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  1. Corporate Social Responsibility and Women’s Entrepreneurship: Towards a More Adequate Theory of “Work”.Mary Johnstone-Louis - 2017 - Business Ethics Quarterly 27 (4):569-602.
    ABSTRACT:Programs aimed at increasing women’s entrepreneurship are a rapidly proliferating class of CSR initiatives across the globe with participation by many of the world’s largest corporations. The gendered nature of this phenomenon suggests that feminist approaches to CSR may offer a particularly salient mode of their analysis. In this article, I argue that insights from feminist economics regarding the historically prevalent—but narrow and gendered—definition of work, which artificially separates production from reproduction, provide fruitful tools for theory building when conceptualizing gender (...)
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  • Does Having Women Managers Lead to Increased Gender Equality Practices in Corporate Social Responsibility?Izaskun Larrieta-Rubín de Celis, Eva Velasco-Balmaseda, Sara Fernández de Bobadilla, María del Mar Alonso-Almeida & Gurutze Intxaurburu-Clemente - 2015 - Business Ethics: A European Review 24 (1):91-110.
    There is increasing interest in determining what impact having women in management positions may have on corporate social responsibility initiatives. Various authors suggest that gender equality practices should be factored into the broader framework of CSR. This paper examines how the presence of women on corporate boards, in top and middle management and as heads of CSR departments, influences gender equality practices in the field of CSR. Using information collected from companies that have signed up to Women's Empowerment Principles in (...)
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  • Board Diversity and Corporate Social Disclosure: Evidence From Vietnam.Trang Cam Hoang, Indra Abeysekera & Shiguang Ma - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 151 (3):833-852.
    Debates around sound corporate governance propose board diversity as a key attribute to sufficiently challenge executive management for stakeholder engagement. This study contributes to this debate by empirically investigating the effect of board diversity on corporate social disclosure of Vietnamese listed firms. The study finds a significantly positive effect of diversity-in-boards on CSD while diversity-of-boards has no effect on CSD. The results contribute by showing that a single theoretical approach can provide an adequate explanation for board diversity. The study contributes (...)
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  • Board Gender Diversity and Corporate Response to Sustainability Initiatives: Evidence From the Carbon Disclosure Project.Walid Ben-Amar, Millicent Chang & Philip McIlkenny - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 142 (2):369-383.
    This paper investigates the effect of female representation on the board of directors on corporate response to stakeholders’ demands for increased public reporting about climate change-related risks. We rely on the Carbon Disclosure Project as a sustainability initiative supported by institutional investors. Greenhouse gas emissions measurement and its disclosure to investors can be thought of as a first step toward addressing climate change issues and reducing the firm’s carbon footprint. Based on a sample of publicly listed Canadian firms over the (...)
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  • Comprehensive Board Diversity and Quality of Corporate Social Responsibility Disclosure: Evidence From an Emerging Market.Nooraisah Katmon, Zam Zuriyati Mohamad, Norlia Mat Norwani & Omar Al Farooque - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 157 (2):447-481.
    This study empirically examines the relationship between wide-ranging board diversity and the quality of corporate social responsibility disclosure variables in Malaysia. We extend prior literature covering broader dimensions of board diversity and their impact on CSR after controlling for board and audit committee characteristics. Using 200 listed firms in Bursa Malaysia during 2009–2013 and applying both OLS and 2SLS instrumental variables approaches, we document significant positive effect of board education level and board tenure diversity on the quality of CSR disclosure. (...)
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  • Does an Asset Owner’s Institutional Setting Influence Its Decision to Sign the Principles for Responsible Investment?Andreas G. F. Hoepner, Arleta A. A. Majoch & Xiao Y. Zhou - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-26.
