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The Hippocampal and Parietal Foundation of Spatial Cognition

(ed.)
Oxford University Press UK (1998)

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  1. Beyond Core Knowledge: Natural Geometry.Elizabeth Spelke, Sang Ah Lee & Véronique Izard - 2010 - Cognitive Science 34 (5):863-884.
    For many centuries, philosophers and scientists have pondered the origins and nature of human intuitions about the properties of points, lines, and figures on the Euclidean plane, with most hypothesizing that a system of Euclidean concepts either is innate or is assembled by general learning processes. Recent research from cognitive and developmental psychology, cognitive anthropology, animal cognition, and cognitive neuroscience suggests a different view. Knowledge of geometry may be founded on at least two distinct, evolutionarily ancient, core cognitive systems for (...)
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  • “Near” and “Far” in Language and Perception.David Kemmerer - 1999 - Cognition 73 (1):35-63.
  • Introduction to the Topic on Modeling Spatial Cognition.Glenn Gunzelmann - 2011 - Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (4):628-631.
    Our ability to process spatial information is fundamental for understanding and interacting with the environment, and it pervades other components of cognitive functioning from language to mathematics. Moreover, technological advances have produced new capabilities that have created research opportunities and astonishing applications. In this Topic on Modeling Spatial Cognition, research crossing a variety of disciplines and methodologies is described, all focused on developing models to represent the capacities and limitations of human spatial cognition.
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  • Representations and Processes of Human Spatial Competence.Glenn Gunzelmann & Don R. Lyon - 2011 - Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (4):741-759.
    This article presents an approach to understanding human spatial competence that focuses on the representations and processes of spatial cognition and how they are integrated with cognition more generally. The foundational theoretical argument for this research is that spatial information processing is central to cognition more generally, in the sense that it is brought to bear ubiquitously to improve the adaptivity and effectiveness of perception, cognitive processing, and motor action. We describe research spanning multiple levels of complexity to understand both (...)
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  • Returning the Tables: Language Affects Spatial Reasoning.Stephen C. Levinson, Sotaro Kita, Daniel B. M. Haun & Björn H. Rasch - 2002 - Cognition 84 (2):155-188.
  • Plasticity of Human Spatial Cognition: Spatial Language and Cognition Covary Across Cultures.Daniel B. M. Haun, Christian J. Rapold, Gabriele Janzen & Stephen C. Levinson - 2011 - Cognition 119 (1):70-80.
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  • Geometric Determinants of Human Spatial Memory.Tom Hartley, Iris Trinkler & Neil Burgess - 2004 - Cognition 94 (1):39-75.
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  • Keeping Track of Objects While Exploring a Spatial Layout with Partial Cues: Location-Based and Deictic Direction-Based Strategies.Nicolas J. Bullot & Jacques Droulez - unknown
    Last year at VSS, Bullot, Droulez & Pylyshyn reported studies using a Modified Traveling Salesman Paradigm in which a virtual vehicle had to visit up to 10 targets once and only once, and in which the invisible targets were identified only by line segments pointing from the vehicle toward each target. We hypothesized that subjects used two distinct strategies: A “location-based strategy”, which kept track of where targets were located in screen coordinates, and a “segment-based strategy” that kept track of (...)
     
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  • From Monkey-Like Action Recognition to Human Language: An Evolutionary Framework for Neurolinguistics.Michael A. Arbib - 2005 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (2):105-124.
    The article analyzes the neural and functional grounding of language skills as well as their emergence in hominid evolution, hypothesizing stages leading from abilities known to exist in monkeys and apes and presumed to exist in our hominid ancestors right through to modern spoken and signed languages. The starting point is the observation that both premotor area F5 in monkeys and Broca's area in humans contain a “mirror system” active for both execution and observation of manual actions, and that F5 (...)
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  • Toward a Theory of the Empirical Tracking of Individuals: Cognitive Flexibility and the Functions of Attention in Integrated Tracking.Nicolas J. Bullot - 2009 - Philosophical Psychology 22 (3):353-387.
    How do humans manage to keep track of a gradually changing object or person as the same persisting individual despite the fact that the extraction of information about this individual must often rely on heterogeneous information sources and heterogeneous tracking methods? The article introduces the Empirical Tracking of Individuals theory to address this problem. This theory proposes an analysis of the concept of integrated tracking, which refers to the capacity to acquire, store, and update information about the identity and location (...)
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  • Keeping Track of Invisible Individuals While Exploring a Spatial Layout with Partial Cues: Location-Based and Deictic Direction-Based Strategies.Nicolas Bullot - 2008 - Philosophical Psychology 21 (1):15-46.
    In contrast to Constructivist Views, which construe perceptual cognition as an essentially reconstructive process, this article recommends the Deictic View, which grounds perception in perceptual-demonstrative reference and the use of deictic tracking strategies for acquiring and updating knowledge about individuals. The view raises the problem of how sensory-motor tracking connects to epistemic and integrated forms of tracking. To study the strategies used to solve this problem, we report a study of the ability to track distal individuals when only their directions (...)
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