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Allen Buchanan (1996). Choosing Who Will Be Disabled: Genetic Intervention and the Morality of Inclusion.

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  1.  18
    Genome Editing and Assisted Reproduction: Curing Embryos, Society or Prospective Parents?Giulia Cavaliere - 2018 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 21 (2):215-225.
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  2.  23
    Queerin' the PGD Clinic.Robert Sparrow - 2013 - Journal of Medical Humanities 34 (2):177-196.
    Disability activists influenced by queer theory and advocates of “human enhancement” have each disputed the idea that what is “normal” is normatively significant, which currently plays a key role in the regulation of pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD). Previously, I have argued that the only way to avoid the implication that parents have strong reasons to select children of one sex (most plausibly, female) over the other is to affirm the moral significance of sexually dimorphic human biological norms. After outlining the (...)
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  3.  28
    Redefining Disability: Maleficent, Unjust and Inconsistent.B. Cox-White & S. F. Boxall - 2008 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 33 (6):558-576.
    Disability activists' redefinition of “disability” as a social, rather than a medical, problem attempts to reassign causality. We explicate the untenable implications of this approach and argue this definition is maleficent, unjust, and inconsistent. Thus, redefining disability as a socially caused phenomenon is, from a moral point of view, ill-advised.
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  4.  14
    Response.Madelyn M. Peterson - 2008 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 5 (2-3):223-224.
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    Book Review: Erik Parens and Adrienne Asch. Prenatal Testing: A Review Ofprenatal Testing and Disability Rights,Washington, D.C.: Georgetown University Press, 2000; and Rayna Rapp.Testing Women, Testing the Fetus: The Social Impact of Amniocentesis in America. [REVIEW]Mary B. Mahowald - 2004 - Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy 19 (3):216-221.
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  6.  13
    Book Review: Erik Parens and Adrienne Asch. Prenatal Testing: A Review of Prenatal Testing and Disability Rights, Washington, D.C.: Georgetown University Press, 2000; and Rayna Rapp. Testing Women, Testing the Fetus: The Social Impact of Amniocentesis in America. [REVIEW]Mary B. Mahowald - 2004 - Hypatia 19 (3):216-221.
  7.  12
    Live and Let Die? Disability in Bioethics.Simo Vehmas - 2003 - New Review of Bioethics 1 (1):145-157.
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  8.  29
    Prenatal Diagnosis and Discrimination Against the Disabled.L. Gillam - 1999 - Journal of Medical Ethics 25 (2):163-171.
    Two versions of the argument that prenatal diagnosis discriminates against the disabled are distinguished and analysed. Both are shown to be inadequate, but some valid concerns about the social effects of prenatal diagnosis are highlighted.
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