    From a simple idea to unite asset owners in their quest for responsible investment at its launch in April 2006, the United Nations supported Principles for Responsible Investment have grown in just one decade into an initiative with more than 1500 fee-paying signatories. Jointly, the PRI’s signatories hold assets worth more than $80 trillion, making it one of the more prevalent not-for-profit organizations worldwide. Furthermore, the PRI’s ambitious mission to transform the financial system at large into a more sustainable one (...)
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  • The Heterogeneity of Board-Level Sustainability Committees and Corporate Social Performance.Udi Hoitash, Rani Hoitash & Jenna Burke - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 154 (4):1161-1186.
    This paper explores an increasingly prevalent element of board-level commitment to sustainability. We propose a theoretical framework under which the existence and associated actions of board-level sustainability committees are motivated by shared value creation, where the interests of a diverse group of stakeholders are satisfied and sufficient profit is achieved. Using hand-collected data, we find that sustainability committees are heterogeneous in focus and vary in their effectiveness. Specifically, we disaggregate the sustainability committee construct based on stakeholder group focus and find (...)
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  • Who Needs CSR? The Impact of Corporate Social Responsibility on National Competitiveness.Ioanna Boulouta & Christos N. Pitelis - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 119 (3):1-16.
    The link between corporate social responsibility (CSR) and competitiveness has been examined mainly at the business level. The purpose of this paper is to improve conceptual understanding and provide empirical evidence on the link between CSR and competitiveness at the national level. We draw on an eclectic-synthetic framework of international economics, strategic management and CSR literatures to explore conceptually whether and how CSR can impact on the competitiveness of nations, and test our hypotheses empirically with a sample of 19 developed (...)
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  • Female Executives and Perceived Employer Attractiveness: On the Potentially Adverse Signal of Having a Female CHRO Rather Than a Female CFO.Anja Iseke & Kerstin Pull - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 156 (4):1113-1133.
    We investigate whether female executives influence perceived employer attractiveness for female job seekers. Drawing on signaling theory, we argue that female members in top management may signal organizational justice and organizational support and may therefore enhance perceived employer attractiveness. Findings from a scenario experiment with 357 participants indicate that female job seekers are more attracted to an organization with a female executive holding a non-stereotypical office [such as Chief Financial Officer ] as compared to an organization with an all-male top (...)
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  • The Potential Use of Sociological Perspectives for Business Ethics Teaching.Johannes Brinkmann - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 156 (1):273-287.
    This paper investigates the potential contribution of sociological perspectives for business ethics teaching. After a brief and selective literature review, the paper suggests starting with sociological thinking and three aspects of it: sociological concepts, sociological imagination, and postponed judgment. After presenting two short case teaching stories and three sociological concepts or frameworks, the potential inspiration value of a sociological checklist for analysing or diagnosing business ethics cases is tried out. As an open ending, some short final suggestions are made for (...)
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  • Empowering Women: The Role of Emancipative Forces in Board Gender Diversity.Steven A. Brieger, Claude Francoeur, Christian Welzel & Walid Ben-Amar - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 155 (2):495-511.
    This study investigates the effect of country-level emancipative forces on corporate gender diversity around the world. Based on Welzel’s theory of emancipation, we develop an emancipatory framework of board gender diversity that explains how action resources, emancipative values and civic entitlements enable, motivate and encourage women to take leadership roles on corporate boards. Using a sample of 6390 firms operating in 30 countries around the world, our results show positive single and combined effects of the framework components on board gender (...)
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  • To What Extent Do Gender Diverse Boards Enhance Corporate Social Performance?Claude Francoeur, Réal Labelle, Souha Balti & Saloua E. L. Bouzaidi - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 155 (2):343-357.
    The inconclusiveness of previous research on the association between gender diverse boards and corporate social performance has led us to revisit the question in light of stakeholder management and institutional theories. Given that corporate social responsibility is a multidimensional concept, we test the influence of GDB on various groups of stakeholders. By considering the interaction between stakeholders’ power and directors’ personal motivations toward the prioritization of stakeholders’ claims, we find that GDB are positively related to CSR dimensions that are related (...)
