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  1. Gender Equity and Corporate Social Responsibility in a Post-Feminist Era.Lindsay J. Thompson - 2008 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 17 (1):87–106.
  • European and American Perspectives on Corporate Social Responsibility.Robert Phillips - 2008 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 17 (1):69-73.
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  • Editorial Introduction: Interpreting Ethical Polyphony.David Bevan & Laura Hartman - 2008 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 17 (1):64–68.
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  • European Perspectives on Business Ethics: A Polyphonic Challenge.Laura P. Hartman David Bevan - 2007 - Business and Society Review 112 (4):471-476.
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  • Envisioning a Democratic Culture of Difference: Feminist Ethics and the Politics of Dissent in Social Movements.Sheena J. Vachhani - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 164 (4):745-757.
    Using two contemporary cases of the global #MeToo movement and UK-based collective Sisters Uncut, this paper argues that a more in-depth and critical concern with gendered difference is necessary for understanding radical democratic ethics, one that advances and develops current understandings of business ethics. It draws on practices of social activism and dissent through the context of Irigaray’s later writing on democratic politics and Ziarek’s analysis of dissensus and democracy that proceeds from an emphasis on alterity as the capacity to (...)
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  • The Bodies of the Commons: Towards a Relational Embodied Ethics of the Commons.Emmanouela Mandalaki & Marianna Fotaki - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 166 (4):745-760.
    This article extends current theorizations of the ethics of the commons by drawing on feminist thought to propose a relational embodied ethics of the commons. Departing from abstract ethical principles, the proposed ethical theory reconsiders commoning as a process emerging through social actors’ embodied interactions, resulting in the development of an ethics that accounts for their shared corporeal concerns. Such theorizing allows for inclusive alternative forms of organizing, while offering the ethical and political possibility of countering forms of economic competition (...)
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  • CSR as Gendered Neocoloniality in the Global South.Banu Ozkazanc-Pan - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 160 (4):851-864.
    Corporate social responsibility has generally been recognized as corporate pro-social behavior aimed at remediating social issues external to organizations, while political CSR has acknowledged the political nature of such activity beyond social aims. Despite the growth of this literature, there is still little attention given to gender as the starting point for a conversation on CSR, ethics, and the Global South. Deploying critical insights from feminist work in postcolonial traditions, I outline how MNCs replicate gendered neocolonialist discourses and perpetuate exploitative (...)
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  • Building Projects on the Local Communities’ Planet: Studying Organizations’ Care-Giving Approaches.Roya Derakhshan - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-20.
    This study examines local communities’ lived experiences and organizations’ care-giving processes regarding four oil and gas projects deployed in three countries. Analyzing the empirical data through the lens of ethics of care reveals that, together with mature justice, the inclination to care conceived at the focal organization creates an ethical culture encouraging caring activities by individuals at the local level. Through close communications with communities, project decision makers at the local level recognize the demanded care of local communities and develop (...)
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  • Mitigating Stakeholder Marginalisation with the Relational Self.Krista Bondy & Aurelie Charles - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 165 (1):67-82.
    Stakeholder theory has been an incredibly powerful tool for understanding and improving organisations, and their relationship with other actors in society. That these critical ideas are now accepted within mainstream business is due in no small part to the influence of stakeholder theory. However, improvements to stakeholder engagement through stakeholder theory have tended to help stakeholders who are already somewhat powerful within organisational settings, while those who are less powerful continue to be marginalised and routinely ignored. In this paper, we (...)
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  • Feminist Ethics and Women Leaders: From Difference to Intercorporeality.Alison Pullen & Sheena J. Vachhani - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-11.
    This paper problematises the ways women’s leadership has been understood in relation to male leadership rather than on its own terms. Focusing specifically on ethical leadership, we challenge and politicise the symbolic status of women in leadership by considering the practice of New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern. In so doing, we demonstrate how leadership ethics based on feminised ideals such as care and empathy are problematic in their typecasting of women as being simply the other to men. We apply (...)
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  • “Daring to Care”: Challenging Corporate Environmentalism.Mary Phillips - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 156 (4):1151-1164.
    Corporate engagements with pressing environmental challenges focus on expanding the role of the market, seeking opportunities for growth and developing technologies to manage better environmental resources. Such approaches have proved ineffective. I suggest that a lack of meaningful response to ecological degradation and climate change is inevitable within a capitalist system underpinned by a logics of appropriation and an instrumental rationality that views the planet as a means to achieve economic ends. For ecofeminism, these logics are promulgated through sets of (...)
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  • Frontiers, Intersections and Engagements of Ethics and HRM.Gavin Jack, Michelle Greenwood & Jan Schapper - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 111 (1):1-12.
    This essay, and the special issue it introduces, sets out to reignite ethical interrogations of the theory and practice of Human Resource Management (HRM). To cultivate greater levels of boundary-spanning debate about the ethics of HRM, we develop a framework of four tenors for scholarly work: the ethical-declarative, the ethical-subjunctive, the ethical-ethnographic, the ethical-systemic. Each of these tenors denotes particular grounds for ethical critique and encourages scholars to consider the subjects and objects of their enquiry, the disciplinary scope of their (...)
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  • Entrepreneurial Feminists: Perspectives About Opportunity Recognition and Governance. [REVIEW]Barbara Orser, Catherine Elliott & Joanne Leck - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 115 (2):241-257.
