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  1. Values and Further Education.John Halliday - 1996 - British Journal of Educational Studies 44 (1):66-81.
    This paper is a philosophically informed contribution to debate about the values that might inform and be communicated by a further education. It includes a historical review of the concern of colleges of further education with economic and personal development that was reflected in the distinction between vocational and liberal studies. This distinction is seen to arise out of a mistaken epistemology which attempts to distinguish once and for all as it were, objective facts from subjective values. As instrumentalism came (...)
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  • Cooperating in Their Own Deprofessionalisaton? On the Need to Recognise the 'Public' and 'Ecological' Roles of the Teaching Profession.Mike Bottery & Nigel Wright - 1996 - British Journal of Educational Studies 44 (1):82-98.
    This paper argues that two areas vital to the teaching profession's own development and to the development of its standing in society have been neglected in inservice education and training. The first, an understanding and development of the ' public ' dimension of teaching, suggests that teachers have duties and concerns which transcend those of professionals in the private sector because the public domain is a necessary focus for the promotion of collective life as opposed to individual interests. The second, (...)
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  • Learning Moral Commitment in Higher Education?Gerald Collier - 1997 - Journal of Moral Education 26 (1):73-83.
    Abstract Britain is faced with many intractible problems. These call for detailed analysis, but equally also for examination of the values that inform them and the influences that shape those values. The present paper assumes, first, that the most fundamental of the values to be considered are those??such as integrity??which sustain probity in public life; secondly, that it is important to explore in what ways universities are likely to influence students? moral commitments; thirdly, that moral values are properly regarded as (...)
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  • Cooperating in Their Own Deprofessionalisaton? On the Need to Recognise the ‘Public and ‘Ecological’ Roles of the Teaching Profession.Mike Bottery & Nigel Wright - 1996 - British Journal of Educational Studies 44 (1):82-98.
    This paper argues that two areas vital to the teaching profession's own development and to the development of its standing in society have been neglected in inservice education and training. The first, an understanding and development of the 'public' dimension of teaching, suggests that teachers have duties and concerns which transcend those of professionals in the private sector because the public domain is a necessary focus for the promotion of collective life as opposed to individual interests. The second, an appreciation (...)
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  • The Field of Educational Administration in England.Helen M. Gunter - 2012 - British Journal of Educational Studies 60 (4):337-356.
    Based on over twenty years of empirical and intellectual work about knowledge production in the field of educational administration, I examine the origins and development of the canon, methodologies and knowledge workers in England. I focus on the field as being primarily concerned with professional activity and how and why this was established from the 1960s, and the way knowledge workers have variously positioned themselves over time and in context. Using a case study of knowledge production at the time of (...)
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  • Values and Further Education.John Halliday - 1996 - British Journal of Educational Studies 44 (1):66-81.
    This paper is a philosophically informed contribution to debate about the values that might inform and be communicated by a further education. It includes a historical review of the concern of colleges of further education with economic and personal development that was reflected in the distinction between vocational and liberal studies. This distinction is seen to arise out of a mistaken epistemology which attempts to distinguish once and for all as it were, objective facts from subjective values. As instrumentalism came (...)
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