Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Prosociality in Business: A Human Empowerment Framework.Steven A. Brieger, Siri A. Terjesen, Diana M. Hechavarría & Christian Welzel - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 159 (2):361-380.
    This study introduces a human empowerment framework to better understand why some businesses are more socially oriented than others in their policies and activities. Building on Welzel’s theory of emancipation, we argue that human empowerment—comprised of four components: action resources, emancipative values, social movement activity, and civic entitlements—enables, motivates, and entitles individuals to pursue social goals for their businesses. Using a sample of over 15,000 entrepreneurs from 43 countries, we report strong empirical evidence for two ecological effects of the framework (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • I Will Do It If I Enjoy It! The Moderating Effect of Seeking Sensory Pleasure When Exposed to Participatory CSR Campaigns.Salvador Ruiz de Maya, Rafaela Lardín-Zambudio & Inés López-López - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
  • Private Regulatory Fragmentation as Public Policy: Governing Canada’s Mining Industry.José Carlos Marques - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 135 (4):617-630.
    This paper addresses recent calls to study the role of the state in private regulation. Integrating current scholarship on the state as a catalyst of private regulatory regimes with prior literature on regulatory failure and self-regulation, it identifies and problematizes unsettled assumptions used as a starting point by this growing body of research. The case study traces the evolution of public debates and the interaction of different regulatory initiatives dealing with corporate social responsibility issues in Canada’s mining industry. Findings reveal (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Towards a More 'Ethically Correct' Governance for Economic Sustainability.Christos N. Pitelis - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 118 (3):655-665.
    In this paper, we propose that economic sustainability is seen in terms of (inter-temporal and inter-national) value creation. We claim that value appropriation (or capture), can become a constraint to economic sustainability. We propose that for sustainable value creation to be fostered, corporate governance needs to be aligned to public and supra-national governance. In order to achieve this, a hierarchically layered set of ‘agencies’, needs to be diagnosed and the issue of incentive alignment addressed. Enlightened self-interest, pluralism and diversity, as (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • What’s in a Name: An Analysis of Impact Investing Understandings by Academics and Practitioners.Anna Katharina Höchstädter & Barbara Scheck - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 132 (2):449-475.
  • Examining the Win‐Win Proposition of Shared Value Across Contexts: Implications for Future Application.Annika Voltan, Chantal Hervieux & Albert Mills - 2017 - Business Ethics: A European Review 26 (4):347-368.
    This article examines the concept of creating shared value as articulated by Michael Porter and Mark Kramer, in non-Western and Western contexts. We define non-Western contexts as those in so-called “developing” countries and emerging economies, whereas Western ones pertain to dominant thinking in “developed” regions. We frame our research in postcolonial theory and offer an overview of existing critiques of CSV. We conduct a critical discourse analysis of 66 articles to identify how CSV is being cited by authors, and potential (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Doing Good Business by Hiring Directors with Foreign Experience.Jian Zhang, Dongmin Kong & Ji Wu - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 153 (3):859-876.
    Using a manually collected dataset on the overseas experiences of directors of Chinese listed firms, we examine the effects of returnee directors on firms’ corporate social responsibility engagement. Our results show that returnee directors significantly improve their firms’ CSR engagement. The positive relationship between the percentage of returnee directors and CSR engagement is more significant when a firm is in a competitive industry, when a firm has no government ownership, when a firm’s CEO is not politically connected, and when a (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark