Citations of work:

Allen Buchanan (2000). Rawls's Law of Peoples: Rules for a Vanished Westphalian World.

40 found
Order:
Are we missing citations?

PhilPapers citations & references are currently in beta testing. We expect to add many more in the future.

Meanwhile, you can use our bibliography tool to import references for this or another work.

Or you can directly add citations for the above work:

Search for work by author name and title
Add directly by record ID

  1.  6
    Global Cities, Global Justice?Loren King & Michael Blake - forthcoming - Journal of Global Ethics:1-21.
    The global city is a contested site of economic innovation and cultural production, as well as profound inequalities of wealth and life chances. These cities, and large cities that aspire to ‘global’ status, are often the point of entry for new immigrants. Yet for political theorists (and indeed many scholars of global institutions), these critical sites of global influence and inequality have not been a significant focus of attention. This is curious. Theorists have wrestled with the nature and demands of (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  1
    Rawls’s Duty of Assistance and Relative Deprivation: Why Less is More and More is Even More.Jan Niklas Rolf - forthcoming - Journal of International Political Theory.
    John Rawls’s case for a duty of assistance is partially premised on the assumption that liberal societies have an interest in assisting burdened societies to become well-ordered: Not only are well-ordered peoples inherently peaceful, but negative spillover effects would also disappear where peoples have a just or decent institutional order. Drawing on relative deprivation theory, this article argues that the kind of limited assistance that Rawls proposes to help burdened societies to become well-ordered would not reduce but actually increase international (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  11
    Neoliberalism Versus Distributional Autonomy: The Skipped Step in Rawls’s the Law of Peoples.William A. Edmundson & Matthew R. Schrepfer - 2018 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 49 (2):169-181.
    ABSTRACTDebates about global distributive justice focus on the gulf between the wealthy North and the impoverished South, rather than on issues arising between liberal democracies. A review of John Rawls’s approach to international justice discloses a step Rawls skipped in his extension of his original-position procedure. The skipped step is where a need for the distributional autonomy of sovereign liberal states reveals itself. Neoliberalism denies the possibility and the desirability of distributional autonomy. A complete Rawlsian account of global justice shows (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  9
    Frontiers of Responsibility for Global Justice.Mathilde Unger & Juliette Roussin - 2018 - Journal of Social Philosophy 49 (3):381-392.
  5.  2
    Classifying States: Instrumental Rhetoric or a Compelling Normative Theory?Mathew Coakley & Pietro Maffettone - 2017 - Ethics and Global Politics 10 (1):58-76.
  6.  4
    A concepção de direitos humanos e fundamentais na teoria da justiça como equidade.Guilherme de Oliveira Feldens & Ângela Kretschmann - 2017 - Trans/Form/Ação 40 (4):187-208.
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  11
    Global Duties in the Face of Uncertainty.Sylvie Loriaux - 2017 - Diametros 53:75-95.
    This paper aims to highlight the role played by uncertainties in global justice theories. It will start by identifying four kinds of uncertainties that could potentially have an impact on the nature, content and very existence of global duties: first, uncertainties regarding the causes of global injustices; second, uncertainties regarding the consequences of global justice initiatives; third, uncertainties pertaining to the 'imperfect' character of certain global duties; and fourth, uncertainties regarding the conduct of others. It will discuss each of these (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  3
    Justice and International Trade.de Bres Helena - 2016 - Philosophy Compass 11 (10):570-579.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  8
    Benevolent Absolutisms, Incentives and Rawls’ The Law of Peoples.Pietro Maffettone - 2016 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 15 (4):379-404.
    Rawls’ The Law of Peoples does not offer a clear principled account of the way in which liberal and decent peoples should deal with benevolent absolutisms. Within the Rawlsian framework, benevolent absolutisms are a type of society that respects basic human rights and is not externally aggressive. Rawls rules out the use of coercion to engage with benevolent absolutisms but does not provide an alternative strategy. The article develops one, namely, it argues that liberal and decent peoples should use positive (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  26
    When Liberal Peoples Turn Into Outlaw States: John Rawls’Law of Peoplesand Liberal Nuclearism.T. E. Doyle - 2015 - Journal of International Political Theory 11 (2):257-273.
