Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. The Gender Perspective in Nursing Research: A Theoretical Treasure Chest or a ‘Thorn’ in the Side?Pia Vuolanto & Anne Laiho - 2017 - Minerva 55 (3):371-390.
    This article contributes to the current discussion on interdisciplinarity in the health research field. It focuses on the relationship between nursing research and gender research. Nursing research is a ‘health sciences’ field which draws from the social sciences, the humanities, and biomedicine. Previous research shows the difficulties that social scientists face in their efforts to integrate with biomedical scientists. The aim of this article is to analyse nursing researchers’ views about one potential collaboration partner in the social sciences and humanities: (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Delegation and Supervision of Healthcare Assistants’ Work in the Daily Management of Uncertainty and the Unexpected in Clinical Practice: Invisible Learning Among Newly Qualified Nurses.Helen T. Allan, Carin Magnusson, Karen Evans, Elaine Ball, Sue Westwood, Kathy Curtis, Khim Horton & Martin Johnson - 2016 - Nursing Inquiry 23 (4):377-385.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Values in Nursing Students and Professionals.F. Rosa Jiménez-López, Jesus Gil Roales-Nieto, Guillermo Vallejo Seco & Juan Preciado - 2016 - Nursing Ethics 23 (1):79-91.
  • Technologically-Mediated Nursing Care: The Impact on Moral Agency.Sheila O'Keefe-McCarthy - 2009 - Nursing Ethics 16 (6):786-796.
    Technology is pervasive and overwhelming in the intensive care setting. It has the power to inform and direct the nursing care of critically ill patients. Technology changes the moral and social dynamics within nurse—patient encounters. Nurses use technology as the main reference point to interpret and evaluate clinical patient outcomes. This shapes nurses’ understanding and the kind of care provided. Technology inserts itself between patients and nurses, thus distancing nurses from patients. This situates nurses into positions of power, granting them (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • What Should Other Healthcare Professions Learn From Nursing Ethics.Soren Holm - 2006 - Nursing Philosophy 7 (3):165-174.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • Self‐Sacrifice, Self‐Transcendence and Nurses' Professional Self.Elizabeth J. Pask - 2005 - Nursing Philosophy 6 (4):247-254.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Comment.Pam Smith & Maria Lorentzon - 2005 - Nursing Ethics 12 (6):638-642.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Compassion and Responsibility in Surgical Care.Kirsti Torjuul, Ingunn Elstad & Venke Sørlie - 2007 - Nursing Ethics 14 (4):522-534.
    Ten nurses at a university hospital in Norway were interviewed as part of a comprehensive investigation into the narratives of nurses and physicians about being in ethically difficult situations in surgical units. The transcribed interview texts were subjected to a phenomenological-hermeneutic interpretation. The main theme in the narratives was being close to and moved by the suffering of patients and relatives. The nurses' responsibility for patients and relatives was expressed as a commitment to act, and they needed to ask themselves (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Ethical Challenges in Pain Management Post-Surgery.Nahid Rejeh, Fazlollah Ahmadi, Eesa Mohamadi, Moniereh Anoosheh & Anooshirvan Kazemnejad - 2009 - Nursing Ethics 16 (2):161-172.
    This qualitative study describes ethical challenges faced by Iranian nurses in the process of pain management in surgical units. To address this issue, semistructured interviews were conducted with 26 nurses working in surgery units in three large university hospitals in Tehran. An analysis of the transcripts revealed three main categories: institutional limitations; nurses' proximity to and involvement with pain and suffering; and nurses' fallibility. Specific themes identified within the categories were: insufficient resources, medical hierarchy; difficulties with believing patients' complaints regarding (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Between the Patient and the Next of Kin in End-of-Life Care.Ramvi Ellen & Ueland Venke Irene - forthcoming - Nursing Ethics:096973301668893.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark