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What is recollective memory?

In David C. Rubin (ed.), Remembering Our Past: Studies in Autobiographical Memory. Cambridge University Press (1996)

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  1. Philosophy and Memory Traces: Descartes to Connectionism.John Sutton - 1998 - Cambridge University Press.
    Philosophy and Memory Traces defends two theories of autobiographical memory. One is a bewildering historical view of memories as dynamic patterns in fleeting animal spirits, nervous fluids which rummaged through the pores of brain and body. The other is new connectionism, in which memories are 'stored' only superpositionally, and reconstructed rather than reproduced. Both models, argues John Sutton, depart from static archival metaphors by employing distributed representation, which brings interference and confusion between memory traces. Both raise urgent issues about control (...)
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  • Collective Mental Time Travel: Remembering the Past and Imagining the Future Together.Kourken Michaelian & John Sutton - 2019 - Synthese 196 (12):4933-4960.
    Bringing research on collective memory together with research on episodic future thought, Szpunar and Szpunar :376–389, 2016) have recently developed the concept of collective future thought. Individual memory and individual future thought are increasingly seen as two forms of individual mental time travel, and it is natural to see collective memory and collective future thought as forms of collective mental time travel. But how seriously should the notion of collective mental time travel be taken? This article argues that, while collective (...)
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  • Memory.Kourken Michaelian & John Sutton - 2017 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Remembering is one of the most characteristic and most puzzling of human activities. Personal memory, in particular - the ability mentally to travel back into the past, as leading psychologist Endel Tulving puts it - often has intense emotional or moral significance: it is perhaps the most striking manifestation of the peculiar way human beings are embedded in time, and of our limited but genuine freedom from our present environment and our immediate needs. Memory has been significant in the history (...)
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  • I Can See It Both Ways: First- and Third-Person Visual Perspectives at Retrieval.Heather J. Rice & David C. Rubin - 2009 - Consciousness and Cognition 18 (4):877-890.
    The number of studies examining visual perspective during retrieval has recently grown. However, the way in which perspective has been conceptualized differs across studies. Some studies have suggested perspective is experienced as either a first-person or a third-person perspective, whereas others have suggested both perspectives can be experienced during a single retrieval attempt. This aspect of perspective was examined across three studies, which used different measurement techniques commonly used in studies of perspective. Results suggest that individuals can experience more than (...)
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  • Operationaling “Correspondence”.David C. Palmer - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):206-207.
    The research guided by the correspondence metaphor is lauded for its emphasis on functional analysis, but the term “correspondence” itself needs clarification. Of the two terms in the relationship, only one is well defined. It is suggested that behavior at acquisition needs to be analyzed and that molecular principles from the learning laboratory might be useful in doing so.
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  • Dimensiones de análisis de los recuerdos personales como recuerdos afectivos.Marina Trakas - 2021 - Revista de Psicología UNLP 20 (1):256-284.
    La investigación reciente en psicología cognitiva sobre la memoria emocional ha estudiado las distintas formas en que las emociones afectan a la memoria, sin profundizar no obstante en la comprensión de la manera en que los aspectos emocionales, afectivos y mnemónicos se encuentran estrechamente entrelazados en el contenido mismo de un acto de reminiscencia. En este artículo propongo un marco conceptual de análisis que nos permite entender los recuerdos personales como recuerdos esencialmente afectivos, y que se articula en torno a (...)
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  • Personal Memories.Marina Trakas - 2015 - Dissertation, Macquarie University
  • Continuities and Discontinuities Between Imagination and Memory: The View From Philosophy.Kourken Michaelian, Denis Perrin & André Sant'Anna - forthcoming - In Anna Abraham (ed.), The Cambridge Handbook of Imagination. Cambridge University Press.
  • Editorial: Memory as Mental Time Travel.André Sant’Anna, Kourken Michaelian & Denis Perrin - 2020 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 11 (2):223-232.
    Originally understood as memory for the “what”, the “when”, and the “where” of experienced past events, episodic memory has, in recent years, been redefined as a form of past-oriented mental time travel. Following a brief review of empirical research on memory as mental time travel, this introduction provides an overview of the contributions to the special issue, which explore the theoretical implications of that research.