    John Rawls’ account in Law of Peoples of a realist utopia composed of a society of liberal and decent peoples is a stark contrast to his description of “outlaw states,” which seek to undermine the legal and moral frameworks that constitute a pacific global order. Rawls argues that outlaw states cannot conceive of political accommodation with their external enemies; instead, they opt for the rule of force, terror, and brutality. Rawls even urges that liberal peoples are justified in maintaining a (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  11.  19
    In Defense of the Duty to Assist: A Response to Critics on the Viability of a Rawlsian Approach to Climate Change.Sarah Kenehan - 2015 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 18 (3):308-327.
  12.  52
    Secession of the Rich: A Qualified Defence.F. Dietrich - 2014 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 13 (1):62-81.
    The secession of prosperous regions may negatively affect the redistributive scheme of an established state. As a consequence, the capacity of its welfare system to support the inhabitants of poorer regions may be significantly reduced. Some authors assert that affluent groups who opt for full political independence violate duties of solidarity. This objection to the secession of prosperous regions can be based on different views of distributive justice. Here, following a distinction that has been introduced by Allen Buchanan, ‘subject centred’ (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13.  68
    Contemporary Cosmopolitanism: Some Current Issues.Gillian Brock - 2013 - Philosophy Compass 8 (8):689-698.
    In this article, we survey some current debates among cosmopolitans and their critics. We begin by surveying some distinctions typically drawn among kinds of cosmopolitanisms, before canvassing some of the diverse varieties of cosmopolitan justice, exploring positions on the content of cosmopolitan duties of justice, and a prominent debate between cosmopolitans and defenders of statist accounts of global justice. We then explore some common concerns about cosmopolitanism – such as whether cosmopolitan commitments are necessarily in tension with other affiliations people (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  14.  20
    Do Rawls's Theories of Justice Fit Together? A Reply to Pogge.Jeffrey Bercuson - 2012 - Journal of Global Ethics 8 (2-3):251-267.
    In my reply to Pogge's critique of Rawls's international relations theory, I will try to show two things: (1) that Pogge's account of the public criterion of domestic social justice endorsed by Rawls is a partial one and (2) that this leads him to wrongly postulate a significant asymmetry between Rawls's domestic and international theories of justice. In the end, I hope to show that the domestic and international accounts are characterized by a significant degree of symmetry ? that both (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15.  24
    Comparative Vs. Transcendental Approaches to Justice: A Misleading Dichotomy in Sen'sThe Idea of Justice.Francesco Biondo - 2012 - Ratio Juris 25 (4):555-577.
    This paper examines the distinction drawn by Amartya Sen between transcendental and comparative theories of justice, and its application to Rawls' doctrine. It then puts forward three arguments. First, it is argued that Sen offers a limited portrayal of Rawls' doctrine. This is the result of a rhetorical strategy that depicts Rawlsian doctrine as more “transcendental” than it really is. Although Sen deploys numerous quotations in support of his interpretation, it is possible to offer a less transcendental interpretation of Rawls. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16.  83
    Justifying Feasibility Constraints on Human Rights.Henning Hahn - 2012 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 15 (2):143-157.
    It is a crucial question whether practicalities should have an impact in developing an applicable theory of human rights—and if, how (far) such constraints can be justified. In the course of the non-ideal turn of today’s political philosophy, any entitlements (and social entitlements in particular) stand under the proviso of practical feasibility. It would, after all, be unreasonable to demand something which is, under the given political and economic circumstances, unachievable. Thus, many theorist—particularly those belonging to the liberal camp—begin to (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17.  28
    Global Public Power: Thesubjectof Principles of Global Political Legitimacy.Andrew Hurrell & Terry Macdonald - 2012 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 15 (5):553-571.
