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  1. “Punishing Violent Thoughts: Islamic Dissent and Thoreauvian Disobedience in Post-9/11 America,”.Rebecca Gould - 2017 - Journal of American Studies:online first.
    American Muslims increasingly negotiate their relation to a government that is suspicious of Islam, yet which is legally obligated to recognize them as rights-bearing citizens. To better understand how the post-9/11 state is reshaping American Islam, I examine the case of Muslim American dissident Tarek Mehanna, sentenced to seventeen years in prison for providing material support for terrorism, on the basis of his controversial words (USA v. Mehanna et al, 2012). I situate Mehanna’s writing and reflections within a long history (...)
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  • Reviving Greco‐Roman Friendship: A Bibliographical Review.Heather Devere - 1999 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 2 (4):149-187.
  • Diotima and Demeter as Mystagogues in Plato'sSymposium.Nancy Evans - 2006 - Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy 21 (2):1-27.
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  • The Unacknowledged Socrates in the Works of Luce Irigaray.Shaun O'Dwyer - 2006 - Hypatia 21 (2):28-44.
    : In Luce Irigaray's thought, Socrates is a marginal figure compared to Plato or Hegel. However, she does identify the Socratic dialectical position as that of a 'phallocrat' and she does conflate Socratic and Platonic philosophy in her psychoanalytic reading of Plato in Speculum of the Other Woman. In this essay, I critically interpret both Irigaray's own texts and the Platonic dialogues in order to argue that: (1) the Socratic dialectical position is not 'phallocratic' by Irigaray's own understanding of the (...)
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  • Diotima and Demeter as Mystagogues in Plato's.Nancy Evans - 2006 - Hypatia 21 (2):1 - 27.
    : Like the goddess Demeter, Diotima from Mantineia, the prophetess who teaches Socrates about eros and the "rites of love" in Plato's Symposium, was a mystagogue who initiated individuals into her mysteries, mediating to humans esoteric knowledge of the divine. The dialogue, including Diotima's speech, contains religious and mystical language, some of which specifically evokes the female-centered yearly celebrations of Demeter at Eleusis. In this essay, I contextualize the worship of Demeter within the larger system of classical Athenian practices, and (...)
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