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  • Individual Differences in the Phenomenology of Mental Time Travel: The Effect of Vivid Visual Imagery and Emotion Regulation Strategies.A. DArgembeau & M. Vanderlinden - 2006 - Consciousness and Cognition 15 (2):342-350.
    It has been claimed that the ability to remember the past and the ability to project oneself into the future are intimately related. We sought support for this proposition by examining whether individual differences in dimensions that have been shown to affect memory for past events similarly influence the experience of projecting oneself into the future. We found that individuals with a higher capacity for visual imagery experienced more visual and other sensory details both when remembering past events and when (...)
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  • User-Centered Virtual Reality for Promoting Relaxation: An Innovative Approach.Silvia Francesca Maria Pizzoli, Ketti Mazzocco, Stefano Triberti, Dario Monzani, Mariano Luis Alcañiz Raya & Gabriella Pravettoni - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
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  • Metamemory Appraisals in Autobiographical Event Recall.Alan Scoboria, Jennifer M. Talarico & Lisa Pascal - 2015 - Cognition 136:337-349.
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  • Functional Memory Requires a Quite Different Value Metaphor.Norman H. Anderson - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):190-191.
    The function of memory is to allow past experience to subserve present goal-oriented thought and action. The defining characteristic of goal-oriented approach/avoidance is value. Value lies beyond the reproductive conception of memory that is basic to both metaphors discussed in Koriat & Goldsmith's target article. Functional memory requires a quite different metaphor, for which a grounded theory is available.
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  • Everyday Memory and Activity.Richard Alterman - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):189-190.
    The target article interprets current psychological research on everyday memory in terms of a correspondence metaphor. This metaphor is based on a reduction of everyday memory to autobiographical and eyewitness memory. This commentary focuses on everyday memory as it functions in activity. Viewed from this perspective, the joining of everyday memory to a correspondence metaphor is problematic. A more natural way to frame the processes of everyday memory is in terms of context, practice, and pragmatics.
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  • Correspondence Conception of Memory: A Good Match is Hard to Find.Daniel Algom - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):188-189.
    The distinction that Koriat & Goldsmith have drawn between laboratory and naturalistic research is largely valid, but the metaphor they have chosen to characterize the latter may not be optimal. The “correspondence” approach is vulnerable on conceptual grounds and is not applicable to significant portions of empirical research.
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  • On Correspondence, Accuracy, and Truth.Ian Maynard Begg - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):191-192.
    Koriat & Goldsmith raise important questions about memory, but there is need for caution: first, if we define accuracy by output measures, there is a danger that a perfectly accurate memory can be nearly useless. Second, when we focus on correspondence, there is a danger that syntactic correspondence will be mistaken for historical truth.
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  • The Correspondence Metaphor of Memory: Right, Wrong, or Useful?Asher Koriat & Morris Goldsmith - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):211-228.
    Our response to the commentators covers four general issues: How useful is our proposed conceptualization of the real-life/laboratory controversy in terms of the contrast between the correspondence and storehouse metaphors? What is the relationship between these two metaphors? What are the unique implications of the correspondence metaphor for memory assessment and theory? What are the nature and role of memory metaphors in memory research? We stress that the correspondence metaphor can be usefully exploited independent of the real-life/laboratory controversy, but that (...)
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  • Hypothesis Testing in Experimental and Naturalistic Memory Research.Daniel B. Wright - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):210-211.
    Koriat & Goldsmith's distinction between the correspondence and storehouse metaphors is valuable for both memory theory and methodology. It is questionable, however, whether this distinction underlies the heated debate about so called “everyday memory” research. The distinction between experimental and naturalistic methodologies better characterizes this debate. I compare these distinctions and discuss how the methodological distinction, between experimental and naturalistic designs, could give rise to different theoretical approaches.
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  • Contexts and Functions of Retrieval.Eugene Winograd - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):209-210.
    Koriat & Goldsmith provide an excellent analysis of the flexibility of retrieval processes and how they are situationally dependent. I agree with their emphasis on functional considerations and argue that the traditional laboratory experiment motivates the subject to be accurate. However, I disagree with their strong claim that the quantity–accuracy distinction implies an essential discontinuity between traditional and naturalistic approaches to the study of memory.
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  • Direct Remembering and the Correspondence Metaphor.K. Geoffrey White - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):208-209.
    The correspondence view is consistent with a theory of direct remembering that assumes continuity between perception and memory. Two implications of direct remembering for correspondence are suggested. It is assumed that forgetting is exponential, and that remembering at one time is independent of factors influencing remembering at another. Elaboration of the correspondence view in the same terms as perception offers a novel approach to the study of memory.
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  • Classical Antecedents for Modern Metaphors for Memory.Jocelyn Penny Small - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):208-208.
    Classical antiquity provides not just the storehouse metaphor, which postdates Plato, but also parts of the correspondence metaphor. In the fifth century B.C., Thucydides considered the role of gist and accuracy in writing history, and Aristotle offered an explanation. Finally, the Greek for truth means “that which is not forgotten.”.
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  • Amnesia and Metamemory Demonstrate the Importance of Both Metaphors.Bennett L. Schwartz - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):207-207.
    The correspondence metaphor is useful in developing functional models of memory. However, the storehouse metaphor is still useful in developing structural and process models of memory. Traditional research techniques explore the structure of memory; everyday techniques explore the function of memory. We illustrate this point with two examples: amnesia and metamemory. In each phenomenon, both metaphors are useful.
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  • Beyond the Correspondence Metaphor: When Accuracy Cannot Be Assessed.Ian R. Newby & Michael Ross - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):205-206.
    Koriat & Goldsmith propose that the correspondence metaphor captures the essence of everyday memory research. We suggest that correspondence is often not at issue because objective assessments of everyday events are frequently lacking. In these cases, other questions arise, such as how individuals evaluate the validity of memories and the significance they attach to those evaluations.
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  • Metacognition, Metaphors, and the Measurement of Human Memory.Thomas O. Nelson - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):204-205.
    Investigations of metacognition – and also the application of the storehouse and correspondence metaphors – seem as appropriate for laboratory research as for naturalistic research. In terms of measurement, the only quantitative difference between the “input-bound percent correct” and “output-bound percent correct” is the inclusion versus exclusion of omission errors in the denominator of the percentages.
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  • Remembering as Doing.Ulric Neisser - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):203-204.
    Koriat & Goldsmith are right in their claim that the “ecological” and “traditional” approaches to memory rely on different metaphors. But the underlying ecological metaphor is notcorrespondence: it isaction. Remembering is a kind of doing; like most other forms of action it is purposive, personal, and particular.
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  • False Dichotomies and Dead Metaphors.Timothy P. McNamara - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):203-203.
    Koriat & Goldsmith's thesis is provocative but has three problems: First, quantity and accuracy are not simply related, they are complementary. Second, the storehouse metaphor is not the driving force behind contemporary theories of memory and may not be viable. Third, the taxonomy is incomplete, leaving unclassified several extremely influential methods and measures, such as priming and response latency.
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  • The Phenomenal Object of Memory and Control Processes.Giuliana Mazzoni - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):202-203.
    This commentary deals with criteria for assigning truth values to memory contents. A parallel with perception shows how truth values can be assigned by considering subjects' beliefs about the truth state of the memory content. This topic is also relevant to the study of processes of control over retrieval.
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  • Accuracy and Quantity Are Poor Measures of Recall and Recognition.Andrew R. Mayes, Rob van Eijk & Patricia L. Gooding - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):201-202.
    The value of accuracy and quantity as memory measures is assessed. It is argued that accuracy does not measure correspondence because it ignores omissions and correct rejections, quantity is confounded with monitoring in recall, and in recognition, if targets and foils are unequal, both measures, even together, still ignore correct rejections.
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  • Correspondence to the Past: The Essence of the Archaeology Metaphor.Steen F. Larsen - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):200-201.
    The correspondence view of memory is not a metaphor. However, correspondence is the essential feature of the archaeology metaphor, which harks back to Freud and Neisser. A modern version of this metaphor and some of its implications are briefly described. The archaeology metaphor integrates the idea of stored traces in a nonmechanistic framework.
