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  1. Empathy, honour, and the apprenticeship of violence: rudiments of a psychohistorical critique of the individualistic science of evil.Nicolas J. Bullot - 2020 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 19 (4):821-845.
    Research seeking to explain the perpetration of violence and atrocities by humans against other humans offers both social and individualistic explanations, which differ namely in the roles attributed to empathy. Prominent social models suggest that some manifestations of inter-human violence are caused by parochial attitudes and obedience reinforced by within-group empathy. Individualistic explanations of violence, by contrast, posit that stable intra-individual characteristics of the brain and personality of some individuals lead them to commit violence and atrocities. An individualistic explanation argues (...)
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  • The Art Experience.Kate McCallum, Scott Mitchell & Thom Scott-Phillips - 2020 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 11 (1):21-35.
    Art theory has consistently emphasised the importance of situational, cultural, institutional and historical factors in viewers’ experience of fine art. However, the link between this heavily context-dependent interpretation and the workings of the mind is often left unexamined. Drawing on relevance theory—a prominent, cogent and productive body of work in cognitive pragmatics—we here argue that fine art achieves its effects by prompting the use of cognitive processes that are more commonly employed in the interpretation of words and other stimuli presented (...)
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  • History and Intentions in the Experience of Artworks.Alessandro Pignocchi - 2014 - Topoi 33 (2):477-486.
    The role of personal background knowledge--in particular knowledge about the context of production of an artwork--has been only marginally taken into account in cognitive approaches to art. Addressing this issue is crucial to enhancing these approaches' explanatory power and framing their collaboration with the humanities (Bullot and Reber, in press). This paper sketches a model of the experience of artworks based on the mechanisms of intention attribution, and shows how this model makes it possible to address the issue of personal (...)
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  • Empathy-Related Responses to Depicted People in Art Works.Ladislav Kesner & Jiří Horáček - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
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  • IV—Aesthetic Experience as a Metacognitive Feeling? A Dual-Aspect View.Jérôme Dokic - 2016 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 116 (1):69-88.
  • Experimental Philosophy of Aesthetics.Florian Cova, Amanda Garcia & Shen-yi Liao - 2015 - Philosophy Compass 10 (12):927-939.
    In the past decade, experimental philosophy---the attempt at making progress on philosophical problems using empirical methods---has thrived in a wide range of domains. However, only in recent years has aesthetics succeeded in drawing the attention of experimental philosophers. The present paper constitutes the first survey of these works and of the nascent field of 'experimental philosophy of aesthetics'. We present both recent experimental works by philosophers on topics such as the ontology of aesthetics, aesthetic epistemology, aesthetic concepts, and imagination, as (...)
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  • Genre Moderates Morality’s Influence on Aesthetics.Shen-yi Liao - manuscript
    The present studies investigate morality’s influence on aesthetics and one potential moderator of that influence: genre. Study 1 finds that people’s moral evaluation positively influence their aesthetic evaluation of an artwork. Study 2 and 3 finds that this influence can be moderated by the contextual factor of genre. These results broaden our understanding of the relationship between morality and aesthetics, and suggest that models of art appreciation should take into account morality and its interaction with context. [Unpublishable 2010-2017.].
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  • Are Artworks More Like People Than Artifacts? Individual Concepts and Their Extensions.George E. Newman, Daniel M. Bartels & Rosanna K. Smith - 2014 - Topics in Cognitive Science 6 (4):647-662.
    This paper examines people's reasoning about identity continuity and its relation to previous research on how people value one-of-a-kind artifacts, such as artwork. We propose that judgments about the continuity of artworks are related to judgments about the continuity of individual persons because art objects are seen as physical extensions of their creators. We report a reanalysis of previous data and the results of two new empirical studies that test this hypothesis. The first study demonstrates that the mere categorization of (...)
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  • Do I Really Feel It? The Contributions of Subjective Fluency and Compatibility in Low-Level Effects on Aesthetic Appreciation.Michael Forster, Wolfgang Fabi & Helmut Leder - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  • Combining Universal Beauty and Cultural Context in a Unifying Model of Visual Aesthetic Experience.Christoph Redies - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  • The Ambiguity of Artworks –A Guideline for Empirical Aesthetics Research with Artworks as Stimuli.Gregor U. Hayn-Leichsenring - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
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  • Dreaming and Neuroesthetics.Umberto Barcaro & Marco Paoli - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  • Your Brain on Art: Emergent Cortical Dynamics During Aesthetic Experiences.Kimberly L. Kontson, Murad Megjhani, Justin A. Brantley, Jesus G. Cruz-Garza, Sho Nakagome, Dario Robleto, Michelle White, Eugene Civillico & Jose L. Contreras-Vidal - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  • Crossing Boundaries: Toward a General Model of Neuroaesthetics.Manuela M. Marin - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  • In Search of the Ontological Common Core of Artworks: Radical Embodiment and Non-Universalization.Gianluca Consoli - 2016 - Estetika 53 (1):14-41.
    I propose that artworks represent a specific and homogeneous ontological kind, grounded in a common ontological core. I call this common core ‘non-universalizable embodied meaning’, and I argue that this common core explains how artworks unfold their ontological identity at the physical, intentional, and social levels on the basis of an original and irreducible mode of material embodiment and cultural emergence; this common core functions as the constitutive rule of art and institutes an axiological normativity, that is, normativity based on (...)
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  • How Children’s Mentalistic Theory Widens Their Conception of Pictorial Possibilities.Gabriella M. Gilli, Simona Ruggi, Monica Gatti & Norman H. Freeman - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  • Constituents of Music and Visual-Art Related Pleasure – A Critical Integrative Literature Review.Marianne Tiihonen, Elvira Brattico, Johanna Maksimainen, Jan Wikgren & Suvi Saarikallio - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
  • What Is Art Good For? The Socio-Epistemic Value of Art.Aleksandra Sherman & Clair Morrissey - 2017 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 11.
    Scientists, humanists, and art lovers alike value art not just for its beauty, but also for its social and epistemic importance; that is, for its communicative nature, its capacity to increase one's self-knowledge and encourage personal growth, and its ability to challenge our schemas and preconceptions. However, empirical research tends to discount the importance of such social and epistemic outcomes of art engagement, instead focusing on individuals' preferences, judgments of beauty, pleasure, or other emotional appraisals as the primary outcomes of (...)
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  • Owning Up to the Role of Historical Information.Nicholaus S. Noles & Judith H. Danovitch - 2014 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 37 (5):497-498.
    Although the inherence heuristic is a versatile cognitive process that addresses a wide range of psychological phenomena, we propose that ownership information represents an important test case for evaluating both the boundaries of Cimpian & Salomon's model and its effectiveness as a mechanism for explaining psychological essentialism.
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  • Artifacts and Essentialism.Susan A. Gelman - 2013 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 4 (3):449-463.
    Psychological essentialism is an intuitive folk belief positing that certain categories have a non-obvious inner “essence” that gives rise to observable features. Although this belief most commonly characterizes natural kind categories, I argue that psychological essentialism can also be extended in important ways to artifact concepts. Specifically, concepts of individual artifacts include the non-obvious feature of object history, which is evident when making judgments regarding authenticity and ownership. Classic examples include famous works of art (e.g., the Mona Lisa is authentic (...)
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  • Feeling, Meaning, and Intentionality—a Critique of the Neuroaesthetics of Beauty.Peer F. Bundgaard - 2015 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 14 (4):781-801.
    This article addresses the phenomenology of aesthetic experience. It first, critically, considers one of the most influential approaches to the psychophysics of aesthetic perception, viz. neuroaesthetics. Hereafter, it outlines constitutive tenets of aesthetic perception in terms of a particular intentional relation to the object. The argument comes in three steps. First, I show the inadequacies of the neuroaesthetics of beauty in general and Semir Zeki’s and V.J. Ramachandran’s versions of it in particular. The neuroaesthetics of beauty falls short, because it (...)
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  • Agent Tracking: A Psycho-Historical Theory of the Identification of Living and Social Agents.Nicolas J. Bullot - 2015 - Biology and Philosophy 30 (3):359-382.
    To explain agent-identification behaviours, universalist theories in the biological and cognitive sciences have posited mental mechanisms thought to be universal to all humans, such as agent detection and face recognition mechanisms. These universalist theories have paid little attention to how particular sociocultural or historical contexts interact with the psychobiological processes of agent-identification. In contrast to universalist theories, contextualist theories appeal to particular historical and sociocultural contexts for explaining agent-identification. Contextualist theories tend to adopt idiographic methods aimed at recording the heterogeneity (...)
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  • An Essentialist Account of Authenticity.George E. Newman - 2016 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 16 (3-4):294-321.
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  • Visualizing the Impact of Art: An Update and Comparison of Current Psychological Models of Art Experience.Matthew Pelowski, Patrick S. Markey, Jon O. Lauring & Helmut Leder - 2016 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 10.
  • Tracking the Actions and Possessions of Agents.Susan A. Gelman, Nicholaus S. Noles & Sarah Stilwell - 2014 - Topics in Cognitive Science 6 (4):599-614.
    We propose that there is a powerful human disposition to track the actions and possessions of agents. In two experiments, 3-year-olds and adults viewed sets of objects, learned a new fact about one of the objects in each set , and were queried about either the taught fact or an unrelated dimension immediately after a spatiotemporal transformation, and after a delay. Adults uniformly tracked object identity under all conditions, whereas children tracked identity more when taught ownership versus labeling information, and (...)
