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Twilight Zones: The Hidden Life of Cultural Images From Plato to O.J

University of California Press (1999)

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  1. That Many of Us Should Not Parent.Lisa Cassidy - 2001 - Hypatia 21 (4):40-57.
    : In liberal societies (where birth control is generally accepted and available), many people decide whether or not they wish to become parents. One key question in making this decision is, What kind of parent will I be? Parenting competence can be ranked from excellent to competent to poor. Cassidy argues that those who can foresee being poor parents, or even merely competent ones, should opt not to parent.
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  • That Many of Us Should Not Parent.Lisa Cassidy - 2001 - Hypatia 21 (4):40-57.
    In liberal societies , many people decide whether or not they wish to become parents. One key question in making this decision is, What kind of parent will I be? Parenting competence can be ranked from excellent to competent to poor. Cassidy argues that those who can foresee being poor parents, or even merely competent ones, should opt not to parent.
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  • Dis-Appearance and Dys-Appearance Anew: Living with Excess Skin and Intestinal Changes Following Weight Loss Surgery. [REVIEW]Karen Synne Groven, Målfrid Råheim & Gunn Engelsrud - 2013 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (3):507-523.
    The aim of this article is to explore bodily changes following weight loss surgery. Our empirical material is based on individual interviews with 22 Norwegian women. To further analyze their experiences, we build primarily on the phenomenologist Drew Leder`s distinction between bodily dis-appearance and dys-appearance. Additionally, our analysis is inspired by Simone de Beauvoir, Merleau-Ponty and Julia Kristeva. Although these scholars have not directed their attention to obesity operations, they occupy a prime framework for shedding light on different dimensions of (...)
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  • The Neglected Harms of Beauty: Beyond Engaging Individuals.Heather Widdows - 2017 - Journal of Practical Ethics 5 (2):1-29.
    This paper explores the neglected ‘harms-to-others’ which result from increased attention to beauty, increased engagement in beauty practices and rising minimal beauty standards. In the first half of the paper I consider the dominant discourse of beauty harms – that of ethics and policy – and argue that this discourse has over-focused on the agency of, and possible harms to, recipients of beauty practices. I introduce the feminist discourse which recognises a general harm to all women and points towards an (...)
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  • Real Men Do Wear Mascara: Advertising Discourse and Masculine Identity.Claire Harrison - 2008 - Critical Discourse Studies 5 (1):55-74.
    During the past two decades, the traditional concept of masculinity has been challenged by the pervasive spread of metrosexual attitudes and practices through Western cultures. This article examines an extreme aspect of this trend through a multimodal reading of an online advertisement for male mascara. Using social semiotic theory and methodologies based on functional grammars, the analysis reveals that the advertisement's producers are treading a fine line in their verbal and visual discursive choices, trying to create a dialectic that encourages (...)
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  • Vulnerability, Ignorance, and Oppression.Erinn Gilson - 2011 - Hypatia 26 (2):308-332.
    This paper aims to understand the relationship between ignorance and vulnerability by drawing on recent work on the epistemology of ignorance. After elaborating how we might understand the importance of human vulnerability, I develop the claim that ignorance of vulnerability is produced through the pursuit of an ideal of invulnerability that involves both ethical and epistemological closure. The ignorance of vulnerability that is a prerequisite for such invulnerability is, I contend, a pervasive form of ignorance that underlies and grounds other (...)
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  • Strength in Muscle and Beauty in Integrity: Building a Body for Her.Melina Constantine Bell - 2008 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 35 (1):43-62.
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  • Laboring Women, Coaching Men: Masculinity and Childbirth Education in the Contemporary United States.Carine M. Mardorossian - 2003 - Hypatia 18 (3):113-134.
    : Hospitals have adopted a rhetoric of family-centered maternity care, and one of the ways in which they show their commitment to it is through the integration of the husband-as-coach model of childbirth (the Bradley method) into delivery practices. I argue that this model's widespread popularity testifies less to the culture's endorsement of a woman-centered approach than to healthcare's appropriation of "natural" childbirth as a site for the production and reproduction of patriarchal and capitalist power.
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  • Notes on a Nonfoundational Phenomenology of Technology.Robert Rosenberger - 2017 - Foundations of Science 22 (3):471-494.
    The emerging school of thought called “postphenomenology” offers a distinct understanding of the ways that people experience technology usage. This perspective combines insights from the philosophical tradition of phenomenology with commitments to the anti-essentialism and nonfoundationalism of American pragmatism. One of postphenomenology’s central positions is that technologies always remain “multistable,” i.e., subject to different uses and meanings. But I suggest that as this perspective matures, philosophical problems are emerging around the notion of multistability, what I call “the problem of invariance” (...)
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  • The (In) Visible Body: Feminism, Phenomenology, and the Case of Cosmetic Surgery.Luna Dolezal - 2010 - Hypatia 25 (2):357-375.
    This paper will examine the experience of and drive for boaly invisibility in women through the theoretical approaches of phenomenology and social constructionism. An examination of the social disruptions of bodily invisibility and the compulsive avoidance of such instances, particuhrly with respect to the fastidious maintenance of body comportment and appearance within the narrow parameters afforded by social norms, will lead to an exploration of the conflation of biomedicine with the beauty industry.
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  • Laboring Women, Coaching Men: Masculinity and Childbirth Education in the Contemporary United States.Carine M. Mardorossian - 2003 - Hypatia 18 (3):113-132.
    Hospitals have adopted a rhetoric of family-centered maternity care, and one of the ways in which they show their commitment to it is through the integration of the husband-as-coach model of childbirth into delivery practices. I argue that this model's widespread popularity testifies less to the culture's endorsement of a woman-centered approach than to healthcare's appropriation of "natural" childbirth as a site for the production and reproduction of patriarchal and capitalist power.
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  • Fugit Hora: Fashion and the Ethics of Style.Hilary Radner - 1998 - Cultural Values 2 (2-3):340-354.
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