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Allen Buchanan (1996). Perfecting Imperfect Duties: Collective Action to Create Moral Obligations.

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  1.  8
    Individual Actions and Corporate Moral Responsibility: A Kantian Approach.Tobey Scharding - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 154 (4):929-942.
    This paper examines the resources of Kantian ethics to establish corporate moral responsibility. I defend Matthew Altman’s claim that Kantian ethics cannot hold corporations morally responsible for corporate malfeasance. Rather than following Altman in interpreting this inability as a reason not to use Kantian ethics, however, I argue that the Kantian framework is correct: business ethicists should not seek to hold corporations morally responsible. Instead, they should use Kantian resources to criticize the actions of individual businesspeople. I set forth a (...)
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  2.  9
    Past Trends and Future Directions in Business Ethics and Corporate Responsibility Scholarship.Denis G. Arnold, Kenneth E. Goodpaster & Gary R. Weaver - 2015 - Business Ethics Quarterly 25 (4):v-xv.
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  3.  12
    Unlocking the Beauty of the Imperfect Duty to Aid: Sen's Idea of the Duty of Assistance.Susan Murphy - 2014 - Journal of Global Ethics 10 (3):369-383.
    This paper examines the links between acting upon a duty to assist, responsibility for these actions, and how such actions link with incremental moral duties that can amass as a consequence of such action. More specifically, this paper is concerned with practices of international aid and assistance, whereby public and privately funded donations enable the actions of parties outside of the territorial and jurisdictional boundaries of a community and state to directly influence the functioning of that community, and the incremental (...)
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  4.  35
    Vulnerability and the Basis of Business Ethics: From Fiduciary Duties to Professionalism. [REVIEW]Eric Brown - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 113 (3):489-504.
    This paper examines the role of vulnerability in the basis of business ethics by criticizing its role in giving a moral substantial character to fiduciary duties to shareholders. The target is Marcoux’s (Bus Ethics Q 13(1):1–24, 2003) argument for morally substantial fiduciary duties vis-à-vis the multifiduciary stakeholder theory. Rather than proceed to support the stakeholder paradigm, a conception of vulnerability is combined with Heath’s 2004) “market failure” view of the ethical obligations of managers as falling out of their roles as (...)
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  5.  27
    The Political Obligation To Donate Organs.Govert Den Hartogh - 2013 - Ratio Juris 26 (3):378-403.
    The first question I discuss in this paper is whether we have a duty of rescue to make our organs available for transplantation after our death, a duty we owe to patients suffering from organ failure. The second question is whether political obligations, in particular the obligation to obey the law, can be derived from natural duties, possibly duties of beneficence. Such duties are normally seen as merely imperfect duties, not owed to anyone. The duty of rescue, however, is a (...)
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  6.  42
    Human Rights in the Void? Due Diligence in the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights.Björn Fasterling & Geert Demuijnck - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 116 (4):799-814.
    The ‘Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights’ (Principles) that provide guidance for the implementation of the United Nations’ ‘Protect, Respect and Remedy’ framework (Framework) will probably succeed in making human rights matters more customary in corporate management procedures. They are likely to contribute to higher levels of accountability and awareness within corporations in respect of the negative impact of business activities on human rights. However, we identify tensions between the idea that the respect of human rights is a perfect (...)
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  7.  26
    Communal Ties and Political Obligations.Dorota Mokrosinska - 2013 - Ratio Juris 26 (2):187-214.
    The associative argument for political obligation has taken an important place in the debate on political obligation. Proponents of this view argue that an obligation to obey the government arises out of ties of affiliation among individuals who share the same citizenship. According to them, relationships between compatriots constitute basic reasons for action in the same way in which relationships between family members or friends do. As critics point out, this account of the normative force of relationships has counterintuitive implications: (...)
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  8.  61
    Imperfect Duties and Corporate Philanthropy: A Kantian Approach.David E. Ohreen & Roger A. Petry - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 106 (3):367-381.
    Nonprofit organizations play a crucial role in society. Unfortunately, many such organizations are chronically underfunded and struggle to meet their objectives. These facts have significant implications for corporate philanthropy and Kant’s notion of imperfect duties. Under the concept of imperfect duties, businesses would have wide discretion regarding which charities receive donations, how much money to give, and when such donations take place. A perceived problem with imperfect duties is that they can lead to moral laxity; that is, a failure on (...)
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  9.  54
    A Typology of Moral Problems in Business: A Framework for Ethical Management.Aviva Geva - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 69 (2):133-147.
    This paper develops a typology of moral problems in business. The cross-classification of two fundamental dimensions of ethical conduct: judgment and motivation, is employed to distinguish four types of moral problems: genuine dilemmas, compliance problems, moral laxity, and no-problem problems. Actual cases are brought to illustrate each type of problem, and corresponding coping strategies are presented. The paper highlights the need to design a dynamic strategy that will take into account the relationships among different types of ethical problems. In its (...)
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  10.  26
    Mentoring and Ethical Beliefs in Graduate Education in Science.Rachelle D. Hollander - 2001 - Science and Engineering Ethics 7 (4):521-524.
  11.  1
    Mentoring: Some Ethical Considerations. [REVIEW]Dr Vivian Weil - 2001 - Science and Engineering Ethics 7 (4):471-482.
    To counter confusion about the term ‘mentor’, and address concerns about the scarcity of mentoring, I argue for an “honorific” definition, according to which a mentor is virtuous like a saint or hero. Given the unbounded commitment of mentors, mentoring relationships must be voluntary. In contrast, the role of advisor can be specified, mandated, and monitored. I argue that departments and research groups have a moral responsibility to devise a system of roles and structures to meet graduate students’ and postdoctoral (...)
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  12.  15
    Mentoring: Some Ethical Considerations.Vivian Weil - 2001 - Science and Engineering Ethics 7 (4):471-482.
    To counter confusion about the term ‘mentor’, and address concerns about the scarcity of mentoring, I argue for an “honorific” definition, according to which a mentor is virtuous like a saint or hero. Given the unbounded commitment of mentors, mentoring relationships must be voluntary. In contrast, the role of advisor can be specified, mandated, and monitored. I argue that departments and research groups have a moral responsibility to devise a system of roles and structures to meet graduate students’ and postdoctoral (...)
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