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  • From Board Composition to Corporate Environmental Performance Through Sustainability-Themed Alliances.Corinne Post, Noushi Rahman & Cathleen McQuillen - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 130 (2):423-435.
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  • The Influence of Presence and Position of Women on the Boards of Directors: The Case of NHS Foundation Trusts.Javier Garcia-Lacalle & Sheila Ellwood - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 130 (1):69-84.
    This study examines the influence of women on the boards of directors of National Health Service Foundation Trusts in England. FTs provide a public service where social performance is the primary objective, although financial constraints must be met. Female presence is higher for executive directors than non-executives, reflecting the high number of women employed in the sector. We find that a high female presence among executive and non-executive directorships does not result in significant differences either in financial return or service (...)
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  • Does Confucianism Reduce Board Gender Diversity? Firm-Level Evidence From China.Xingqiang Du - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 136 (2):399-436.
    This study extends previous literature on the association between Confucianism and corporate decisions by examining Confucianism’s influence on board gender diversity. Using a sample of Chinese listed firms during the period of 2001–2011 and geographic-proximity-based Confucianism variables, I provide strong and consistent evidence to show that Confucianism is significantly negatively associated with board gender diversity, suggesting that the proportion of women directors in the boardroom is significantly lower for firms surrounded by strong Confucianism atmosphere than for firms located in regions (...)
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  • The Association Between Gender-Diverse Compensation Committees and CEO Compensation.Martin Bugeja, Zoltan Matolcsy & Helen Spiropoulos - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 139 (2):375-390.
    We examine the association between gender-diverse compensation committees and CEO pay and find that CEO compensation levels are negatively associated with gender-diversity of the compensation committee, but not gender-diversity of the board. Furthermore, we find that excess CEO compensation is negatively related to subsequent return on assets for firms with an all-male compensation committee but not for firms with a gender-diverse compensation committee. These results suggest that CEOs do receive some level of excess compensation which can be mitigated by having (...)
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  • The Influence of Board Diversity, Board Diversity Policies and Practices, and Board Inclusion Behaviors on Nonprofit Governance Practices.Kathleen Buse, Ruth Sessler Bernstein & Diana Bilimoria - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 133 (1):179-191.
    This study examines how and when nonprofit board performance is impacted by board diversity. Specifically, we investigate board diversity policies and practices as well as board inclusion behaviors as mediating mechanisms for the influence of age, gender, and racial/ethnic diversity of the board on effective board governance practices. The empirical analysis, using a sample of 1,456 nonprofit board chief executive officers, finds that board governance practices are directly influenced by the gender and racial diversity of the board and that board (...)
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  • Exploring the Relationship Between Board Characteristics and CSR: Empirical Evidence From Korea.Young Kyun Chang, Won-Yong Oh, Jee Hyun Park & Myoung Gyun Jang - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 140 (2):225-242.
    Previous studies in Western contexts have examined the relationships between various board characteristics and CSR, yet the relationships need to be re-examined in non-Western contexts given differential theoretical premises across contexts. We specifically propose that the effects of board characteristics on CSR in Korea should be patterned distinctively from Western-based existing literature, focusing on three important board characteristics, such as a board’s independence, social ties, and diversity. Using a panel dataset from large Korean firms, we found that various relationships between (...)
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  • Board Composition and Corporate Social Responsibility: The Role of Diversity, Gender, Strategy and Decision Making.Kathyayini Rao & Carol Tilt - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 138 (2):327-347.
    This paper aims to critically review the existing literature on the relationship between corporate governance, in particular board diversity, and both corporate social responsibility and corporate social responsibility reporting and to suggest some important avenues for future research in this field. Assuming that both CSR and CSRR are outcomes of boards’ decisions, this paper proposes that examining boards’ decision making processes with regard to CSR would provide more insight into the link between board diversity and CSR. Particularly, the paper stresses (...)
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