Citations of work:

Jon Burchell & Joanne Cook (2006). It's Good to Talk? Examining Attitudes Towards Corporate Social Responsibility Dialogue and Engagement Processes.

15 found
Order:
Are we missing citations?

PhilPapers citations & references are currently in beta testing. We expect to add many more in the future.

Meanwhile, you can use our bibliography tool to import references for this or another work.

Or you can directly add citations for the above work:

Search for work by author name and title
Add directly by record ID

  1.  3
    Stakeholder Engagement Through Empowerment: The Case of Coffee Farmers.Chiara Civera, Simone de Colle & Cecilia Casalegno - forthcoming - Business Ethics: A European Review.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  4
    Engaging Stakeholders in Emerging Economies: The Case of Multilatinas.Anabella Davila, Carlos Rodriguez-Lluesma & Marta M. Elvira - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 152 (4):949-964.
    Stakeholder engagement is central to organizations’ social impact. Engagement activities rely on mechanisms whose complexity increases for multinational corporations. This study explores the boundary conditions of our Western/Northern-based knowledge of stakeholder engagement mechanisms through the examination of such practices in multinational companies founded in Latin America. Based on previous studies on the identification of organizational stakeholders in the region, we aim to understand the specific engagement mechanisms MLs use. To this end, we analyze qualitatively 28 corporate sustainability reports by relevant (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  3.  3
    Discursive Tensions in CSR Multi-Stakeholder Dialogue: A Foucauldian Perspective.Christiane Marie Høvring, Sophie Esmann Andersen & Anne Ellerup Nielsen - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 152 (3):627-645.
    Corporate social responsibility is a complex discipline that not only demands responsible behavior in production processes but also includes the concepts of communicative transparency and dialogue. Stakeholder dialogue is therefore expected to be an integrated part of the CSR strategy :323–338, 2006). However, only few studies have addressed the practice of CSR stakeholder dialogue and the challenges related hereto. This article adopts a postmodern perspective on CSR stakeholder dialogue. Based on a comprehensive single case study on stakeholder dialogue in a (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  4.  5
    Inspiring Action, Building Understanding: How Cross-Sector Partnership Engages Business in Addressing Global Challenges.Helen Wadham & Richard Warren - 2013 - Business Ethics: A European Review 22 (1):47-63.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  5.  4
    Conflicting Obligations, Moral Dilemmas and the Development of Judgement Through Business Ethics Education.Patrick Maclagan - 2012 - Business Ethics: A European Review 21 (2):183-197.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  6.  6
    Different Talks with Different Folks: A Comparative Survey of Stakeholder Dialog in Germany, Italy, and the U.S. [REVIEW]André Habisch, Lorenzo Patelli, Matteo Pedrini & Christoph Schwartz - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 100 (3):381 - 551.
    Although theoretical underpinnings of stakeholder dialog (SD) have been extensively discussed in the extant literature, there is a lack of empirical studies presenting evidence on the SD initiatives undertaken by firms. In this article, we provide information about 294 SD initiatives collected through a content analysis of the sustainability reports published by large firms in Germany, Italy, and the U. S. In addition to a country-based description of the different forms, stakeholder categories, and topics of the SD initiatives, we explore (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  7.  43
    Modeling Corporate Citizenship and Its Relationship with Organizational Citizenship Behaviors.Chieh-Peng Lin, Nyan-Myau Lyau, Yuan-Hui Tsai, Wen-Yung Chen & Chou-Kang Chiu - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 95 (3):357-372.
    Citizenship, such as corporate citizenship and organizational citizenship, has been an important issue in business management for decades. This study proposes a research model from the perspectives of social identity and resource allocation, by examining the influence of corporate citizenship on organizational citizenship behaviors (OCBs). In the model, OCBs are positively influenced by perceived legal citizenship and perceived ethical citizenship, while negatively influenced by perceived discretionary citizenship. Empirical testing using a survey of personnel from 18 large firms confirms most of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   23 citations  
  8.  29
    The Role of NGOs in CSR: Mutual Perceptions Among Stakeholders.Daniel Arenas, Josep M. Lozano & Laura Albareda - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 88 (1):175-197.
    This paper explores the role of NGOs in corporate social responsibility (CSR) through an analysis of various stakeholders’ perceptions and of NGOs’ self-perceptions. In the course of qualitative research based in Spain, we found that the perceptions of the role of NGOs fall into four categories: recognition of NGOs as drivers of CSR; concerns about their legitimacy; difficulties in the mutual understanding between NGOs and trade unions; the self-confidence of NGOs as important players in CSR. Each of these categories comprises (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  9.  32
    Applying Asset-Based Community Development as a Strategy for CSR: A Canadian Perspective on a Win–Win for Stakeholders and SMEs.Kyla Fisher, Jessica Geenen, Marie Jurcevic, Katya McClintock & Glynn Davis - 2009 - Business Ethics 18 (1):66-82.
    In the December 2006 edition of Harvard Business Review , Michael Porter and Mark Kramer argue that by approaching corporate social responsibility (CSR) based on corporate priorities, strengths and abilities, firms can develop socially and fiscally responsible solutions to current CSR issues, which will provide operational and competitive advantages. We agree that an effective approach to CSR includes a mapping of strategy, risk and opportunity. However, we also caution that the identification of these to the exclusion of societal input may (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  10.  4
    Applying Asset-Based Community Development as a Strategy for CSR: A Canadian Perspective on a Win-Win for Stakeholders and SMEs.Kyla Fisher, Jessica Geenen, Marie Jurcevic, Katya McClintock & Glynn Davis - 2009 - Business Ethics: A European Review 18 (1):66-82.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  11.  24
    Avoiding Empty Rhetoric: Engaging Publics in Debates About Nanotechnologies.Renee Kyle & Susan Dodds - 2009 - Science and Engineering Ethics 15 (1):81-96.
    Despite the amount of public investment in nanotechnology ventures in the developed world, research shows that there is little public awareness about nanotechnology, and public knowledge is very limited. This is concerning given that nanotechnology has been heralded as ‘revolutionising’ the way we live. In this paper, we articulate why public engagement in debates about nanotechnology is important, drawing on literature on public engagement and science policy debate and deliberation about public policy development. We also explore the significance of timing (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  12.  86
    Designing and Implementing Corporate Social Responsibility: An Integrative Framework Grounded in Theory and Practice. [REVIEW]François Maon, Adam Lindgreen & Valérie Swaen - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 87 (1):71 - 89.
    This article introduces an integrative framework of corporate social responsibility (CSR) design and implementation. A review of CSR literature -in particular with regard to design and implementation models -provides the background to develop a multiple case study. The resulting integrative framework, based on this multiple case study and Lewin's change model, highlights four stages that span nine steps of the CSR design and implementation process. Finally, the study identifies critical success factors for the CSR process.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   35 citations  
  13.  25
    A Life Cycle Model of Multi-Stakeholder Networks.Julia Roloff - 2008 - Business Ethics 17 (3):311–325.
    In multi-stakeholder networks, actors from civil society, business and governmental institutions come together in order to find a common solution to a problem that affects all of them. Problems approached by such networks often affect people across national boundaries, tend to be very complex and are not sufficiently understood. In multi-stakeholder networks, information concerning a problem is gathered from different sources, learning takes place, conflicts between participants are addressed and cooperation is sought. Corporations are key actors in many networks, because (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  14.  3
    A Life Cycle Model of Multi-Stakeholder Networks.Julia Roloff - 2008 - Business Ethics: A European Review 17 (3):311-325.
  15.  99
    Learning From Multi-Stakeholder Networks: Issue-Focussed Stakeholder Management.Julia Roloff - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 82 (1):233-250.
    From an analysis of the role of companies in multi-stakeholder networks and a critical review of stakeholder theory, it is argued that companies practise two different types of stakeholder management: they focus on their organization’s welfare (organization- focussed stakeholder management) or on an issue that affects their relationship with other societal groups and organizations (issue-focussed stakeholder management). These two approaches supplement each other. It is demonstrated that issue-focussed stakeholder management dominates in multi-stakeholder networks, because it enables corporations to address complex (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   29 citations