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  1. Habits, Skills and Embodied Experiences: A Contribution to Philosophy of Physical Education.Øyvind F. Standal & Kenneth Aggerholm - 2016 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 10 (3):269-282.
    One of the main topics in philosophical work dealing with physical education is if and how the subject can justify its educational value. Acquisition of practical knowledge in the form of skills and the provision of positive and meaningful embodied experiences are central to the justification of physical education. The purpose of this article is to explore the relationship between skill and embodied experience in physical education through the notion and concept of habit. The literature on phenomenology of skill acquisition (...)
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  • Against a “Mindless” Account of Perceptual Expertise.Amit Chaturvedi - 2019 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 18 (3):509-531.
    According to Hubert Dreyfus’s famous claim that expertise is fundamentally “mindless,” experts in any domain perform most effectively when their activity is automatic and unmediated by concepts or cognitive processes like attention and memory. While several scholars have recently challenged the plausibility of Dreyfus’s “mindless” account of expertise for explaining a wide range of expert activities, there has been little consideration of the one form of expertise which might be most amenable to Dreyfus’s account – namely, perceptual expertise. Indeed, Dreyfus’s (...)
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  • ‘Being in Your Body’ and ‘Being in the Moment’: The Dancing Body-Subject and Inhabited Transcendence.Aimie C. E. Purser - 2018 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 45 (1):37-52.
    Sports studies is currently dominated by the intellectualist approach to understanding skill and expertise, meaning that questions about the phenomenological nature of skilled performance in sport have generally been overshadowed by the emphasis on the cognitive. By contrast, this article responds to calls for a phenomenology of sporting embodiment by opening up a philosophical exploration of the nature of athletic being-in-the-world. In particular, the paper explores the conceptualisation of immanence and transcendence in relation to the embodied practice of dance, engaging (...)
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  • Embodied Rilkean Sport-Specific Knowledge.Arturo Leyva - 2018 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 45 (2):128-143.
    This paper develops and introduces the embodied Rilkean sport-specific knowledge into the current sports knowledge philosophical debate. This idea is based on my interpretation of Mark Rowlands’ Rilkean memory theory. Broadly speaking, Rowlands proposed that an embodied Rilkean memory is memory content that is then ‘woven into the body and its neural infrastructure’ resulting in new bodily or behavioral dispositions. I propose that elite-level sports knowledge may become contentless bodily and/or behavioral dispositions and take the form of embodied Rilkean sport-specific (...)
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  • Searle, Merleau-Ponty, Rizzolatti – Three Perspectives on Intentionality and Action in Sport.Gunnar Breivik - 2017 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 44 (2):199-212.
    Actions in sport are intentional in character. They are directed at and are about something. This understanding of intentional action is common in continental as well as analytic philosophy. In sport philosophy, intentionality has received relatively little attention, but has more recently come on the agenda. In addition to what we can call ‘action intentionality,’ studied by philosophers like Searle, the phenomenological approach forwarded by Merleau-Ponty has opened up for a concept of ‘motor intentionality,’ which means a basic bodily attention (...)
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  • David Foster Wallace on Dumb Jocks and Athletic Genius.James Wilberding - 2017 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 44 (1):108-122.
    David Foster Wallace was genuinely troubled by what he perceived to be a serious incongruity in the mental lives of elite athletes. To perform with grace and beauty, elite athletes must be ‘geniuses,’ yet in conversation and prose these same athletes often exhibit such vapidity and banality that he was tempted to simply write them off as unintelligent or worse. In response to this puzzle, Wallace developed different philosophical conceptions of the elite athlete aimed at bridging the gap between genius (...)
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  • Academic Versus Sporting Knowledge. Robert L. Simon and the Debate About Sports on Campus.Gunnar Breivik - 2016 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 43 (1):61-74.
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  • The Importance of Imagination in Aesthetic Experience: Polanyian Thoughts on Elcombe.Peter M. Hopsicker - 2015 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 42 (2):209-218.
    In his recent work, ‘Sport, Aesthetic Experience, and Art as the Ideal Embodied Metaphor’, Tim L. Elcombe explores links between sport and art from a pragmatically informed conception of aesthetic experience. However, Elcombe's work does not highlight the role of the imagination in the interpretation of the aesthetic something Michael Polanyi claims to be the ‘cornerstone of aesthetic theory’. With the backdrop of an increased interest in the aesthetics, phenomenology, and epistemology of sport, this discussion essay seeks to defend the (...)
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  • 7—Riding The Wind—Consummate Performance, Phenomenology, and Skillful Fluency.Jesús Ilundáin-Agurruza - 2014 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 8 (4):374-419.
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  • Intentionality and Action in Sport: A Discussion of the Views of Searle and Dreyfus.Gunnar Breivik - 2018 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 12 (2):133-148.
    The article looks at sport as a form of human action where the participants display various forms of Intentionality. Intentionality may be defined as ‘that property of many mental states and events by which they are directed at or about or of objects and states of affairs in the world.’ Sporting actions are about human intentions, beliefs, desires, perceptions and not to forget, movements. This means that sports typically display what we call ‘Intentionality.’ The study of Intentionality and intentional actions (...)
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  • From Clumsy Failure to Skillful Fluency: A Phenomenological Analysis of and Eastern Solution to Sport’s Choking Effect.Jesús Ilundáin-Agurruza - 2015 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 14 (2):397-421.
    Excellent performance in sport involves specialized and refined skills within very narrow applications. Choking throws a wrench in the works of finely tuned performances. Functionally, and reduced to its simplest expression, choking is severe underperformance when engaging already mastered skills. Choking is a complex phenomenon with many intersecting facets: its dysfunctions result from the multifaceted interaction of cognitive and psychological processes, neurophysiological mechanisms, and phenomenological dynamics. This article develops a phenomenological model that, complementing empirical and theoretical research, helps understand and (...)
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  • High-Level Enactive and Embodied Cognition in Expert Sport Performance.Kevin Krein & Jesús Ilundáin-Agurruza - 2017 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 11 (3):370-384.
    Mental representation has long been central to standard accounts of action and cognition generally, and in the context of sport. We argue for an enactive and embodied account that rejects the idea that representation is necessary for cognition, and posit instead that cognition arises, or is enacted, in certain types of interactions between organisms and their environment. More specifically, we argue that enactive theories explain some kinds of high-level cognition, those that underlie some of the best performances in sport and (...)
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  • Understanding the Background Conditions of Skilled Movement in Sport: A Study of Searle's 'Background Capacities'.Vegard Fusche Moe - 2007 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 1 (3):299 – 324.
    In this paper I take up John Searle's account of ?Background capacities? to render intelligible the presupposed and hidden aspects of the background conditions that enable the performance of skilled movement. The paper begins with a review of Searle's initial account of Background capacities and how this picture can be applied to account for skilled movement in sport. Then an objection to this picture is addressed, claiming that Searle's initial picture might ?overrepresentationalise? background conditions. Moreover, this objection prompts how Searle (...)
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  • William James—Pragmatic Pioneer.Jesús Ilundáin-Agurruza - 2014 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 8 (3):258-270.
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  • Considering the Role of Cognitive Control in Expert Performance.John Toner, Barbara Gail Montero & Aidan Moran - 2015 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 14 (4):1127-1144.
    Dreyfus and Dreyfus’ influential phenomenological analysis of skill acquisition proposes that expert performance is guided by non-cognitive responses which are fast, effortless and apparently intuitive in nature. Although this model has been criticised for over-emphasising the role that intuition plays in facilitating skilled performance, it does recognise that on occasions a form of ‘detached deliberative rationality’ may be used by experts to improve their performance. However, Dreyfus and Dreyfus see no role for calculative problem solving or deliberation when performance is (...)
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  • 10—Everything Mysterious Under the Moon—Social Practices and Situated Holism.Jesús Ilundáin-Agurruza - 2014 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 8 (4):503-566.
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  • 6—Waking Up From The Cognitivist Dream—The Computational View of the Mind and High Performance.Jesús Ilundáin-Agurruza - 2014 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 8 (4):344-373.
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  • The Importance of Imagination in Aesthetic Experience: Polanyian Thoughts on Elcombe.Peter M. Hopsicker PhD - 2015 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 42 (2):209-218.
    In his recent work, ‘Sport, Aesthetic Experience, and Art as the Ideal Embodied Metaphor’, Tim L. Elcombe explores links between sport and art from a pragmatically informed conception of aesthetic experience. However, Elcombe's work does not highlight the role of the imagination in the interpretation of the aesthetic something Michael Polanyi claims to be the ‘cornerstone of aesthetic theory’. With the backdrop of an increased interest in the aesthetics, phenomenology, and epistemology of sport, this discussion essay seeks to defend the (...)
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  • Zhuangzi—Playful Wanderer.Jesús Ilundáin-Agurruza - 2014 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 8 (3):315-342.
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  • 8—Fractured Action—Choking in Sport and its Lessons for Excellence.Jesús Ilundáin-Agurruza - 2014 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 8 (4):420-453.
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