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  • Psycho-Historical Contextualization for Music and Visual Works: A Literature Review and Comparison Between Artistic Mediums.Anthony Chmiel & Emery Schubert - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
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  • From Beauty to Knowledge: A New Frame for the Neuropsychological Approach to Aesthetics.Gianluca Consoli - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  • Artistic Misunderstandings: The Emotional Significance of Historical Learning in the Arts.Nicolas J. Bullot & Rolf Reber - 2017 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 40.
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  • Aesthetics and the Sciences of Mind, Written by Greg Currie, Matthew Kieran, Aaron Meskin, and Jon Robson.Jean-Luc Jucker - 2015 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 15 (3-4):431-434.
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  • Creativity and Aesthetic Evaluation. Two Proposals to Improve the Model of Aesthetic Dis/Fluency.Gianluca Consoli - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
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  • Necker’s Smile: Immediate Affective Consequences of Early Perceptual Processes.Sascha Topolinski, Thorsten M. Erle & Rolf Reber - 2015 - Cognition 140:1-13.
    Current theories assume that perception and affect are separate realms of the mind. In contrast, we argue that affect is a genuine online-component of perception instantaneously mirroring the success of different perceptual stages. Consequently, we predicted that the success (failure) of even very early and cognitively encapsulated basic visual Processing steps would trigger immediate positive (negative) affective responses. To test this assumption, simple visual stimuli that either allowed or obstructed early visual processing stages without participants being aware of this were (...)
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  • Rhetorical Features Facilitate Prosodic Processing While Handicapping Ease of Semantic Comprehension.Winfried Menninghaus, Isabel C. Bohrn, Christine A. Knoop, Sonja A. Kotz, Wolff Schlotz & Arthur M. Jacobs - 2015 - Cognition 143:48-60.
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  • Orange is the New Aesthetic.Anjan Chatterjee - 2017 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 40.
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  • The Role of Similarity, Sound and Awareness in the Appreciation of Visual Artwork Via Motor Simulation.Christine McLean, Stephen C. Want & Benjamin J. Dyson - 2015 - Cognition 137:174-181.
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  • Neuroaesthetics.Anjan Chatterjee & Oshin Vartanian - 2014 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 18 (7):370-375.
  • Art and Science: A Philosophical Sketch of Their Historical Complexity and Codependence.Nicolas J. Bullot, William P. Seeley & Stephen Davies - 2017 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 75 (4):453-463.
    To analyze the relations between art and science, philosophers and historians have developed different lines of inquiry. A first type of inquiry considers how artistic and scientific practices have interacted over human history. Another project aims to determine the contributions that scientific research can make to our understanding of art, including the contributions that cognitive science can make to philosophical questions about the nature of art. We rely on contributions made to these projects in order to demonstrate that art and (...)
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  • The Artist and the Bengalese Finch.Stephen Davies - 2016 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 7 (4):715-720.
    Anjan Chatterjee has promoted an analogy between the Bengalese finch and the human artist. With reduced selective pressure from females due to its domestication, the male finch’s song has become more elaborate. Similarly, art’s lack of a practical function facilitates the creative generativity shown by artists. I argue that this analogy is flawed on both sides. Only recently has some art been regarded as non-functional. And the elaboration of the finch’s song is an effect of female selection under the conditions (...)
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  • Defining Art and Artworlds.Stephen Davies - 2015 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 73 (4):375-384.
    Most art is made by people with a well-developed concept of art and who are familiar with its forms and genres as well as with the informal institutions of its presentation and reception. This is reflected in philosophers’ proposed definitions. The earliest artworks were made by people who lacked the concept and in a context that does not resemble the art traditions of established societies, however. An adequate definition must accommodate their efforts. The result is a complex, hybrid definition: something (...)
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  • Explaining Person Identification: An Inquiry Into the Tracking of Human Agents.Nicolas J. Bullot - 2014 - Topics in Cognitive Science 6 (4):567-584.
    To introduce the issue of the tracking and identification of human agents, I examine the ability of an agent to track a human person and distinguish this target from other individuals: The ability to perform person identification. First, I discuss influential mechanistic models of the perceptual recognition of human faces and people. Such models propose detailed hypotheses about the parts and activities of the mental mechanisms that control the perceptual recognition of persons. However, models based on perceptual recognition are incomplete (...)
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  • Can Levinson's Intentional‐Historical Definition of Art Accommodate Revolutionary Art?Daniel Wilson - 2015 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 73 (4):407-416.
    In this article, I examine whether Jerrold Levinson's intentional-historical definition of art can successfully accommodate revolutionary art. For Levinson, an item is art if it was intended to be regarded as some prior art was regarded. But revolutionary art involves a regard that is “completely distinct” from preexisting art regards. I consider and reject Levinson's proposed solutions to the problem of accommodating revolutionary art. I then defend an alternative account of transgressive art regard. Unfortunately for the intentional-historical definition, the acceptance (...)
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  • When Critics Disagree: Prospects for Realism in Aesthetics.S. Ross - 2014 - Philosophical Quarterly 64 (257):590-618.
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