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  • Let's Forget the Everyday/Laboratory Controversy.Lia Kvavilashvili & Judi Ellis - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):199-200.
    In contrast to its aims, Koriat & Goldsmith's article vividly demonstrates the complementarity of ecological and traditional approaches and the difficulty of characterising the growing diversity of memory research with a single set of distinctions. Moreover, the contrast between correspondence and storehouse metaphors is important enough to stand alone without reference to an everyday/laboratory controversy, which is neither acute nor necessary.
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  • The Storehouse/Correspondence Partition in Memory Research: Promises and Perils.Arie W. Kruglanski - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):198-199.
    The novel correspondence metaphor outlined by Koriat & Goldsmith offers important advantages for studying critical issues of memory-accuracy. It also fits well with the current emphasis on the reconstructive nature of memory and on the role of cognitive, metacognitive, and motivational factors in memory performance. These positive features notwithstanding, the storehouse/correspondence framework faces potential perils having to do with its implied linkage to the laboratory/real-life controversy and its proposal of studying correspondence issues in isolation from memory phenomena captured by the (...)
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  • Driving and Dish-Washing: Failure of the Correspondence Metaphor for Memory.Keith S. Karn & Gregory J. Zelinsky - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):198-198.
    Koriat & Goldsmith restrict their definition of memory to “being about some past event,” which causes them to ignore the most common use of memory: everyday visual-motor tasks. New techniques make it possible to study memory in the context of these natural tasks with which memory is so tightly coupled. Memory can be more fully understood in the context of these actions.
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  • Implications of Output-Bound Measures for Laboratory and Field Research in Memory.Ronald P. Fisher - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):197-197.
    Everyday memory tasks often require that researchers focus on output-bound measures of memory. As a result, nonmemorial processes may influence recall accuracy. These nonmemorial processes, usually eliminated by laboratory researchers, have the potential to explain some anomalous results and may even be useful to enhance everyday recollection.
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  • The Real-Life/Laboratory Controversy as Viewed From the Cognitive Neurobiology of Animal Learning and Memory.Howard Eichenbaum - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):196-197.
    Parallel to Koriat & Goldsmith's accounting of human memory, there are two distinct approaches in animal learning. Behaviorist approaches focus on quantitative aspects of conditioned response probability, whereas cognitive and ethological approaches focus on qualitative aspects of how memory is used in real life. Moreover, in animal research these distinguishable measures of memory are dissociated in experimental amnesia.
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  • What Do Memories Correspond To?Martin A. Conway - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):195-196.
    Neither the storehouse nor the correspondence metaphor is an appropriate conceptual framework for memory research. Instead a meaning-based account of human memory is required. The correspondence metaphor is an advance over previous suggestions but entails an oversimple view of “accuracy.” Freud's account of memory may provide a more fruitful approach to memory and meaning.
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  • The Correspondence Metaphor: Prescriptive or Descriptive?Darryl Bruce - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):194-195.
    Koriat & Goldsmith's abstract correspondence metaphor is unlikely to prove useful to memory science. It aims to motivate and inform the investigation of everyday memory, but that movement has prospered without it. The irrelevance of its competitor – the more concrete storehouse metaphor – as a guiding force in memory research presages a similar fate for the correspondence perspective.
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  • Memory, Metamemory, and Conditional Statistics.Robert A. Bjork & Thomas D. Wickens - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):193-194.
    Koriat & Goldsmith's distinction between encoding processes and metamnemonic decision processes is theoretically and practically important, as is their methodology for separating the two. However, their accuracy measure is a conditional statistic, subject to the unfathomable selection effects that have hindered analogous measures in the past. We also find their arguments concerning basic and applied research mostly beside the point.
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  • The Alternative to the Storehouse Metaphor.Aaron Ben-Ze'ev - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):192-193.
    Koriat and Goldsmith clearly show the need for an alternative to the storehouse metaphor; however, the alternative metaphor they choose – the correspondence metaphor – is problematic. A more suitable one is the capacity metaphor.
