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  1. Can Limitations of Visuospatial Attention Be Circumvented? A Review.Basil Wahn & Peter König - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
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  • What Am I Looking At? Interpreting Dynamic and Static Gaze Displays.Margot Wermeskerken, Damien Litchfield & Tamara Gog - 2018 - Cognitive Science 42 (1):220-252.
    Displays of eye movements may convey information about cognitive processes but require interpretation. We investigated whether participants were able to interpret displays of their own or others' eye movements. In Experiments 1 and 2, participants observed an image under three different viewing instructions. Then they were shown static or dynamic gaze displays and had to judge whether it was their own or someone else's eye movements and what instruction was reflected. Participants were capable of recognizing the instruction reflected in their (...)
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  • Joint Perception: Gaze and Social Context.Daniel C. Richardson, Chris N. H. Street, Joanne Y. M. Tan, Natasha Z. Kirkham, Merrit A. Hoover & Arezou Ghane Cavanaugh - 2012 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.
  • How Does It Feel to Act Together?Elisabeth Pacherie - 2014 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 13 (1):25-46.
    This paper on the phenomenology of joint agency proposes a foray into a little explored territory at the intersection of two very active domains of research: joint action and sense of agency. I explore two ways in which our experience of joint agency may differ from our experience of individual agency. First, the mechanisms of action specification and control involved in joint action are typically more complex than those present in individual actions, since it is crucial for joint action that (...)
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  • Using Gaze Patterns to Predict Task Intent in Collaboration.Chien-Ming Huang, Sean Andrist, Allison Sauppé & Bilge Mutlu - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  • Two Trackers Are Better Than One: Information About the Co-Actor's Actions and Performance Scores Contribute to the Collective Benefit in a Joint Visuospatial Task.Wahn Basil, Kingstone Alan & König Peter - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
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  • The Role of Shared Visual Information for Joint Action Coordination.Cordula Vesper, Laura Schmitz, Lou Safra, Natalie Sebanz & Günther Knoblich - 2016 - Cognition 153:118-123.
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  • The Social Situation Affects How We Process Feedback About Our Actions.Artur Czeszumski, Benedikt V. Ehinger, Basil Wahn & Peter König - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
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  • The Impact of Expert Visual Guidance on Trainee Visual Search Strategy, Visual Attention and Motor Skills.Daniel R. Leff, David R. C. James, Felipe Orihuela-Espina, Ka-Wai Kwok, Loi Wah Sun, George Mylonas, Thanos Athanasiou, Ara W. Darzi & Guang-Zhong Yang - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  • Performance in a Collaborative Search Task: The Role of Feedback and Alignment.Moreno I. Coco, Rick Dale & Frank Keller - 2018 - Topics in Cognitive Science 10 (1):55-79.
    When people communicate, they coordinate a wide range of linguistic and non-linguistic behaviors. This process of coordination is called alignment, and it is assumed to be fundamental to successful communication. In this paper, we question this assumption and investigate whether disalignment is a more successful strategy in some cases. More specifically, we hypothesize that alignment correlates with task success only when communication is interactive. We present results from a spot-the-difference task in which dyads of interlocutors have to decide whether they (...)
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  • Social Beliefs and Visual Attention: How the Social Relevance of a Cue Influences Spatial Orienting.Matthias S. Gobel, Miles R. A. Tufft & Daniel C. Richardson - 2018 - Cognitive Science 42 (S1):161-185.
    We are highly tuned to each other's visual attention. Perceiving the eye or hand movements of another person can influence the timing of a saccade or the reach of our own. However, the explanation for such spatial orienting in interpersonal contexts remains disputed. Is it due to the social appearance of the cue—a hand or an eye—or due to its social relevance—a cue that is connected to another person with attentional and intentional states? We developed an interpersonal version of the (...)
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  • But is It Social? How to Tell When Groups Are More Than the Sum of Their Members.Allison A. Brennan & James T. Enns - 2016 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 39.
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  • What Am I Looking At? Interpreting Dynamic and Static Gaze Displays.Margot van Wermeskerken, Damien Litchfield & Tamara van Gog - 2018 - Cognitive Science 42 (1):220-252.
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  • How the Eyes Tell Lies: Social Gaze During a Preference Task.Tom Foulsham & Maria Lock - 2015 - Cognitive Science 39 (7):1704-1726.
    Social attention is thought to require detecting the eyes of others and following their gaze. To be effective, observers must also be able to infer the person's thoughts and feelings about what he or she is looking at, but this has only rarely been investigated in laboratory studies. In this study, participants' eye movements were recorded while they chose which of four patterns they preferred. New observers were subsequently able to reliably guess the preference response by watching a replay of (...)
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  • Joint Action: Current Perspectives.Bruno Galantucci & Natalie Sebanz - 2009 - Topics in Cognitive Science 1 (2):255-259.
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