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  1. El aprendizaje de los rasgos fonopragmáticos del enfado en español como lengua extranjera.Beatriz Carbajal-Carrera, Diana Martínez Hernández & Dania Ramos Martín - 2020 - Logos: Revista de Lingüística, Filosofía y Literatura 30 (2):393-411.
    Identificar la expresión de enfado en una lengua extranjera y reproducirla con adecuación y precisión son destrezas cuya relevancia y falta de propuestas satisfactorias han sido señaladas por las investigaciones sobre la enseñanza de emociones. Este trabajo combina la identificación de carencias en la didáctica de la entonación emocional con el análisis de muestras espontáneas de enfado como base de unas pautas didácticas para introducir la enseñanza contextualizada de la expresión de enfado en español. A través de muestras de un (...)
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  • Emotions in Tweets: From Instantaneity to Preconstruction.Georgeta Cislaru - 2015 - Social Science Information 54 (4):455-469.
    This article deals with the expression of emotions in tweets. The aim is to observe the way users formulate their feelings in a technologically constrained yet expressively free communicative environment, in a context of written instantaneity which leaves place for the selection of context-adapted linguistic formulae. Comparison between emotional expressions involved in hashtags and the emotional lexicon used in the body of the messages shows some topical discrepancies and, more particularly, different degrees of denotational power. It also reveals a constructivist (...)
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  • My Emotions Belong Here and There: Extending the Phenomenon of Emotional Acculturation to Heritage Culture Fit.Jozefien De Leersnyder, Heejung S. Kim & Batja Mesquita - 2020 - Tandf: Cognition and Emotion 34 (8):1573-1590.
    Volume 34, Issue 8, December 2020, Page 1573-1590.
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  • Psychological Construction: The Darwinian Approach to the Science of Emotion.Lisa Feldman Barrett - 2013 - Emotion Review 5 (4):379-389.
    Psychological construction constitutes a different paradigm for the scientific study of emotion when compared to the current paradigm that is inspired by faculty psychology. This new paradigm is more consistent with the post-Darwinian conceptual framework in biology that includes a focus on (a) population thinking (vs. typologies), (b) domain-general core systems (vs. physical essences), and (c) constructive analysis (vs. reductionism). Three psychological construction approaches (the OCC model, the iterative reprocessing model, and the conceptual act theory) are discussed with respect to (...)
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  • Emotions in Context: A Sociodynamic Model of Emotions.B. Mesquita & M. Boiger - 2014 - Emotion Review 6 (4):298-302.
    We propose a sociodynamic model of emotions, in which emotions are seen as dynamic systems that emerge from the interactions and relationships in which they take place. Our model does not deny that emotions are biologically constrained, yet it takes seriously that emotions are situated in specific contexts. We conceive emotions as largely functional to the sociocultural environment in which they occur; this is so because sociocultural environments foster the emergence of emotions that positively contribute to social cohesion. The role (...)
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  • Flavors of Appraisal Theories of Emotion.Agnes Moors - 2014 - Emotion Review 6 (4):303-307.
    Appraisal theories of emotion have two fundamental assumptions: that there are regularities to be discovered between situations and components of emotional episodes, and that the influence of these situations on these components is causally mediated by a mental process called appraisal. Appraisal theories come in different flavors, proposing different to-be-explained phenomena and different underlying mechanisms for the influence of appraisal on the other components.
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  • Answering the Call for a Sociological Perspective on the Multilevel Social Construction of Emotion: A Comment on Boiger and Mesquita.Kimberly B. Rogers & Lynn Smith-Lovin - 2012 - Emotion Review 4 (3):232-233.
    Boiger and Mesquita (2012) present a social constructionist perspective on emotion that argues for its multilevel contextualization through social interactions, relationships, and culture. The present comments offer a response to the authors’ call for input from other disciplines. We provide a sociological perspective on emotion construction at each of the contextual levels discussed by Boiger and Mesquita, and discuss a model that can address interdependencies between these levels. Our remarks are intended to identify additional literature that can be brought to (...)
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  • The Future of Social Constructionism: Introduction to a Special Section of Emotion Review.James R. Averill - 2012 - Emotion Review 4 (3):215-220.
    It is easy to envision marked progress in biological and physiological approaches to emotion, due to technological advances in imaging and other recording techniques. The future of social-constructionism appears more hazy: Progress will likely depend as much on new ideas as on new empirical discoveries. The most fruitful breeding ground for new ideas is where disciplines meet. Hence, the contributors to this special section represent diverse disciplines: biology, computer science, and the arts, as well as areas more traditionally associated with (...)
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  • Balancing Emotions Between Constraints and Construction: Comment on Boiger and Mesquita.Gün R. Semin - 2012 - Emotion Review 4 (3):230-231.
    Emotion events are undoubtedly socially constructed and emerge in interactions that take place in relationships; they are dynamic and situated in social-cultural contexts as Boiger and Mesquita (2012) argue. However, such constructions evolve within important limiting conditions set to human functioning. Our understanding of how emotional events are constructed can only be complete by assigning a central role to body, brain, and the social-physical conditions in the construction process, since these are critical constraints to human functioning.
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  • Appraisal in the Emotion System: Coherence in Strategies for Coping.Ira J. Roseman - 2013 - Emotion Review 5 (2):141-149.
    Emotions can be understood as a coherent, integrated system of general-purpose coping strategies, guided by appraisal, for responding to situations of crisis and opportunity (when specific-purpose motivational systems may be less effective). This perspective offers functional explanations for the presence of particular emotions in the emotion repertoire, and their elicitation by particular appraisal combinations. Implications of the Emotion System model for debated issues, such as the dimensional vs. discrete nature of appraisals and emotions, are also discussed.
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  • Dissecting the Sociality of Emotion: A Multilevel Approach.K. B. Rogers, T. Schroder & C. von Scheve - 2014 - Emotion Review 6 (2):124-133.
    In recent years, scholars have come to understand emotions as dynamic and socially constructed—the product of interdependent cultural, relational, situational, and biological influences. While researchers have called for a multilevel theory of emotion construction, any progress toward such a theory must overcome the fragmentation of relevant research across various disciplines and theoretical frameworks. We present affect control theory as a launching point for cross-disciplinary collaboration because of its empirically grounded conceptualization of social mechanisms operating at the interaction, relationship, and cultural (...)
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  • Comment: Constructionism is a Multilevel Framework for Affective Science.K. A. Lindquist & J. K. MacCormack - 2014 - Emotion Review 6 (2):134-135.
    We point out that constructionist models from experimental psychology account for the sociocultural, psychological, and neural levels of analysis in emotion. Individual constructionist models form a “metamodel” that integrates the levels of analysis important to a science of emotion. By clarifying the multilevel nature of constructionism, we hope to help lay a strong foundation for future cross-disciplinary collaborations.
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  • Emotion Science Needs to Account for the Social World.Michael Boiger & Batja Mesquita - 2012 - Emotion Review 4 (3):236-237.
    Emotions are complex processes that are constrained by biology, but not fully explained without taking into account the social context in which they develop. Mapping these contexts, and understanding how and under which conditions they shape emotions, is an essential task for the science of emotions; a task that—at least in psychology—has been neglected. The three commentaries each offer some interesting reflections on exactly this task.
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  • Emotional Interdependence and Well-Being in Close Relationships.Laura Sels, Eva Ceulemans, Kirsten Bulteel & Peter Kuppens - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  • Understanding Culture Clashes and Catalyzing Change: A Culture Cycle Approach.Mar Yam G. Hamedani & Hazel Rose Markus - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
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  • How Leaders’ Psychological Capital Influence Their Followers’ Psychological Capital: Social Exchange or Emotional Contagion.Qishan Chen, Yurou Kong, Jun Niu, Wenyang Gao, Jieying Li & Miaosi Li - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
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  • The Effects of Culture and Context on Perceptions of Robotic Facial Expressions.Casey C. Bennett & Selma Šabanović - 2015 - Interaction Studies. Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies / Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies 16 (2):272-302.
    We report two experimental studies of human perceptions of robotic facial expressions while systematically varying context effects and the cultural background of subjects. Except for Fear, East Asian and Western subjects were not significantly different in recognition rates, and, while Westerners were better at judging affect from mouth movement alone, East Asians were not any better at judging affect based on eye/brow movement alone. Moreover, context effects appeared capable of over-riding such cultural differences, most notably for Fear. The results seem (...)
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  • A Higher-Order Theory of Emotional Consciousness.Richard Brown & Joseph LeDoux - 2017 - Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America.
    Emotional states of consciousness, or what are typically called emotional feelings, are traditionally viewed as being innately programed in subcortical areas of the brain, and are often treated as different from cognitive states of consciousness, such as those related to the perception of external stimuli. We argue that conscious experiences, regardless of their content, arise from one system in the brain. On this view, what differs in emotional and non-emotional states is the kind of inputs that are processed by a (...)
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  • The Effects of Culture and Context on Perceptions of Robotic Facial Expressions.Casey C. Bennett & Selma Šabanović - 2015 - Interaction Studies 16 (2):272-302.
    We report two experimental studies of human perceptions of robotic facial expressions while systematically varying context effects and the cultural background of subjects. Except for Fear, East Asian and Western subjects were not significantly different in recognition rates, and, while Westerners were better at judging affect from mouth movement alone, East Asians were not any better at judging affect based on eye/brow movement alone. Moreover, context effects appeared capable of over-riding such cultural differences, most notably for Fear. The results seem (...)
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  • The Effects of Culture and Context on Perceptions of Robotic Facial Expressions.Casey C. Bennett & Selma Šabanović - 2015 - Interaction Studiesinteraction Studies Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systems 16 (2):272-302.
    We report two experimental studies of human perceptions of robotic facial expressions while systematically varying context effects and the cultural background of subjects. Except for Fear, East Asian and Western subjects were not significantly different in recognition rates, and, while Westerners were better at judging affect from mouth movement alone, East Asians were not any better at judging affect based on eye/brow movement alone. Moreover, context effects appeared capable of over-riding such cultural differences, most notably for Fear. The results seem (...)
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  • Perceived Social Pressure Not to Experience Negative Emotion is Linked to Selective Attention for Negative Information.Brock Bastian, Madeline Lee Pe & Peter Kuppens - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (2).
  • Cognitive Approaches to Emotions.Keith Oatley & P. N. Johnson-Laird - 2014 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 18 (3):134-140.
  • Three Decades of Cognition & Emotion: A Brief Review of Past Highlights and Future Prospects.Klaus Rothermund & Sander L. Koole - 2018 - Cognition and Emotion 32 (1):1-12.