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John Boardman & K. J. Dover (1980). Greek Homosexuality.

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  1.  11
    A New Natural Law Account of Sexuate Selfhood and Rape's Harm.Joshua D. Goldstein & Robin Blake - 2015 - Heythrop Journal 56 (5):734-750.
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  2. Tyrannized Souls: Plato's Depiction of the ‘Tyrannical Man’.Mark A. Johnstone - 2015 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 23 (3):423-437.
    In book 9 of Plato's Republic, Socrates describes the nature and origins of the ‘tyrannical man’, whose soul is said to be ‘like’ a tyrannical city. In this paper, I examine the nature of the ‘government’ that exists within the tyrannical man's soul. I begin by demonstrating the inadequacy of three potentially attractive views sometimes found in the literature on Plato: the view that the tyrannical man's soul is ruled by his ‘lawless’ unnecessary appetites, the view that it is ruled (...)
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  3.  8
    Peers on Socrates and Plato.Jim Mackenzie - 2014 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 46 (7):1-14.
  4.  14
    Freud, Plato and Irigaray: A Morpho‐Logic of Teaching and Learning.Chris Peers - 2012 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (7):760-774.
    This article discusses two well-known texts that respectively describe learning and teaching, drawn from the work of Freud and Plato. These texts are considered in psychoanalytic terms using a methodology drawn from the philosophy of Luce Irigaray. In particular the article addresses Irigaray's approach to the analysis of speech and utterance as a ‘cohesion between the source of the utterance and the utterance itself’ (Hass, 2000). I apply this approach to ask whether educational tradition has fractured the relationship between pedagogy (...)
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  5. The Symposium and Platonic Ethics: Plato, Vlastos, and a Misguided Debate.Frisbee Sheffield - 2012 - Phronesis 57 (2):117-141.
    Abstract Scholarship on the Symposium is dominated by a debate on interpersonal love started by Gregory Vlastos in his article, `The Individual as an Object of Love in Plato.' This paper argues that this debate is a misguided one, because it is not reflective of the central concerns of this text. Attention needs to be turned to the broader ethical questions posed about the ends of life, the nature of human happiness, and contemplation. Failure to do so will mean that (...)
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  6.  19
    Narrative Reflection in the Philosophy of Teaching: Genealogies and Portraits.Hunter Mcewan - 2011 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 45 (1):125-140.
    How has philosophical reflection contributed to the ways that we think about teaching? In this paper I explore two forms of narrative reflection on teaching—genealogies and portraits. Genealogies tell a story about the origins of teaching; portraits find expression in myths and other narrative forms. I explore two genealogies of teaching—one deriving from the sophist, Protagoras, in which teaching is viewed as a technical skill employing methods of instruction; the other, deriving from Plato, in which teaching is seen fundamentally in (...)
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  7.  38
    Basic Emotions in Social Relationships, Reasoning, and Psychological Illnesses.Keith Oatley & Philip N. Johnson-Laird - 2011 - Emotion Review 3 (4):424-433.
    The communicative theory of emotions postulates that emotions are communications both within the brain and between individuals. Basic emotions owe their evolutionary origins to social mammals, and they enable human beings to use repertoires of mental resources appropriate to recurring and distinctive kinds of events. These emotions also enable them to cooperate with other individuals, to compete with them, and to disengage from them. The human system of emotions has also grafted onto basic emotions propositional contents about the cause of (...)
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  8.  3
    Aristophanes'Adôniazousai.L. Reitzammer - 2008 - Classical Antiquity 27 (2):282-333.
    A scholiast's note on Lysistrata mentions that there was an alternative title to the play: Adôniazousai. A close reading of the play with this title in mind reveals that Lysistrata and her allies metaphorically hold an Adonis festival atop the Acropolis. The Adonia, a festival that is typically regarded as “marginal” and “private” by modern scholars, thus becomes symbolically central and public as the sex-strike held by the women halts the Peloponnesian war. The public space of the Acropolis becomes, notionally, (...)
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  9.  19
    Greek Exercises: The Modern Olympics as Hellenic Appropriation and Reinvention.Louis A. Ruprecht - 2008 - Thesis Eleven 93 (1):72-87.
    `From Aristotle to Us', the conference held at La Trobe University in May 2007, names a powerful and highly influential Romantic trajectory, one which posits a particular conception of the ancients, a particular conception of the moderns, and a complex conception of the relationship between the two. Using the modern Olympic Revival as a case study and a case in point, this article argues that such `exercises' in Greek appropriation always operate with largely unstated assumptions about the nature of the (...)
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  10.  10
    Gender, Class and Ideology: The Social Function of Virgin Sacrifice in Euripides' Children of Herakles.David Kawalko Roselli - 2007 - Classical Antiquity 26 (1):81-169.
    This paper explores how gender can operate as a disguise for class in an examination of the self-sacrifice of the Maiden in Euripides' Children of Herakles. In Part I, I discuss the role of human sacrifice in terms of its radical potential to transform society and the role of class struggle in Athens. In Part II, I argue that the representation of women was intimately connected with the social and political life of the polis. In a discussion of iconography, the (...)
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  11.  15
    Review Essay: Mr. Smith Does Not Go to Washington.Bart Schultz - 2007 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 37 (3):366-386.
    A recent spate of books on the life and legacy of the political philosopher Leo Strauss, notably Steven B. Smith's Reading Leo Strauss: Politics, Philosophy, and Judaism , suggests a desperate effort to salvage Strauss and the Straussian school of political philosophy from the wreckage of American neoconservatism. Although a number of these works are quite thoughtful and helpfully counter many of the more extreme (and uglier) charges made concerning the meaning of Straussianism and its political influence, their general drift (...)
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  12.  56
    Diotima and Demeter as Mystagogues in Plato's.Nancy Evans - 2006 - Hypatia 21 (2):1 - 27.
    : Like the goddess Demeter, Diotima from Mantineia, the prophetess who teaches Socrates about eros and the "rites of love" in Plato's Symposium, was a mystagogue who initiated individuals into her mysteries, mediating to humans esoteric knowledge of the divine. The dialogue, including Diotima's speech, contains religious and mystical language, some of which specifically evokes the female-centered yearly celebrations of Demeter at Eleusis. In this essay, I contextualize the worship of Demeter within the larger system of classical Athenian practices, and (...)
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  13.  8
    Diotima and Demeter as Mystagogues in Plato's Symposium.Nancy Evans - 2006 - Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy 21 (2):1-27.
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  14.  18
    The Androgynous and Bisexuality in Ancient Legal Codes.E. Cantarella - 2005 - Diogenes 52 (4):5-14.
    The word 'bisexuality', unknown to the ancients, is used here in two senses to indicate an individual with male and female sex organs or who copulates with people of both sexes. The phenomenon of bisexuality is then analysed with reference to the Greek myth of Hermaphrodite, a 'bisexual' being, born of a nymph's love for a young man of divine descent: in the guise of a fable, the myth recounts the birth of a 'monster', who raises a question-mark over the (...)
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  15.  21
    Slaves of Dionysos: Satyrs, Audience, and the Ends of theOresteia.Mark Griffith - 2002 - Classical Antiquity 21 (2):195-258.
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  16.  44
    Mixed Pleasures, Blended Discourses: Poetry, Medicine, and the Body in Plato'sPhilebus46-47c.Anastasia-Erasmia Peponi - 2002 - Classical Antiquity 21 (1):135-160.
    In Plato's Philebus the last section of the discussion on the falseness of pleasure is dedicated to those pleasures intrinsically mixed with pain. This paper focuses specifically on bodily mixed pleasures, an analysis that extends from 44d to 47c, while its focal point is 46-47c. By adopting the anti-hedonists' methodology, Socrates cunningly transforms his entire analysis of bodily mixed pleasures into a discourse on human disease, in which medical terminology prevails. Two major points are made in the reading suggested here. (...)
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  17.  7
    Private and Public: Links BetweenSymposionandSyssitionin Fifth-Century Athens.Ann Steiner - 2002 - Classical Antiquity 21 (2):347-390.
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  18.  14
    Reviving Greco‐Roman Friendship: A Bibliographical Review.Heather Devere - 1999 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 2 (4):149-187.
  19.  2
    Eurymedon and the Evolution of Political Personifications in the Early Classical Period.Amy C. Smith - 1999 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 119:128-141.
  20.  47
    Sexual Orientation, Gender, and Families: Dichotomizing Differences.Susan Moller Okin - 1996 - Hypatia 11 (1):30 - 48.
    Throughout history, women and men have been seen as "opposites" in various respects. Examples from the writings of political theorists illustrate this point, while Virginia Woolf is shown to have departed radically from the general tendency to dichotomize sexual difference. Further, this "need" to dichotomize sexual differences contributes to anxiety about and stigmatization of homosexuality. As the social salience of gender becomes reduced, it is to be expected that hostility to homosexuality will decline.
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  21.  9
    Love and Marriage in Greek New Comedy.P. G. McC Brown - 1993 - Classical Quarterly 43 (01):189-.
    Writing of Terence's Andria in 1952, Duckworth said: ‘In the Andria the second love affair is unusual; Charinus’ love for a respectable girl whose virtue is still intact has been considered an anticipation of a more modern attitude towards love and sex. More frequently in Plautus and Terence the heroine, if of respectable parentage, has been violated before the opening of the drama , or she is a foreigner, a courtesan, or a slave girl' , p. 158). Perhaps in 1993 (...)
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  22.  9
    Phylogenetic Fallacies and Sexual Oppression.Mildred Dickemann - 1992 - Human Nature 3 (1):71-87.
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  23.  13
    The Introduction of Athletic Nudity: Thucydides, Plato, and the Vases.Myles McDonnell - 1991 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 111:182-.
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  24.  1
    Rethinking Male and Female: The Pre-Hellenic Philosophy of Mortal Opinion.Andrea Nye - 1988 - History of European Ideas 9 (3):261-280.
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  25.  41
    The Hidden Host: Irigaray and Diotima at Plato's Symposium.Andrea Nye - 1988 - Hypatia 3 (3):45 - 61.
    Irigaray's reading of Plato's Symposium in Ethique de la difference sexuelle illustrates both the advantages and the limits of her textual practise. Irigaray's attentive listening to the text allows Diotima's voice to emerge from an overlay of Platonic scholarship. But both the ahistorical nature of that listening and Irigaray's assumption of feminine marginality also make her a party to Plato's sabotage of Diotima's philosophy. Understood in historical context, Diotima is not an anomaly in Platonic discourse, but the hidden host of (...)
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  26.  4
    The Hidden Host: Irigaray and Diotima at Plato's Symposium.Andrea Nye - 1988 - Hypatia 3 (3):45-61.
    Irigaray's reading of Plato's Symposium in Ethique de la difference sexuelle illustrates both the advantages and the limits of her textual practise. Irigaray's attentive listening to the text allows Diotima's voice to emerge from an overlay of Platonic scholarship. But both the ahistorical nature of that listening and Irigaray's assumption of feminine marginality also make her a party to Plato's sabotage of Diotima's philosophy. Understood in historical context, Diotima is not an anomaly in Platonic discourse, but the hidden host of (...)
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