    This paper elaborates the concept of global public power as the subject of principles of political legitimacy in global politics, and defends it through a critical comparison with other concepts widely employed to depict this regulative subject: states, global basic structure, and global governance. The goal underlying this argument is to bring some greater unity and integration to conceptual understandings of the subject of principles of political legitimacy within analyses of global politics, and in doing so to frame a broader (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  18. Rawls, Reasonableness, and International Toleration.T. Porter - 2012 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 11 (4):382-414.
    Rawls’s account of international toleration in The Law of Peoples has been the subject of vigorous critiques by critics who believe that he unacceptably dilutes the principles of his Law of Peoples in order to accommodate non-liberal societies. One important component in these critiques takes issue specifically with Rawls’s inclusion of certain non-liberal societies (‘decent peoples’) in the constituency of justification for the Law of Peoples. In Rawls’s defence, I argue that the explanation for the inclusion of decent peoples in (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  19.  29
    Global Health Justice and Governance.Jennifer Prah Ruger - 2012 - American Journal of Bioethics 12 (12):35-54.
    While there is a growing body of work on moral issues and global governance in the fields of global justice and international relations, little work has connected principles of global health justice with those of global health governance for a theory of global health. Such a theory would enable analysis and evaluation of the current global health system and would ethically and empirically ground proposals for reforming it to more closely align with moral values. Global health governance has been framed (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  20.  32
    Reinterpreting Rawls's the Law of Peoples.Christopher Heath Wellman - 2012 - Social Philosophy and Policy 29 (1):213-232.
    In this article I argue that critics of John Rawls's The Law of Peoples wrongly presume that Rawls sought to offer a comprehensive theory of global justice, when he meant more minimally to respond to a specific practical problem: I concede that my reading is not uniformly supported by all aspects of the text, but The Law of Peoples is a rich and complex work that does not univocally recommend any single reading, and my construal squares with Rawls's own description (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21.  53
    Citizenship, Egalitarianism and Global Justice.Chris Armstrong - 2011 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 14 (5):603-621.
    Many of the foremost defenders of distributive egalitarianism hold that its scope should be limited to co-citizens. But this bracketing of distributive equality exclusively to citizens turns out to be very difficult to defend. Pressure is placed on it, for instance, when we recognize its vulnerability to ?extension arguments? which attempt to cast the net of egalitarian concern more widely. The paper rehearses those arguments and also examines some ? ultimately unsuccessful ? responses which ?citizenship egalitarians? might make. If it (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  22.  65
    Human Rights and Toleration in Rawls.Mitch Avila - 2011 - Human Rights Review 12 (1):1-14.
    In a Society of Peoples as Rawls conceives it, human rights function as “criteria for toleration.” This paper defends the conception of human rights that appears in Rawls’ The Law of Peoples as normatively and theoretically adequate. I claim that human rights function as criteria for determining whether or not a given society or legal system can be tolerated. As such, “human rights” are not themselves basic facts or judgments or ascriptions, but rather the means by which we collectively attempt (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  23.  28
    Global Migratory Potential and the Scope of Justice.R. Child - 2011 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 10 (3):282-300.
    We live in an era of global migratory potential — a time when a vast number of people have the physical capacity to move relatively quickly and easily between states. In this article, I use this fact to motivate a powerful objection to ‘statism’, the view that the egalitarian principles of justice which apply to citizens have no application outside the boundaries of the state. I argue that, in a world characterized by global migratory potential, the supposed contrast between the (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  24.  5
    The Law of Peoples: Beyond Incoherence and Apology.Pietro Maffettone - 2011 - Journal of International Political Theory 7 (2):190-211.
    The essay provides a reconstruction of Rawls's The Law of Peoples that makes sense of three main discontinuities between Rawls's domestic theory of justice and his international outlook, namely the absence in the latter of: a) individualism, b) egalitarianism, and c) structural justice. The essay argues that while we can make sense of such differences without charging Rawls's account of blatant inconsistency, we can nonetheless criticize such an outlook from an internal perspective. There is a middle way between claiming that (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25. Global Egalitarianism.Chris Armstrong - 2009 - Philosophy Compass 4 (1):155-171.
    To whom is egalitarian justice owed? Our fellow citizens, or all of humankind? If the latter, what form might a global brand of egalitarianism take? This paper examines some recent debates about the justification, and content, of global egalitarian justice. It provides an account of some keenly argued controversies about the scope of egalitarian justice, between those who would restrict it to the level of the state and those who would extend it more widely. It also notes the cross-cutting distinction (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  26.  48
    Citizenship and the State.M. Victoria Costa - 2009 - Philosophy Compass 4 (6):987-997.
    This study surveys debates on citizenship, the state, and the bases of political stability. The survey begins by presenting the primary sense of 'citizenship' as a legal status and the question of the sorts of political communities people can belong to as citizens. (Multi)nation-states are suggested as the main site of citizenship in the contemporary world, without ignoring the existence of alternative possibilities. Turning to discussions of citizen identity, the study shows that some of the discussion is motivated by a (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  27. The Wto and the Limits of Distributive Justice.Pietro Maffettone - 2009 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 35 (3):243-267.
    In this article I rethink Rawls' conception of international economic justice, with a particular focus on international trade. I ground my normative argument on a different interpretation of the concepts of basic structure and of basic institution. I use the contemporary international trading system to illustrate my normative interpretation. I use the Law of Peoples to discuss the Rawlsian concept of basic structure. I contest Samuel Freeman's interpretation of this concept as one that pertains exclusively to the domestic realm. As (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  28.  51
    No Justice Without Democracy: A Deliberative Approach to the Global Distribution of Wealth.Stefan Rummens - 2009 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 17 (5):657-680.
    The debate about global distributive justice is characterized by an often stark opposition between universalistic approaches, advocating an egalitarian global redistribution of wealth (Beitz, Pogge, Barry, Tan), and particularistic positions, aiming to justify a restriction of redistribution to the domestic community (D. Miller, R. Miller, Blake, Nagel, Rawls). I argue that an approach starting from the deliberative model of democracy (Habermas) can overcome this opposition. On the one hand, the increasingly global scope of economic interactions implies that the range of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  29.  55
    Multilateral Democracy: The "Original Position".Francis Cheneval - 2008 - Journal of Social Philosophy 39 (1):42–61.
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30.  28
    The Linguistic Territoriality Principle — a Critique.Helder de Schutter - 2008 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 25 (2):105–120.
    In this essay, I develop a critique of the linguistic territoriality principle, which states that, for reasons related to the value of language identity, language groups should be territorially accommodated. While I acknowledge the desirability of implementing a linguistic territoriality principle in some specific cases, I claim that this principle is in general inappropriate for the 'post-Westphalian' linguistic world in which we live. I identify, analyze and reject two distinct justifications for the linguistic territoriality principle: the Linguistic Context justification and (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  31. Collective Responsibility and National Responsibility.Roland Pierik - 2008 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 11 (4):465-483.
    In his recent book, National responsibility and global justice, David Miller conceptualizes and justifies a model of national responsibility. His conceptualization proceeds in two steps: he starts by developing two models of collective responsibility, the like?minded group model and the cooperative practice model. He then proceeds to discuss national responsibility, a species of collective responsibility, and argues that nations have features such that the two models of collective responsibility also apply to them. In this article I focus on the question (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  32.  10
    The Classical Cosmopolitanian Idea: Arguments for the World Government.Dusko Prelevic - 2008 - Filozofija I Društvo 19 (2):161-189.
    The Cosmopolitan idea of the World Government is quite rarely proposed in theory of international relations. Kant already claimed that this idea oscillates between anarchy and brute despotism. This is the reason why he described this standpoint as naive. The author tries to show that alternative theories, such as realism, Kantian and Rawlsian versions of statism and the conception of multilayered scheme of sovereignty, lead to more serious problems. The first one is rejected for the reason of the 'prisoner's dilemma' (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33.  31
    Tolerating Nonliberal States: Human Rights as a Grounding Principle?Cristian Lupu - 2007 - Journal of Global Ethics 3 (2):223 – 235.
    In this paper, I examine to what extent can a more or less uncontroversial list of human rights ground a liberal notion of toleration that would have as its object nonliberal states. Although it is sometimes taken for granted that respect for human rights should draw the limits of toleration, I argue that the Rawlsian argument for it does not fully work. More exactly, I defend the idea that, although he tries to warrant positive toleration for non-liberal peoples, the concept (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34.  33
    Decent Democratic Centralism.Stephen C. Angle - 2005 - Political Theory 33 (4):518-546.
    Are there any coherent and defensible alternatives to liberal democracy? The author examines the possibility that a reformed democratic centralism-the principle around which China's current polity is officially organized-might be legitimate, according to both an inside and an outside perspective. The inside perspective builds on contemporary Chinese political theory; the outside perspective critically deploys Rawls's notion ofa "decent society " as its standard. Along the way, the author pays particular attention to the kinds and degree of pluralism a decent society (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  35.  24
    Human Rights and the Global Original Position Argument in the Law of Peoples.M. Victoria Costa - 2005 - Journal of Social Philosophy 36 (1):49–61.
  36.  13
    Forced to Be Free: Rethinking J. S. Mill and Intervention.J. Joseph Miller - 2005 - Politics and Ethics Review 1 (2):119-137.
  37.  5
    Flawed Attacks on Contemporary Human Rights: Laudan, Sunstein, and the Cost-Benefit State. [REVIEW]Kristin Shrader-Frechette - 2005 - Human Rights Review 7 (1):92-110.
    After giving a brief account of human rights, the paper investigates five contemporary attacks on them. All of the attacks come from two contemporary proponents of the cost-benefit state, attorney Cass Sunstein and philosopher Larry Laudan. These attacks may be called, respectively, the rationality, objectivity, permission, voluntariness, and comparativism claims. Laudan's and Sunstein's rationality claim (RC) ist that only policy decisions passing cost-benefit tests are rational. Their objectivity presupposition (OP) is that only acute, deterministic threats to life are objective. Sunstein’s (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  38.  31
    Global Justice Without End?John Tasioulas - 2005 - Metaphilosophy 36 (1‐2):3-29.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  39.  4
    Locating Cosmopolitanism.Z. Skrbis - 2004 - Theory, Culture and Society 21 (6):115-136.
    The emerging interdisciplinary body of cosmopolitanism research has established a promising field of theoretical endeavour by bringing into focus questions concerning globalization, nationalism, population movements, cultural values and identity. Yet, despite its potential importance, what characterizes recent cosmopolitanism research is an idealist sentiment that considerably marginalizes the significance of the structures of nation-state and citizenship, while leaving unspecified the empirical sociological dimensions of cosmopolitanism itself. Our critique aims at making cosmopolitanism a more productive analytical tool. We argue for a cosmopolitanism (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  40.  67
    From 'Perpetual Peace' to 'the Law of Peoples': Kant, Habermas and Rawls on International Relations.T. Mertens - 2002 - Kantian Review 6:60-84.
    It is hardly surprising that the two greatest Kantian philosophers of the twentieth century's second half would, at some point of time, reflect and comment on one of the most famous writings of the Königsberg sage, namely on Perpetual Peace: A Philosophical Sketch. Of course, in recent decades, and especially around the celebration of the 200th anniversary of its publication, many commentary articles and books have been published on Kant's little essay, but it makes a difference when Jürgen Habermas and (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation