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  1. Pragmatic Conventionalism and Sport Normativity in the Face of Intractable Dilemmas.Tim L. Elcombe & Alun R. Hardman - 2019 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 47 (1):14-32.
    We build on Morgan’s deep conventionalist base by offering a pragmatic approach for achieving normative progress on sports most intractable problems (e.g. performance enhancemen...
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  • Doping and Cheating.Jan Vorstenbosch - 2010 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 37 (2):166-181.
    A familiar move that philosophers of sport make in the debate on the doping-issue is to reject from the start the argument that doping comes down to cheating. The claim that doping is cheating is often rebutted with the argument that doping is only cheating when one accepts that the use of doping is unjustified in itself. In this paper I want to argue that putting aside the cheating-argument in this way comes, first, too easy, because essential complexities of what (...)
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  • The Genius in Art and in Sport: A Contribution to the Investigation of Aesthetics of Sport.Stephen Mumford & Teresa Lacerda - 2010 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 37 (2):182-193.
    This paper contains a consideration of the notion of genius and its significance to the discussion of the aesthetics of sport. We argue that genius can make a positive aes- thetic contribution in both art and sport, just as some have argued that the moral content of a work of art can affect its aesthetic value. A genius is an exceptional inno- vator of successful strategies, where such originality adds aesthetic value. We argue that an original painting can have greater (...)
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  • Coping with Doping.J. Angelo Corlett, Vincent Brown & Kiersten Kirkland - 2013 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 40 (1):41-64.
    We provide a new wrinkle to the Argument from Unfair Advantage, a rather popular one in the ethics of doping in sports discussions. But we add a new argument that we believe places the moral burden on those who favor doping in sports. We also defend our position against some important concerns that might be raised against it. In the end, we argue that for the time being, doping in sports ought to be banned until it can be demonstrated that (...)
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  • Beware of Greeks Bearing Gifts: A Foucauldian Response to Holowchak.Michael Burke - 2004 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 31 (2):226-244.
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  • The Paradox of Bad Faith and Elite Competitive Sport.Leon Culbertson - 2005 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 32 (1):65-86.
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  • Burke, Moral Realism, and the View From Within Practices.Paul Davis - 2003 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 30 (2):117-131.
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  • Canadian Figure Skaters, French Judges, and Realism in Sport.Nicholas Dixon - 2003 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 30 (2):103-116.
  • Response to Dixon and Davis: Answering Realists With Antiepistemological Pragmatism.Michael Burke - 2006 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 33 (1):78-99.
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  • Fairness and Performance Enhancement in Sport.Craig L. Carr - 2008 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 35 (2):193-207.
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  • In Sport and Social Justice, Is Genetic Enhancement a Game Changer?Lisa S. Parker - 2012 - Health Care Analysis 20 (4):328-346.
    The possibility of genetic enhancement to increase the likelihood of success in sport and life’s prospects raises questions for accounts of sport and theories of justice. These questions obviously include the fairness of such enhancement and its relationship to the goals of sport and demands of justice. Of equal interest, however, is the effect on our understanding of individual effort, merit, and desert of either discovering genetic contributions to components of such effort or recognizing the influence of social factors on (...)
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  • Coping with Doping.J. Corlett, Vincent Brown Jr & Kiersten Kirkland - 2013 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 40 (1):41-64.
    We provide a new wrinkle to the Argument from Unfair Advantage, a rather popular one in the ethics of doping in sports discussions. But we add a new argument that we believe places the moral burden on those who favor doping in sports. We also defend our position against some important concerns that might be raised against it. In the end, we argue that for the time being, doping in sports ought to be banned until it can be demonstrated that (...)
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  • Rorty, Performance-Enhancing Drugs, and Change in Sport.Nicholas Dixon - 2001 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 28 (1):78-88.
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  • “Aretism” and Pharmacological Ergogenic Aids in Sport: Taking a Shot at the Use of Steroids.M. Andrew Holowchak - 2000 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 27 (1):35-50.
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  • “It's Just Not Cricket!” Rorty and Unfamiliar Movements: History of Metaphors In a Sporting Practice.Terence J. Roberts - 1997 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 24 (1):67-78.
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  • A Consideration of the Normative Status of Skill in the Purposive Sports.Paul Davis - 2007 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 1 (1):22 – 32.
    It is popularly believed within sport's practice communities that a contest fails if the competitor who performs most skilfully in it does not win. The belief is rarely acknowledged explicitly, and therefore deserves to be considered ideological in a sense. In this paper I challenge that belief. For conceptual reasons, I confine the discussion to the purposive sports, e.g. football and tennis. The concept of skill is approached by articulation of a set of platitudes about skill in the purposive sports. (...)
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  • Sport Philosophy Inquiry in 3D: A Pragmatic Response to the Philosophy Paradox.Tim L. Elcombe - 2018 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 12 (3):317-333.
    A paradoxical attitude exists toward professional philosophy: philosophical inquiry is considered important and complex, but professionals are deemed irrelevant and unnecessary. This paradox doubly affects sport philosophy as evidenced by the field’s marginalization in higher education and sociopolitical discourse. To counter the sport philosophy paradox, I present a pragmatically oriented three-dimensional approach to inquiry that turns the field “inside-out”. A community of engaged, melioratively oriented sport philosophy inquirers in this 3D model collectively conducts theoretical, applied, and instrumental inquiry. Each dimension (...)
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  • What Is Wrong With Playing High?Cesar R. Torres - 2009 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 36 (1):1-21.
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