scenes.Jason Clarke & Arien Mack - 2014 - Consciousness and Cognition 30:256-265.
  • Scene Congruency Biases Binocular Rivalry.Liad Mudrik, Leon Y. Deouell & Dominique Lamy - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (3):756-767.
    Contextual regularities, that is, objects’ tendency to appear with certain other objects, facilitate the processing of visual scenes and confer contextually incongruent objects with a special attentional status. This study was aimed at investigating the mechanisms underlying this attentional advantage using Binocular Rivalry . In two experiments, congruent and incongruent images were pitted against each other, yielding a version of BR in which two objects rival within a given scene. Incongruent objects predominated in awareness longer than congruent ones. This effect (...)
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