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  1. Mechanisms: What Are They Evidence for in Evidence-Based Medicine?Holly Andersen - 2012 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (5):992-999.
    Even though the evidence‐based medicine movement (EBM) labels mechanisms a low quality form of evidence, consideration of the mechanisms on which medicine relies, and the distinct roles that mechanisms might play in clinical practice, offers a number of insights into EBM itself. In this paper, I examine the connections between EBM and mechanisms from several angles. I diagnose what went wrong in two examples where mechanistic reasoning failed to generate accurate predictions for how a dysfunctional mechanism would respond to intervention. (...)
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  • Polanyi's Tacit Knowing and the Relevance of Epistemology to Clinical Medicine.Stephen G. Henry - 2010 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 16 (2):292-297.
  • Tacit Clues and the Science of Clinical Judgement [a Commentary on Henry Et Al.].Hillel D. Braude - 2011 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 17 (5):940-943.
  • Clinical Judgement: Multidisciplinary Perspectives.Benjamin Chin-Yee & Jonathan Fuller - 2018 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 24 (3):635-637.
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  • An Integrated Model of Clinical Reasoning: Dual‐Process Theory of Cognition and Metacognition.James A. Marcum - 2012 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (5):954-961.
  • Human All Too Human Reasoning: Comparing Clinical and Phenomenological Intuition.H. D. Braude - 2013 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 38 (2):173-189.
    This paper compares clinical intuition and phenomenological intuition. I begin with a brief analysis of Husserl’s conception of intuition. Second, I review the attitude toward clinical intuition by physicians and philosophers. Third, I discuss the Aristotelian conception of intellectual intuition or nous and its relation to phronesis. Phronesis provides a philosophical ground for clinical intuition by linking medicine as both a techné and praxis. Considering medicine as a techné, Pellegrino and Thomasma exclude clinical intuitions from their philosophy of medicine. However, (...)
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  • Miriam Solomon: Making Medical Knowledge.Hillel Braude - 2016 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 37 (5):433-436.
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  • A Social-Technological Epistemology of Clinical Decision-Making as Mediated by Imaging.Sophie van Baalen, Annamaria Carusi, Ian Sabroe & David G. Kiely - 2017 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 23 (5):949-958.
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