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  • Memory Metaphors and the Real-Life/Laboratory Controversy: Correspondence Versus Storehouse Conceptions of Memory.Asher Koriat & Morris Goldsmith - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):167-188.
    The study of memory is witnessing a spirited clash between proponents of traditional laboratory research and those advocating a more naturalistic approach to the study of “real-life” or “everyday” memory. The debate has generally centered on the “what”, “where”, and “how” of memory research. In this target article, we argue that the controversy discloses a further, more fundamental breach between two underlying memory metaphors, each having distinct implications for memory theory and assessment: Whereas traditional memory research has been dominated by (...)
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  • The Construction of Autobiographical Memories in the Self-Memory System.Martin A. Conway & Christopher W. Pleydell-Pearce - 2000 - Psychological Review 107 (2):261-288.
  • Memory as Mental Time Travel.Denis Perrin & Kourken Michaelian - 2017 - In Sven Bernecker & Kourken Michaelian (eds.), Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Memory. Routledge. pp. 228-239.
  • Personal Semantics: At the Crossroads of Semantic and Episodic Memory.Louis Renoult, Patrick Sr Davidson, Daniela J. Palombo, Morris Moscovitch & Brian Levine - 2012 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 16 (11):550-558.
  • Recordação autobiográfica: reconsiderando dados fenomenais e correlatos neurais.Gustavo Gauer & William Barbosa Gomes - 2008 - Revista Aletheia 27:36-50.
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  • What If You Went to the Police and Accused Your Uncle of Abuse? Misunderstandings Concerning the Benefits of Memory Distortion: A Commentary on Fernández.Henry Otgaar, Mark L. Howe, Andrew Clark, Jianqin Wang & Harald Merckelbach - 2015 - Consciousness and Cognition 33:286-290.
  • Rethinking the Relationship Between Memory and Imagination in Sartre's the Imaginary.Lior Levy - 2012 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 43 (2):143-160.
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  • Vantage Perspective During Encoding: The Effects on Phenomenological Memory Characteristics.Nora Mooren, Julie Krans, Gérard W. B. Näring, Michelle L. Moulds & Agnes van Minnen - 2016 - Consciousness and Cognition 42:142-149.
  • Ways of Sampling Voluntary and Involuntary Autobiographical Memories in Daily Life.Anne S. Rasmussen, Kim B. Johannessen & Dorthe Berntsen - 2014 - Consciousness and Cognition 30:156-168.
  • The Relation Between Reproductive and Reconstructive Processing of Memory Content.Harry P. Bahrick - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):191-191.
    Quantitative losses of memory content imply replicative processing; correspondence losses imply reconstructive processing. Research should focus on the relationship between these processes by obtaining accuracy- and quantity-based indicators of memory within the same framework. This approach will also yield information about the effects of task and individual-difference variables on loss and distortion, as well as the time course of each process.
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  • Dissociative Effects of Alcohol on Recollective Experience.H. Valerie Curran & Michael Hildebrandt - 1999 - Consciousness and Cognition 8 (4):497-509.
    This article reports a study comparing the effects of a single dose of alcohol with a matched placebo drink on recognition memory with and without conscious recollection. A double-blind, cross-over design was used with healthy volunteers who were all social drinkers. Processing depth at study was manipulated using generate versus read instructions. Conscious recollection at test was assessed using the remember-know-guess paradigm (Gardiner, 1988; Tulving, 1985). Alcohol significantly reduced conscious recollection (remember responses) but had no effect on recognition in the (...)
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  • Experiences of Remembering, Knowing, and Guessing.John M. Gardiner, Cristina Ramponi & Alan Richardson-Klavehn - 1998 - Consciousness and Cognition 7 (1):1-26.
    This article presents and discusses transcripts of some 270 explanations subjects provided subsequently for recognition memory decisions that had been associated with remember, know, or guess responses at the time the recognition decisions were made. Only transcripts for remember responses included reports of recollective experiences, which seemed mostly to reflect either effortful elaborative encoding or involuntary reminding at study, especially in relation to the self. Transcripts for know responses included claims of just knowing, and of feelings of familiarity. These transcripts (...)
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