    Interviews were conducted with 15 entrepreneurial feminists to explore how feminist values are enacted in opportunity recognition and organizational structures within the venture-creation process. Results suggest that opportunity recognition aligned with the needs and values of the entrepreneurial feminists. Opportunity construction was defined as ‘I am the market’, ‘building community with women like me’, ‘enabling others’, ‘do more with my life’, and ‘opportunity knocked’. Organizational structures and governance reflected cooperative, collaborative and ethical principles. Implications to feminist theory are discussed.
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  • When Harm is at Stake: Ethical Value Orientation, Managerial Decisions, and Relational Outcomes.Amy Klemm Verbos & Janice S. Miller - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 127 (1):149-163.
    Relational dimensions of ethical decision making are a potentially interesting focus to enrich our understanding of decision-making processes. This study examines decision preferences and reactions to decisions in a situation of possible harm. Two ethical value orientations, just value orientation and relational value orientation , are introduced. Participants chose relational cooperation, instrumental cooperation, or independence in dealing with an uncertain situation of possible harm. JVO contributes to a decision of relational cooperation. Only RVO was related to expected mutual benefit and (...)
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  • Corporate Social Responsibility and Women’s Entrepreneurship: Towards a More Adequate Theory of “Work”.Mary Johnstone-Louis - 2017 - Business Ethics Quarterly 27 (4):569-602.
    ABSTRACT:Programs aimed at increasing women’s entrepreneurship are a rapidly proliferating class of CSR initiatives across the globe with participation by many of the world’s largest corporations. The gendered nature of this phenomenon suggests that feminist approaches to CSR may offer a particularly salient mode of their analysis. In this article, I argue that insights from feminist economics regarding the historically prevalent—but narrow and gendered—definition of work, which artificially separates production from reproduction, provide fruitful tools for theory building when conceptualizing gender (...)
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  • A Critical Examination of the AICPA’s New “Conceptual Framework” Ethics Protocol.Albert D. Spalding & Gretchen R. Lawrie - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 155 (4):1135-1152.
    What does it look like when an organization tentatively steps away from an exclusively rules-based regime and begins to attend to both rules and principles? What insights and guidance can ethicists and ethical theory offer? This paper is a case study of an organization that has initiated such a transition. The American Institute of Certified Public Accountants has begun a turn toward the promotion of ethical principles and best practices by adding a “conceptual framework” to its existing Code of Professional (...)
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  • Guest Editors’ Introduction: Gender, Business Ethics, and Corporate Social Responsibility: Assessing and Refocusing a Conversation.Kate Grosser, Jeremy Moon & Julie A. Nelson - 2017 - Business Ethics Quarterly 27 (4):541-567.
    ABSTRACT:This article reviews a conversation between business ethicists and feminist scholars begun in the early 1990s and traces the development of that conversation in relation to feminist theory. A bibliographic analysis of the business ethics and corporate social responsibility literatures over a twenty-five-year period elucidates the degree to which gender has been a salient concern, the methodologies adopted, and the ways in which gender has been analyzed. Identifying significant limitations to the incorporation of feminist theory in these literatures, we discuss (...)
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  • Empowering Women Through Corporate Social Responsibility: A Feminist Foucauldian Critique.Lauren McCarthy - 2017 - Business Ethics Quarterly 27 (4):603-631.
    ABSTRACT:Corporate social responsibility has been hailed as a new means to address gender inequality, particularly by facilitating women’s empowerment. Women are frequently and forcefully positioned as saviours of economies or communities and proponents of sustainability. Using vignettes drawn from a CSR women’s empowerment programme in Ghana, this conceptual article explores unexpected programme outcomes enacted by women managers and farmers. It is argued that a feminist Foucauldian reading of power as relational and productive can help explain this since those involved are (...)
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  • Stakeholder Salience for Small Businesses: A Social Proximity Perspective.Merja Lähdesmäki, Marjo Siltaoja & Laura J. Spence - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 158 (2):373-385.
    This paper advances stakeholder salience theory from the viewpoint of small businesses. It is argued that the stakeholder salience process for small businesses is influenced by their local embeddedness, captured by the idea of social proximity, and characterised by multiple relationships that the owner-manager and stakeholders share beyond the business context. It is further stated that the ethics of care is a valuable ethical lens through which to understand social proximity in small businesses. The contribution of the study conceptualises how (...)
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  • Gender Equity and Corporate Social Responsibility in a Post-Feminist Era.Lindsay J. Thompson - 2008 - Business Ethics: A European Review 17 (1):87-106.
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  • CSR and Feminist Organization Studies: Towards an Integrated Theorization for the Analysis of Gender Issues.Kate Grosser & Jeremy Moon - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 155 (2):321-342.
    Although corporate social responsibility practice increasingly addresses gender issues, and gender and CSR scholarship is expanding, feminist theory is rarely explicitly referenced or discussed in the CSR literature. We contend that this omission is a key limitation of the field. We argue that CSR theorization and research on gender can be improved through more explicit and systematic reference to feminist theories, and particularly those from feminist organization studies. Addressing this gap, we review developments in feminist organization theory, mapping their relevance (...)
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  • European Perspectives on Business Ethics: A Polyphonic Challenge.David Bevan & Laura P. Hartman - 2007 - Business and Society Review 112 (4):471-476.
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  • Editorial Introduction: Interpreting Ethical Polyphony.David Bevan & Laura Hartman - 2008 - Business Ethics: A European Review 17 (1):64-68.
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