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  1. The Fat of the Land: Linking American Food Overconsumption, Obesity, and Biodiversity Loss. [REVIEW]Philip J. Cafaro, Richard B. Primack & Robert L. Zimdahl - 2006 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 19 (6):541-561.
    Americans’ excessive consumption of food harms their health and quality of life and also causes direct and indirect environmental degradation, through habitat loss and increased pollution from agricultural fertilizers and pesticides. We show here that reducing food consumption could improve Americans’ health and well-being while facilitating environmental benefits ranging from establishing new national parks and protected areas to allowing more earth-friendly farming and ranching techniques. We conclude by considering various public policy initiatives to lower per capita caloric intake and excessive (...)
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  • Scientists and Dutch Pig Farmers in Dialogue About Tail Biting: Unravelling the Mechanism of Multi-Stakeholder Learning. [REVIEW]Marianne Benard, Tjerk Jan Schuitmaker & Tjard de Cock Buning - 2014 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 27 (3):431-452.
    Pig farmers and scientists appear to have different perspectives and underlying framing on animal welfare issues as tail biting and natural behaviour of pigs. Literature proposes a joint learning process in which a shared vision is developed. Using two different settings, a symposium and one-to-one dialogues, we aimed to investigate what elements affected joint learning between scientists and pig farmers. Although both groups agreed that more interaction was important, the process of joint learning appeared to be rather potentially dangerous for (...)
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  • Meeting Consumer Concerns for Food Safety in South Korea: The Importance of Food Safety and Ethics in a Globalizing Market. [REVIEW]Renee B. Kim - 2009 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 22 (2):141-152.
    As the issue of food safety became one of the important public agenda, consumer concern for food safety became the general public concern. The Korea U.S. Free Trade Agreement (KORUS FTA) completion allowing import of U.S. beef to Korea has turned into a massive public uproar and a series of demonstrations, revealing widespread concerns on the part of Korean producers and consumers about government food safety regulations and mishandling of the beef trade requirement. The mishandling of public concerns for BSE (...)
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  • The Paradox of E-Numbers: Ethical, Aesthetic, and Cultural Concerns in the Dutch Discourse on Food Additives. [REVIEW]Dirk Haen - 2014 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 27 (1):27-42.
    Persistent public distrust of food additives is often explained in terms of safety and health issues. The broad variety of ethical, aesthetic, and cultural concerns tends to be structurally ignored by food engineers and occasionally even by consumers themselves. The public controversy of food additives—commonly known as “E-numbers”—in the Netherlands is a case in point. Two discursive mechanisms prevent these concerns from becoming legitimate public issues: irrationalization and privatization. But these consumer concerns may not be as unreasonable as they seem, (...)
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  • Trading "Ethical Preferences" in the Market: Outline of a Politically Liberal Framework for the Ethical Characterization of Foods.A. Michalopoulos, M. J. J. A. A. Korthals & H. Hogeveen - unknown
    The absence of appropriate information about imperceptible and ethical food characteristics limits the opportunities for concerned consumer/ citizens to take ethical issues into account during their inescapable food consumption. It also fuels trust crises between producers and consumers, hinders the optimal embedment of innovative technologies, "punishes" in the market ethical producers, and limits the opportunities for politically liberal democratic governance. This paper outlines a framework for the ethical characterization and subsequent optimization of foods. The framework applies to "imperceptible," "pragmatic," and (...)
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  • The Citizen Goes Shopping : A Framework for the Assessment and Optimization of Production From the Perspective of Society.Tassos Michalopoulos - unknown
    Nowadays, product labels are often used to enable consumers choose products that are friendly to the environment and to animals, natural, healthful and socially responsible. However, certain features of commonly used labels limit their usefulness. This thesis identifies a number of these limitations and presents an innovative labeling approach designed to address them. More specifically, the following features limit the usefulness of the commonly used “endorsement” labels: they offer a single certification grade, the requirements for which are ‘static’ in the (...)
