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David Bloor (1982). Durkheim and Mauss Revisited: Classification and the Sociology of Knowledge.

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  1.  11
    Realism 'Naturalized'? [REVIEW]Georg Theiner - 2016 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 47 (1):247-255.
    The notion of 'natural kinds' has been central to contemporary discussions of metaphysics and philosophy of science. In recent years, essentialism has been the dominant account of natural kinds among philosophers, but the essentialist view has encountered resistance. Informed by detailed examination of classification in the natural and social sciences, Prof. Muhammad Ali Khalidi argues against essentialism and for a naturalist account of natural kinds. By looking at case studies drawn from diverse scientific disciplines, from fluid mechanics to virology and (...)
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  2.  30
    Friends at Last? Distributed Cognition and the Cognitive/Social Divide.Adam Toon - 2014 - Philosophical Psychology 27 (1):1-14.
    Distributed cognition (d-cog) claims that many cognitive processes are distributed across groups and the surrounding material and cultural environment. Recently, Nancy Nersessian, Ronald Giere, and others have suggested that a d-cog approach might allow us to bring together cognitive and social theories of science. I explore this idea by focusing on the specific interpretation of d-cog found in Edwin Hutchins' canonical text Cognition in the wild. First, I examine the scope of a d-cog approach to science, showing that there are (...)
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  3.  1
    Science Inside Law: The Making of a New Patent Class in the International Patent Classification.Hyo Yoon Kang - 2012 - Science in Context 25 (4):551-594.
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  4. On Some Uses and Abuses of Topology in the Social Analysis of Technology.N. Marres - 2012 - Theory, Culture and Society 29 (4-5):288-310.
    This paper examines the limits and possibilities of topological approaches in the social analysis of technology. It proposes that topology should be considered not just as a theory to be adopted, but equally as a device that is deployed in social life in a variety of ways. Digital technologies help to make clear why: these technologies have facilitated the spread of a topological imagination, but they have also enabled a weak form of topological imagination, one that leaves in place deterministic (...)
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  5.  31
    But is It Sociology of Knowledge? Wilhelm Jerusalem's “Sociology of Cognition” in Context.Thomas Uebel - 2012 - Studies in East European Thought 64 (1-2):5-37.
    This paper considers the charge that—contrary to the current widespread assumption accompanying the near-universal neglect of his work—Wilhelm Jerusalem (1854–1923) cannot count as one of the founders of the sociology of (scientific) knowledge. In order to elucidate the matter, Jerusalem’s “sociology of cognition” is here reconstructed in the context of his own work in psychology and philosophy as well as in the context of the work of some predecessors and contemporaries. It is argued that while it shows clear discontinuities with (...)
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  6.  36
    Where Do Classifications Come From? The DSM-III, the Transformation of American Psychiatry, and the Problem of Origins in the Sociology of Knowledge.Michael Strand - 2011 - Theory and Society 40 (3):273-313.
  7. Durkheim, Wittgenstein and the Norms of Thought.R. Keucheyan - 2010 - Diogenes 57 (4):63-72.
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  8.  29
    The "Strong Programme", Normativity, and Social Causes.Chris Calvert-Minor - 2008 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 38 (1):1–22.
    Barry Barnes and David Bloor of the Strong Programme of the sociology of knowledge advance a naturalized epistemology that reduces all accounts of normativity to social causes. I endorse their program of naturalizing one kind of normativity, but I argue that there is another kind they cannot naturalize. Within the context of sociological explanations of rationality, there are norms of rationality instantiated by scientists that Barnes and Bloor study, and Barnes and Bloor's own normative ascriptions of scientists as rational beings. (...)
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  9. Realism, Reliabilism, and the 'Strong Programme' in the Sociology of Scientific Knowledge.Jeff Kochan - 2008 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 22 (1):21 – 38.
    In this essay, I respond to Tim Lewens's proposal that realists and Strong Programme theorists can find common ground in reliabilism. I agree with Lewens, but point to difficulties in his argument. Chief among these is his assumption that reliabilism is incompatible with the Strong Programme's principle of symmetry. I argue that the two are, in fact, compatible, and that Lewens misses this fact because he wrongly supposes that reliabilism entails naturalism. The Strong Programme can fully accommodate a reliabilism which (...)
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  10.  51
    Ideals and Monisms: Recent Criticisms of the Strong Programme in the Sociology of Knowledge.David Bloor - 2007 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 38 (1):210-234.
    I offer a reply to criticisms of the Strong Programme presented by Stephen Kemp who develops some new lines of argument that focus on the ‘monism’ of the programme. He says the programme should be rejected for three reasons. First, because it embodies ‘weak idealism’, that is, its supporters effectively sever the link between language and the world. Second, it challenges the reasons that scientists offer in explanation of their own beliefs. Third, it destroys the distinction between successful and unsuccessful (...)
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  11.  24
    Rethinking the “Strong Programme” in the Sociology of Knowledge.Adrian Haddock - 2004 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 35 (1):19-40.
