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  1. The Decline of Public Interest Agricultural Science and the Dubious Future of Crop Biological Control in California.Keith D. Warner, Kent M. Daane, Christina M. Getz, Stephen P. Maurano, Sandra Calderon & Kathleen A. Powers - 2011 - Agriculture and Human Values 28 (4):483-496.
    Drawing from a four-year study of US science institutions that support biological control of arthropods, this article examines the decline in biological control institutional capacity in California within the context of both declining public interest science and declining agricultural research activism. After explaining how debates over the public interest character of biological control science have shaped institutions in California, we use scientometric methods to assess the present status and trends in biological control programs within both the University of California Land (...)
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  • A Case Study From the Post-New Deal State Agricultural Experiment Station System: A Life of Mixed Signals in Southern Illinois. [REVIEW]Joanna P. Ganning, Courtney G. Flint & Stephen Gasteyer - 2012 - Agriculture and Human Values 29 (4):493-506.
    A wide literature in the sociology of agriculture has depicted the development of agricultural experiment stations at land grant colleges as part of a development project to improve agricultural productivity in particular commodities. Some experiment stations developed regional agricultural centers or stations to improve productivity and address local concerns, recognizing the importance of context in rural development. Through analysis of one such station, the Dixon Springs Agricultural Center in Southern Illinois, this paper describes how regional agricultural stations played a key (...)
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  • If They Come, We Will Build It: In Vitro Meat and the Discursive Struggle Over Future Agrofood Expectations.Robert Magneson Chiles - 2013 - Agriculture and Human Values 30 (4):511-523.
    According to recent literature in the sociology of expectations, expectations about the future are “performative” in that they provide guidance for activities, attract attention, mobilize political and economic resources, coordinate between groups, link technical and social concerns, create visions, and enroll supporters. While this framework has blossomed over the past decade in science and technology studies, it has yet to be applied towards a more refined understanding of how the future of the modern agrofood system is being actively contested and (...)
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