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Keith Burgess-Jackson (1996). Rape a Philosophical Investigation.

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  1.  28
    Present and Future Instances of Virtual Rape in Light of Three Categories of Legal Philosophical Theories on Rape.Litska Strikwerda - 2015 - Philosophy and Technology 28 (4):491-510.
    This paper is about the question of whether or not virtual rape should be considered a crime under current law. A virtual rape is the rape of an avatar in a virtual world. In the future, possibilities for virtual rape of a person him- or herself will arise in virtual reality environments involving a haptic device or robotics. As the title indicates, I will study both these present and future instances of virtual rape in light of three categories of legal (...)
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  2.  79
    Rape as an Essentially Contested Concept.Eric Reitan - 2001 - Hypatia 16 (2):43-66.
    : Because "rape" has such a powerful appraisive meaning, how one defines the term has normative significance. Those who define rape rigidly so as to exclude contemporary feminist understandings are therefore seeking to silence some moral perspectives "by definition." I argue that understanding rape as an essentially contested concept allows the concept sufficient flexibility to permit open moral discourse, while at the same time preserving a core meaning that can frame the discourse.
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  3.  5
    Rape as an Essentially Contested Concept.Eric Reitan - 2001 - Hypatia 16 (2):43-66.
    Because "rape" has such a powerful appraisive meaning, how one defines the term has normative significance. Those who define rape rigidly so as to exclude contemporary feminist understandings are therefore seeking to silence some moral perspectives "by definition." I argue that understanding rape as an essentially contested concept allows the concept sufficient flexibility to permit open moral discourse, while at the same time preserving a core meaning that can frame the discourse.
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