Citations of work:

Robert B. Brandom (2007). The Structure of Desire and Recognition: Self-Consciousness and Self-Constitution.

13 found
Order:
Are we missing citations?

PhilPapers citations & references are currently in beta testing. We expect to add many more in the future.

Meanwhile, you can use our bibliography tool to import references for this or another work.

Or you can directly add citations for the above work:

  1.  3
    Recognition and Personhood: A Critique of Bernstein's Account of the Wrongfulness of Torture.Johnny Brennan - forthcoming - European Journal of Philosophy.
    J. M. Bernstein argues that to capture the depths of the harm of torture, we need to do away with the idea that we possess intrinsic and inviolable worth. If personhood is inviolable, then torture can inflict only apparent harm on our standing as persons. Bernstein claims that torture is a paradigm of moral injury because it causes what he calls “devastation”: The victim experiences an actual degradation of his or her personhood. Bernstein argues that our value is given to (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2.  6
    Organic Imagination as Intuitive Intellect: Self‐Knowledge and Self‐Constitution in Hegel's Early Critique of Kant.Joshua Wretzel - forthcoming - European Journal of Philosophy.
    This paper concerns Hegel's early treatment of the productive imagination in his 1803–1804 Faith and Knowledge. I show how he articulates that activity in terms of a pair of speculative unities, which solve lingering problems of self-knowledge and self-constitution from Kant's B-deduction. On the one hand, I argue that the familiar unity of spontaneity and receptivity makes possible knowledge of the moment of self-positing. On the other hand, I contend that Hegel's talk of imagination as both an “organic idea” and (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3.  14
    Opposition Instead of Recognition: The Social Significance of “Determinations of Reflection” in Hegel’s Science of Logic.Arash Abazari - 2018 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 44 (3):253-277.
    Axel Honneth reconstructs Hegel’s social and political philosophy on the basis of the concept of recognition. For Honneth, recognition is a constitutive relation between individuals that is in principle symmetrical. By conceiving recognition through symmetry, Honneth effectively bans the inclusion of power within recognitive relation. He thus regards the relations of power as cases of non-recognition or misrecognition. In this paper, I develop an alternative theory of the constitutive relation between individuals for Hegel, one that is based on the asymmetrical (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4.  8
    Brandom on Norms and Objectivity.Leonardo Marchettoni - 2018 - Critical Horizons 19 (3):215-232.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5.  19
    Second Nature and Historical Change in Hegel’s Philosophy of History.Simon Lumsden - 2016 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 24 (1):74-94.
    Hegel’s philosophy of history is fundamentally concerned with how shapes of life collapse and transition into new shapes of life. One of the distinguishing features of Hegel’s concern with how a shape of life falls apart and becomes inadequate is the role that habit plays in the transition. A shape of life is an embodied form of existence for Hegel. The animating concepts of a shape of life are affectively inscribed on subjects through complex cultural processes. This paper examines the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6.  39
    Towards a Conflict Theory of Recognition: On the Constitution of Relations of Recognition in Conflict.Georg W. Bertram & Robin Celikates - 2015 - European Journal of Philosophy 23 (4):838-861.
    In this paper, we develop an understanding of recognition in terms of individuals’ capacity for conflict. Our goal is to overcome various shortcomings that can be found in both the positive and negative conceptions of recognition. We start by analyzing paradigmatic instances of such conceptions—namely, those put forward by Axel Honneth and Judith Butler. We do so in order to show how both positions are inadequate in their elaborations of recognition in an analogous way: Both fail to make intelligible the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  7.  88
    Recognition, Freedom, and the Self in Fichte's Foundations of Natural Right.Michael Nance - 2015 - European Journal of Philosophy 23 (3):608-632.
    In this paper I present an interpretation of J. G. Fichte's transcendental argument for the necessity of mutual recognition in Foundations of Natural Right. Fichte's argument purports to show that, as a condition of the possibility of self-consciousness, we must take ourselves to stand in relations of mutual recognition with other agents like ourselves. After reconstructing the steps of Fichte's argument, I present what I call the ‘modal dilemma’, which highlights a serious ambiguity in Fichte's deduction. According to the modal (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  8.  38
    Hegel's “Objective Spirit”, Extended Mind, and the Institutional Nature of Economic Action.Ivan A. Boldyrev & Carsten Herrmann-Pillath - 2013 - Mind and Society 12 (2):177-202.
    This paper explores the implications of the recent revival of Hegel studies for the philosophy of economics. We argue that Hegel’s theory of Objective Spirit anticipates many elements of modern approaches in cognitive sciences and of the philosophy of mind, which adopt an externalist framework. In particular, Hegel pre-empts the theories of social and distributed cognition. The pivotal elements of Hegelian social ontology are the continuity thesis, the performativity thesis, and the recognition thesis, which, when taken together, imply that all (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9.  13
    Fanon.Stefan Bird-Pollan - 2012 - Critical Horizons 13 (3):377 - 399.
  10.  30
    Sacrifice In Hegel'sPhenomenology Of Spirit.Paolo Diego Bubbio - 2012 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 20 (4):1-19.
    In this paper I rely on recent literature that emphasises the importance of recognition in Hegel's philosophy in order to apply the recognition-theoretic approach to the notion of sacrifice in the Phenomenology of Spirit. Firstly, I conduct a preliminary analysis by examining the general meaning of sacrifice as a form of determinate negation. Secondly, I focus on two phenomenological moments (the struggle between ?faith? and ?pure insight?, and the cult) in order to answer the question, ?Is a real (effective and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  11.  40
    Misrecognition, Misrecognition, and Fallibility.Arto Laitinen - 2012 - Res Publica 18 (1):25-38.
    Misrecognition from other individuals and social institutions is by its dynamic or ‘logic’ such that it can lead to distorted relations-to-self, such as self-hatred, and can truncate the development of the central capabilities of persons. Thus it is worth trying to shed light on how mis recognition differs from adequate recognition, and on how mis recognition might differ from other kinds of mistreatment and disregard. This paper suggests that mis recognition (including nonrecognition) is a matter of inadequate responsiveness to the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  12.  29
    Being Oneself in Another: Recognition and the Culturalist Deformation of Identity.Radu Neculau - 2012 - Inquiry : An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 55 (2):148-170.
    Abstract Nancy Fraser raises serious doubts about the critical potential of identity theories of recognition on the ground that they encourage the reduction of personal identity to cultural identity. Based on a comparative analysis of Charles Taylor's and Axel Honneth's theories of recognition, this paper argues that Fraser's critique is justified with respect to some aspects of Taylor's theory of identity, but not with respect to his conception of recognition, or to Honneth's conception of both identity and recognition. Taylor's theory (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  13. How Does Recognition Emerge From Nature? The Genesis of Consciousness in Hegel’s Jena Writings.Italo Testa - 2012 - Critical Horizons 13 (2):176-196.
    The paper proposes a reconstruction of some fragments of Hegel’s Jena manuscripts concerning the natural genesis of recognitive spiritual consciousness. On this basis it will be argued that recognition has a foothold in nature. As a consequence, recognition should not be understood as a bootstrapping process, that is, as a self-positing and self-justifying normative social phenomenon, intelligible within itself and independently of anything external to it.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations