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  • Identifying Attributes of Food System Sustainability: Emerging Themes and Consensus.Jared Stoltzfus, Angela Xiong, Farryl Bertmann, Christopher Wharton, John Connors & Hallie Eakin - 2017 - Agriculture and Human Values 34 (3):757-773.
    Achieving food system sustainability is one of the more pressing challenges of this century. Over the last decades, experts from diverse disciplines and intellectual traditions have worked to document the critical threats to food system sustainability and to define an appropriate agenda for action. Nevertheless, these efforts have tended to focus selectively on only a few components of the food system or have tended to be framed in particular discourses. Depending on the point of departure, what aspects of the food (...)
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  • Stacking Functions: Identifying Motivational Frames Guiding Urban Agriculture Organizations and Businesses in the United States and Canada.Nathan McClintock & Michael Simpson - 2018 - Agriculture and Human Values 35 (1):19-39.
    While a growing body of scholarship identifies urban agriculture’s broad suite of benefits and drivers, it remains unclear how motivations to engage in urban agriculture interrelate or how they differ across cities and types of organizations. In this paper, we draw on survey responses collected from more than 250 UA organizations and businesses from 84 cities across the United States and Canada. Synthesizing the results of our quantitative analysis of responses, qualitative analysis of textual data excerpted from open-ended responses, and (...)
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  • Putting Food Access in its Topological Place: Thinking in Terms of Relational Becomings When Mapping Space.Michael Carolan - 2020 - Agriculture and Human Values 38 (1):243-256.
    This paper adopts a relational, also known as a topological, approach to food accessibility—the idea that food spaces are best understood as relational becomings rather than as voids filled exclusively with mass and address. It is animated by an experimental spirit, in terms of the methods employed, the data collected, and by how those data are brought together, which together better enriches inductive theorizing. The project looks at the daily macro-mobilities—trips from one GPS coordinate to another—of 70 Coloradoans, triangulated with (...)
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  • Unearthing the Entangled Roots of Urban Agriculture.Jonathan K. London, Bethany B. Cutts, Kirsten Schwarz, Li Schmidt & Mary L. Cadenasso - 2021 - Agriculture and Human Values 38 (1):205-220.
    This study examines urban agriculture in Sacramento, California, the nation's self-branded “Farm-to-Fork Capital,” in order to highlight UA’s distinct yet entangled roots. The study is based on 24 interviews with a diverse array of UA leaders, conducted as part of a five-year transdisciplinary study of UA in Sacramento. In it, we unearth three primary “taproots” of UA projects, each with its own historical legacies, normative visions, and racial dynamics. In particular, we examine UA projects with “justice taproots,” “health taproots,” and (...)
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  • Analysis of the Consumer’s Perception of Urban Food Products From a Soilless System in Rooftop Greenhouses: A Case Study From the Mediterranean Area of Barcelona.Mireia Ercilla-Montserrat, David Sanjuan-Delmás, Esther Sanyé-Mengual, Laura Calvet-Mir, Karla Banderas, Joan Rieradevall & Xavier Gabarrell - 2019 - Agriculture and Human Values 36 (3):375-393.
    Soilless crops are commonly used in rooftop agriculture because they easily adapt to building constraints. However, acceptance of the produce derived from this system may be controversial. This paper evaluates consumers’ acceptance of food from RA in Mediterranean cities, focusing on the quality of the product, production system, and consumers’ motivations. We surveyed 238 respondents on the UAB university campus as potential consumers. The survey was distributed via an Internet-link that was provided along with a sample of tomatoes from RA. (...)
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  • Fresh Food, New Faces: Community Gardening as Ecological Gentrification in St. Louis, Missouri.Taylor Harris Braswell - 2018 - Agriculture and Human Values 35 (4):809-822.
    A largely qualitative body of literature has contributed to understanding the contradictory dimensions of community gardening as a social justice tool. Building on this literature through a city-wide, quantitative intervention, this paper focuses on community gardening as a facilitator of ecological gentrification in St. Louis, Missouri. Combining the analytical lenses of spatial justice, urban political ecology, and the rent gap theory of gentrification, I deploy spatial regression analysis to show that community gardening was positively associated with gentrification in St. Louis (...)
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  • Resolving Differing Stakeholder Perceptions of Urban Rooftop Farming in Mediterranean Cities: Promoting Food Production as a Driver for Innovative Forms of Urban Agriculture.Esther Sanyé-Mengual, Isabelle Anguelovski, Jordi Oliver-Solà, Juan Ignacio Montero & Joan Rieradevall - 2016 - Agriculture and Human Values 33 (1):101-120.
    Urban agriculture is spreading within the Global North, largely for food production, ranging from household individual gardens to community gardens that boost neighborhood regeneration. Additionally, UA is also being integrated into buildings, such as urban rooftop farming. Some URF experiences succeed in North America both as private and community initiatives. To date, little attention has been paid to how stakeholders perceive UA and URF in the Mediterranean or to the role of food production in these initiatives. This study examines the (...)
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  • Whose Right to the City? Race and Food Justice Activism in Post-Katrina New Orleans.Catarina Passidomo - 2014 - Agriculture and Human Values 31 (3):385-396.
    Among critical responses to the perceived perils of the industrial food system, the food sovereignty movement offers a vision of radical transformation by demanding the democratic right of peoples “to define their own agriculture and food policies.” At least conceptually, the movement offers a visionary and holistic response to challenges related to human and environmental health and to social and economic well-being. What is still unclear, however, is the extent to which food sovereignty discourses and activism interact with and affect (...)
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  • Urban Agriculture of the Future: An Overview of Sustainability Aspects of Food Production in and on Buildings. [REVIEW]Kathrin Specht, Rosemarie Siebert, Ina Hartmann, Ulf B. Freisinger, Magdalena Sawicka, Armin Werner, Susanne Thomaier, Dietrich Henckel, Heike Walk & Axel Dierich - 2014 - Agriculture and Human Values 31 (1):33-51.
    Innovative forms of green urban architecture aim to combine food, production, and design to produce food on a larger scale in and on buildings in urban areas. It includes rooftop gardens, rooftop greenhouses, indoor farms, and other building-related forms. This study uses the framework of sustainability to understand the role of ZFarming in future urban food production and to review the major benefits and limitations. The results are based on an analysis of 96 documents published in accessible international resources. The (...)
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  • Farm to School in British Columbia: Mobilizing Food Literacy for Food Sovereignty.Lisa Jordan Powell & Hannah Wittman - 2018 - Agriculture and Human Values 35 (1):193-206.
    Farm to school programs have been positioned as interventions that can support goals of the global food sovereignty movement, including strengthening local food production systems, improving food access and food justice for urban populations, and reducing distancing between producers and consumers. However, there has been little assessment of how and to what extent farm to school programs can actually function as a mechanism leading to the achievement of food sovereignty. As implemented in North America, farm to school programs encompass activities (...)
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  • Perception and Acceptance of Agricultural Production in and on Urban Buildings : A Qualitative Study From Berlin, Germany.Kathrin Specht, Rosemarie Siebert & Susanne Thomaier - 2016 - Agriculture and Human Values 33 (4):753-769.
    Rooftop gardens, rooftop greenhouses and indoor farms have been established or planned by activists and private companies in Berlin. These projects promise to produce a range of goods that could have positive impacts on the urban setting but also carry a number of risks and uncertainties. In this early innovation phase, the relevant stakeholders’ perceptions and social acceptance of ZFarming represent important preconditions for success or failure of the further diffusion of this practice. We used the framework of acceptance to (...)
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  • Contributing to Food Security in Urban Areas: Differences Between Urban Agriculture and Peri-Urban Agriculture in the Global North.Ina Opitz, Regine Berges, Annette Piorr & Thomas Krikser - 2016 - Agriculture and Human Values 33 (4):341-358.
    Food security is becoming an increasingly relevant topic in the Global North, especially in urban areas. Because such areas do not always have good access to nutritionally adequate food, the question of how to supply them is an urgent priority in order to maintain a healthy population. Urban and peri-urban agriculture, as sources of local fresh food, could play an important role. Whereas some scholars do not differentiate between peri-urban and urban agriculture, seeing them as a single entity, our hypothesis (...)
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