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J. Baird Callicott (1980). Animal Liberation.

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  1.  36
    Can a Corporation Be Worthy of Moral Consideration?Kenneth Silver - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-13.
    Much has been written about what corporations owe society and whether it is appropriate to hold them responsible. In contrast, little has been written about whether anything is owed to corporations apart from what is owed to their members. And when this question has been addressed, the answer has always been that corporations are not worthy of any distinct moral consideration. This is even claimed by proponents of corporate agency. In this paper, I argue that proponents of corporate agency should (...)
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  2.  1
    Introduction to “The Good, the Beautiful, the Green: Environmentalism and Aesthetics”.Sandra Shapshay & Levi Tenen - 2018 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 76 (4):391-397.
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  3.  15
    Experimental Approaches to Moral Standing.Geoffrey P. Goodwin - 2015 - Philosophy Compass 10 (12):914-926.
    Moral patients deserve moral consideration and concern – they have moral standing. What factors drive attributions of moral standing? Understanding these factors is important because it indicates how broadly individuals conceptualize the moral world, and suggests how they will treat various entities, both human and non-human. This understanding has recently been advanced by a series of studies conducted by both psychologists and philosophers, which have revealed three main drivers of moral standing: the capacity to suffer, intelligence or autonomy, and the (...)
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  4.  47
    Captivity for Conservation? Zoos at a Crossroads.Jozef Keulartz - 2015 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 28 (2):335-351.
    This paper illuminates a variety of issues that speak to the question of whether ‘captivity for conservation’ can be an ethically acceptable goal of the modern zoo. Reflecting on both theoretical disagreements and practical challenges , the paper explains why the ‘Noah’s Ark’ paradigm is being replaced by an alternative ‘integrated approach.’ It explores the changes in the zoo’s core tasks that the new paradigm implies. And it pays special attention to the changes that would have to be made in (...)
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  5.  28
    An Ecological Concept of Wilderness. DeLancey - 2012 - Ethics and the Environment 17 (1):25-44.
  6. The Anthropocentric Advantage? Environmental Ethics and Climate Change Policy.Nicole Hassoun - 2011 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 14 (2):235-257.
    Environmental ethicists often criticize liberalism. For many liberals embrace anthropocentric theories on which only humans have non?instrumental value. Environmental ethicists argue that such liberals fail to account for many things that matter or provide an ethic sufficient for addressing climate change. These critics suggest that many parts of nature ? e.g. non?human individuals, other species, ecosystems and the biosphere ? often these critics also hold that concern for some parts of nature does not always trump concern for others. This article (...)
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  7. Intensive Livestock Farming: Global Trends, Increased Environmental Concerns, and Ethical Solutions.Ramona Cristina Ilea - 2009 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 22 (2):153-167.
    By 2050, global livestock production is expected to double—growing faster than any other agricultural sub-sector—with most of this increase taking place in the developing world. As the United Nation’s four-hundred-page report, Livestock’s Long Shadow: Environmental Issues and Options , documents, livestock production is now one of three most significant contributors to environmental problems, leading to increased greenhouse gas emissions, land degradation, water pollution, and increased health problems. The paper draws on the UN report as well as a flurry of other (...)
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  8. Environmental Ethics: An Overview.Katie McShane - 2009 - Philosophy Compass 4 (3):407-420.
    This essay provides an overview of the field of environmental ethics. I sketch the major debates in the field from its inception in the 1970s to today, explaining both the central tenets of the schools of thought within the field and the arguments that have been given for and against them. I describe the main trends within the field as a whole and review some of the criticisms that have been offered of prevailing views.
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  9. Seeing Animals, Speaking of Nature.Ito Mimei - 2008 - Theory, Culture and Society 25 (4):119-137.
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  10.  12
    Synthetic Biology: Drawing a Line in Darwin's Sand.Christopher J. Preston - 2008 - Environmental Values 17 (1):23 - 39.
    Maintaining the coherence of the distinction between nature and artefact has long been central to environmental thinking. By building genomes from scratch out of 'bio-bricks', synthetic biology promises to create biotic artefacts markedly different from anything created thus far in biotechnology. These new biotic artefacts depart from a core principle of Darwinian natural selection – descent through modification – leaving them with no causal connection to historical evolutionary processes. This departure from the core principle of Darwinism presents a challenge to (...)
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  11.  2
    Synthetic Biology: Drawing a Line in Darwin's Sand.Christopher J. Preston - 2008 - Environmental Values 17 (1):23-39.
    Maintaining the coherence of the distinction between nature and artefact has long been central to environmental thinking. By building genomes from scratch out of 'bio-bricks', synthetic biology promises to create biotic artefacts markedly different from anything created thus far in biotechnology. These new biotic artefacts depart from a core principle of Darwinian natural selection - descent through modification - leaving them with no causal connection to historical evolutionary processes. This departure from the core principle of Darwinism presents a challenge to (...)
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  12. Animal Ethics and Interest Conflicts.Elisa Aaltola - 2005 - Ethics and the Environment 10 (1):19-48.
    : Animal ethics has presented convincing arguments for the individual value of animals. Animals are not only valuable instrumentally or indirectly, but in themselves. Less has been written about interest conflicts between humans and other animals, and the use of animals in practice. The motive of this paper is to analyze different approaches to interest conflicts. It concentrates on six models, which are the rights model, the interest model, the mental complexity model, the special relations model, the multi-criteria model, and (...)
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  13.  4
    Katz's Problematic Dualism and Its?Seismic? Effects on His Theory.Wayne Ouderkirk - 2002 - Ethics and the Environment 7 (1):124-137.
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  14.  52
    Environmental Ethics and Trophy Hunting.Alastair S. Gunn - 2001 - Ethics and the Environment 6 (1):68-95.
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  15.  42
    A Critical Overview of Environmental Ethics.Warwick Fox - 1996 - World Futures 46 (1):1-21.
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  16.  32
    Deep Ecology Versus Ecofeminism: Healthy Differences or Incompatible Philosophies?Robert Sessions - 1991 - Hypatia 6 (1):90 - 107.
    Deep ecology and ecofeminism are contemporary environmental philosophies that share the desire to supplant the predominant Western anthropocentric environmental frameworks. Recently thinkers from these movements have focused their critiques on each other, and substantial differences have emerged. This essay explores central aspects of this debate to ascertain whether either philosophy has been undermined in the process and whether there are any indications that they are compatible despite their differences.
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