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  • Ethics and Action: A Relational Perspective on Consumer Choice in the European Politics of Food. [REVIEW]Unni Kjærnes - 2012 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (2):145-162.
    The lack of consistency between people’s engagement in ethical issues and their food choices has received considerable attention. Consumption as “choice” dominates this discourse, understood as decision-making at the point of purchase. But ideas concentrating on individual choice are problematic when trying to understand how social and ethical issues emerge and are dealt with in the practices of buying and eating food. I argue in this paper that “consumer choice” is better understood as a political ideology addressing a particular way (...)
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  • Animal Welfare Concerns and Values of Stakeholders Within the Dairy Industry.B. A. Ventura, M. A. G. von Keyserlingk & D. M. Weary - 2015 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 28 (1):109-126.
    This paper describes the perspectives of stakeholders within the North American dairy industry on key issues affecting the welfare of dairy cattle. Five heterogeneous focus groups were held during a dairy cattle welfare meeting in Guelph, Canada in October 2012. Each group contained between 7 and 10 participants and consisted of a mix of dairy producers, veterinarians, academics, students, and dairy industry specialists. The 1-h facilitated discussions were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Content analysis of the resulting transcripts showed that participants (...)
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  • Exploring the Potential of Dutch Pig Farmers and Urban-Citizens to Learn Through Frame Reflection.Marianne Benard & Tjard de Cock Buning - 2013 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 26 (5):1015-1036.
    The Dutch pig husbandry has become a topic of public debate. One underlying cause is that pig farmers and urban-citizens have different perspectives and underlying norms, values and truths on pig husbandry and animal welfare. One way of dealing with such conflicts involves a learning process in which a shared vision is developed. A prerequisite for this process is that both parties become aware of their own fixed patterns of thoughts, actions, and blind spots. Therefore, we conducted five homogeneous focus (...)
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  • Operationalizing Ethics in Food Choice Decisions.Daryl H. Hepting, JoAnn Jaffe & Timothy Maciag - 2014 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 27 (3):453-469.
    There is a large gap between attitude and action when it comes to consumer purchases of ethical food. Amongst the various aspects of this gap, this paper focuses on the difficulty in knowing enough about the various dimensions of food production, distribution and consumption to make an ethical food purchasing decision. There is neither one universal definition of ethical food. We suggest that it is possible to support consumers in operationalizing their own ethics of food with the use of appropriate (...)
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  • Maintaining Trust and Credibility in a Continuously Evolving Organic Food System.Martin Hvarregaard Thorsøe - 2015 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 28 (4):767-787.
    Credibility is particularly important in organic food systems because there are only marginal visual and sensorial differences between organic and conventionally produced products, requiring consumers to trust in producers’ quality claims. In this article I explore what challenges the credibility of organic food systems and I explore how credibility of organic food systems can be maintained, using the Danish organic food system as a case study. The question is increasingly relevant as the sale of organic food is growing in Denmark (...)
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  • WTO, Public Reason and Food Public Reasoning in the 'Trade Conflict' on GM-Food.Frans W. A. Brom - 2004 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 7 (4):417-431.
    Food trade is of economic importance for both developed and developing countries. Food, however, is a special commodity. Firstly, the lack of food -- hunger, under-nourishment, and starvation -- is one of the world's pressing moral problems. But food is not only special because it is necessary for our survival; food is also special because it is strongly related to our social and cultural identity. Two recent transatlantic trade conflicts over food -- over the use of artificial growth hormones in (...)
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  • Trading “Ethical Preferences” in the Market: Outline of a Politically Liberal Framework for the Ethical Characterization of Foods. [REVIEW]Tassos Michalopoulos, Michiel Korthals & Henk Hogeveen - 2008 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 21 (1):3-27.