    It is widely believed that the “strong programme” in the sociology of knowledge comes into serious conflict with mainstream epistemology. I argue that the programme has two aspects—one modest, and the other less so. The programme’s modest aspect—best represented by the “symmetry thesis”—does not contain anything to threaten much of the epistemological mainstream, but does come into conflict with a certain kind of epistemological “externalism”. The immodest aspect, however—in the form of “finitism”—pushes the programme towards a radical form of relativism (...)
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  12.  56
    Metaphysical Deja Vu: Hacking and Latour on Science Studies and Metaphysics - the Social Construction of What? Ian Hacking; Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Mass. And London, England, 1999, Pp. X+261, Price £18.50 Hardback, ISBN 0-674-81200-X.Pandora's Hope: Essays on the Reality of Science Studies Bruno Latour; Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Mass. And London, England, 1999, Pp. X+324, Price £12.50, $19.95 Paperback, ISBN 0-67-465336-X, £27.95, $45.00 Hardback, ISBN 0-67-465335-. [REVIEW]M. Kusch - 2002 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 33 (3):639-647.
    Ian Hacking, Hacking and Latour on science studies and metaphysics: The Social Construction of What?Harvard University Press, ISBN 0-674-81200-X Bruno Latour, Pandora's Hope: Essays on the Reality of Science StudiesHarvard University Press, ISBN0-67-465336-X.
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  13.  13
    A Mannheim for All Seasons: Bloor, Merton, and the Roots of the Sociology of Scientific Knowledge.David Kaiser - 1998 - Science in Context 11 (1).
  14.  26
    The Sociophilosophy of Folk Psychology.M. Kusch - 1997 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 28 (1):1-25.
  15.  2
    The Sociophilosophy of Folk Psychology.Martin Kusch - 1997 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 28 (1):1-25.
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  16.  10
    Critical Discussion.David B. Resnik - 1993 - Erkenntnis 38 (2):261 - 271.
    InExplaining Science: A Cognitive Approach, Ronald Giere (1988), proposes what he calls a cognitive theory of science (p. 2). Giere intends his view to be a broadly scientific account employing the resources of the cognitive sciences (Giere, 1988, p. 2). This paper argues that Giere does not secure a firm foundation for a cognitive theory of science because he leaves the door wide open for social constructivist interpretations of his views. In order to avoid social constructivism, Giere needs to adopt (...)
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  17. The Role of the Natural World in the Theory Choice of Scientists.K. -M. Kim - 1992 - Social Science Information 31 (3):445-464.
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  18.  12
    Looking for Those Natural Numbers: Dimensionless Constants and the Idea of Natural Measurement.Philip Mirowski - 1992 - Science in Context 5 (1).
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  19.  22
    Prospective Realism.Harold I. Brown - 1990 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 21 (2):211-242.
  20.  5
    Can Relativism Be Reconciled with Realism and Causalism?Barbara Tuchańska - 1990 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 4 (3):285-294.
    Abstract This paper deals with two fundamental assumptions of the Strong programme in the sociology of knowledge and the theoretical (im) possibility of their co?existence with the general relativist tendency of this programme. The first assumption is the realist thesis introduced into the Strong programme through the materialist presupposition that sense experience is reliable and humans are able to learn about the regularities of the non?social world in order to survive. The second assumption is the causal principle. Arguments developed in (...)
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  21.  22
    Against Epistemological Relativism.Frans Gregersen & Simo Køppe - 1988 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 19 (4):447-487.
  22.  60
    Modeling the Gender Politics in Science.Elizabeth Potter - 1988 - Hypatia 3 (1):19-33.
    Feminist science scholars need models of science that allow feminist accounts, not only of the inception and reception of scientific theories, but of their content as well. I argue that a "Network Model," properly modified, makes clear theoretically how race, sex and class considerations can influence the content of scientific theories. The adoption of the "corpuscular philosophy" by Robert Boyle and other Puritan scientists during the English Civil War offers us a good case on which to test such a model. (...)
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  23.  14
    Shall I Compare Thee to a Minkowski-Ricardo-Leontief-Metzler Matrix of the Mosak-Hicks Type?: Or, Rhetoric, Mathematics, and the Nature of Neoclassical Economic Theory.Philip Mirowski - 1987 - Economics and Philosophy 3 (1):67.
    Is rhetoric just a new and trendy way to épater les bourgeois? Unfortunately, I think that the newfound interest of some economists in rhetoric, and particularly Donald McCloskey in his new book and subsequent responses to critics, gives that impression. After economists have worked so hard for the past five decades to learn their sums, differential calculus, real analysis, and topology, it is a fair bet that one could easily hector them about their woeful ignorance of the conjugation of Latin (...)
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  24.  13
    Primitive Classification and the Sociology of Knowledge: A Response to Bloor.Joseph Wayne Smith - 1984 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 15 (3):237-243.