    The absence of appropriate information about imperceptible and ethical food characteristics limits the opportunities for concerned consumer/citizens to take ethical issues into account during their inescapable food consumption. It also fuels trust crises between producers and consumers, hinders the optimal embedment of innovative technologies, “punishes” in the market ethical producers, and limits the opportunities for politically liberal democratic governance. This paper outlines a framework for the ethical characterization and subsequent optimization of foods (ECHO). The framework applies to “imperceptible,” “pragmatic,” and (...)
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  • Consumer Rights to Informed Choice on the Food Market.Volkert Beekman - 2008 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 11 (1):61-72.
    The discourse about traceability in food chains focused on traceability as means towards the end of managing health risks. This discourse witnessed a call to broaden traceability to accommodate consumer concerns about foods that are not related to health. This call envisions the development of ethical traceability. This paper presents a justification of ethical traceability. The argument is couched in liberal distinctions, since the call for ethical traceability is based on intuitions about consumer rights to informed choice. The paper suggests (...)
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  • Ethics in the Societal Debate on Genetically Modified Organisms: A (Re)Quest for Sense and Sensibility. [REVIEW]Yann Devos, Pieter Maeseele, Dirk Reheul, Linda Van Speybroeck & Danny De Waele - 2008 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 21 (1):29-61.
    Via a historical reconstruction, this paper primarily demonstrates how the societal debate on genetically modified organisms (GMOs) gradually extended in terms of actors involved and concerns reflected. It is argued that the implementation of recombinant DNA technology out of the laboratory and into civil society entailed a “complex of concerns.” In this complex, distinctions between environmental, agricultural, socio-economic, and ethical issues proved to be blurred. This fueled the confusion between the wider debate on genetic modification and the risk assessment of (...)
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  • An Ethical Toolkit for Food Companies: Reflections on its Use. [REVIEW]M. Deblonde, R. de Graaff & F. Brom - 2007 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 20 (1):99-118.
    Nowadays many debates are going on that relate to the agricultural and food sector. It looks as if present technological and organizational developments within the agricultural and food sector are badly geared to societal needs and expectations. In this article we briefly present a toolkit for moral communication within the food chain. This toolkit is developed as part of a European research project. Next, we discuss what such a toolkit can bring about, given the characteristics of the present day agricultural (...)
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  • Farming Ethics in Practice: From Freedom to Professional Moral Autonomy for Farmers.Franck L. B. Meijboom & Frans R. Stafleu - 2016 - Agriculture and Human Values 33 (2):403-414.
    Food production, water management, land use, and animal and public health are all topics of extensive public debate. These themes are linked to the core activities of the agricultural sector, and more specifically to the work of farmers. Nonetheless, the ethical discussions are mostly initiated by interest groups in society rather than by farmers. At least in Europe, consumer organizations and animal welfare and environmental organizations are more present in the public debate than farmers. This is not how it should (...)
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  • Moral Values and Attitudes Toward Dutch Sow Husbandry.Tamara J. Bergstra, Bart Gremmen & Elsbeth N. Stassen - 2015 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 28 (2):375-401.
    Attitudes toward sow husbandry differ between citizens and conventional pig farmers. Research showed that moral values could only predict the judgment of people in case of culling healthy animals in the course of a disease epidemic to a certain extent. Therefore, we hypothesized that attitudes of citizens and pig farmers cannot be predicted one-on-one by moral values. Furthermore, we were interested in getting insight in whether moral values can be useful in bridging the gap between attitudes toward sow husbandry of (...)
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  • Seven Samurai to Protect “Our” Food: The Reform of the Food Safety Regulatory System in Japan After the BSE Crisis of 2001. [REVIEW]Keiko Tanaka - 2008 - Agriculture and Human Values 25 (4):567-580.
    Using the case of food safety governance reform in Japan between 2001 and 2003, this paper examines the relationship between science and trust. The paper explains how the discovery of the first BSE positive cow and consequent food safety scandals in 2001 politicized the role of science in protecting the safety of the food supply. The analysis of the Parliamentary debate focuses on the contestation among legislators and other participants over three dimensions of risk science, including “knowledge,” “objects,” and “beneficiaries.” (...)
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